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    Republicans are gaining steam in the fight for Congress, overtaking the Democrats in public opinion polls gauging voter preferences for party control on Capitol Hill. A fresh ABC News/Washington Post survey put the Republicans 10 percentage points ahead of the Democrats on this key 2022 measuring stick, pushing them to 44.1% and in front by nearly 1 point in the RealClearPolitics average of the 10 most recent surveys. That poll was the third of six this month to project the Republicans with an edge in the race for the majority in the House and Senate. Democrats led in the other three November public opinion surveys, revealing a competitive midterm elections landscape. But their average advantage of 4 points was less than half of the GOP’s 8.3 points as of Monday afternoon. With President Joe Biden’s job approval ratings still in the tank at 42% despite the passage of a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, House Republicans have moved beyond projecting confidence about the midterm elections to gloating. “There is no good news for House Democrats and their historically thin majority,”...
    President Joe Biden has picked roughly one-third of the nominees for positions in his administration that require Senate confirmation; 405 identified out of about 1,200 total slots. There are another 2,500+ positions that are political appointments not needing confirmation, many of which have burrowed Trumpers still hanging around. He’s been chipping away at it, and some of the worst are gone. For example, he fired the odious Social Security Commissioner Andrew Saul when Saul refused to resign. That was in July. Kilolo Kijakazi, the deputy commissioner for retirement and disability policy, has been serving as acting commissioner, and Biden hasn’t named a permanent commissioner. That’s not the worst thing, yet. Among the worst things would be allowing Republicans to take over the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which is in actual danger of happening if Biden doesn’t name a fifth commissioner as well as appointing the FCC chief. Right now, Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel is temporarily serving as interim director, a position that ends at the end of the year unless Biden formally nominates her and she is confirmed. The real danger is that the FCC majority...
    Scottsdale, Arizona (CNN)When Kyrsten Sinema won her US Senate seat in 2018, she was the first Democrat from Arizona elected to the chamber in three decades. It was a triumphant gain for her party -- bolstered further when Democrats took over the White House and the Senate two years later, giving them a trifecta of power. But now many Democratic voters in her state feel Sinema is squandering the moment, holding back major agenda items crafted by President Joe Biden and supported by progressives. "This is our moment to deliver on all of the promises that we made," said Emily Kirkland, the executive director of Progress Arizona. "She is just absolutely standing in the way of that, without making clear what she wants."Kirkland, who often spent 13-hour days campaigning for Sinema three years ago, now feels "incredibly frustrated" with the senator's hesitation to go along with her party on a major $3.5 trillion spending bill that Democrats hope to pass to enact a wide range of key liberal priorities.Sinema and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, another centrist Democrat, have been...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has been slammed on social media for dancing backstage at the We Love NYC: The Homecoming Concert in Central Park on Saturday. Critics voiced their outrage that Schumer would dare to dance while thousands of Americans and Afghans who helped the United States remain in Afghanistan.  Others noted that the concert was held despite the oncoming Hurricane Henri, which is expected to hit either Long Island or New England on Sunday. Meanwhile, some critics slammed New York officials like Mayor Bill de Blasio for holding the concert while the Delta variant of COVID-19 wreaks havoc on America. The offending video showed Schumer dancing with The Late Show host Stephen Colbert and was posted to Twitter by Bill Neidhardt, the press secretary for de Blasio. 'Backstage antics,' Neidhardt had captioned the video. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has been slammed on social media for dancing backstage at the We Love NYC: The Homecoming Concert in Central Park New York City's homecoming concert was dramatically cancelled half way through, and revelers were told to leave Central...
    They've fed us through the pandemic. Senate Democrats need to honor that work. Back in February and March, all eyes were on an employee of the Senate, the parliamentarian "an appointed official who advises the chamber on matters of procedure," as David Nir explained, making an important point. "The key word there, though, is 'advises': The presiding officer—that person who occupies the big chair atop the central dais you’ve seen on C-SPAN, either the vice president or a sitting senator—is free to reject that advice." It was true when the $15/hour minimum wage was the issue on the COVID-19 relief bill. It's true today when the discussion is adding immigration reform to the next budget reconciliation bill to pass President Joe Biden's sweeping economic recovery plan. We all remember the result of the parliamentarian's ruling last time: The wage hike was left out of the base bill and Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona made an obnoxious spectacle of herself when Democrats tried to include it as an amendment. It could have been included in the bill. It should have been included...
    The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) raised what it spotlighted as a "record-breaking" $10.52 million haul last month, as the re-election arm of the Senate GOP builds resources as it aims to regain the Senate majority in the 2022 midterm elections. According to figures from the NRSC, which were released on Tuesday, the committee brought in $28 million in total during the April-June second quarter of fundraising and just over $51 million since the start of 2021.  FIVE BIG QUESTIONS AS THE GOP TRIES TO WIN BACK THE SENATE MAJORITY IN 2022 The committee also reported having more than $25 million in its coffers, which it touts is more than double the cash on hand it had at the same point in the 2020 election cycle. The NRSC added that it’s carrying no debt. The rival Democratic Senate Campaign Committee, which has yet to release its June or second quarter numbers, brought in $22.7 million in the first quarter of the year. "The NRSC is making historic investments in digital fundraising that are already paying dividends and will continue to throughout...
    More On: mitch mcconnell McConnell on infrastructure: ‘I think there’s a decent chance that may come together’ McConnell vows ‘hell of a fight’ over Dems’ infrastructure plan Pelosi firm on order for reconciliation with $1.2T bill Biden defends Afghanistan pullout as Taliban gobbles more territory Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, made his case Thursday that voters should return the House and Senate to Republican control in next year’s midterm elections, insisting that such an outcome “doesn’t mean nothing happens.” “What I want you to know,” the Kentucky Republican told a Chamber of Commerce luncheon in his home state, “is if I become the majority leader again it’s not for stopping everything. It’s for stopping the worst. It’s for stopping things that fundamentally push the country into a direction that at least my party feels is not a good idea for the country.” McConnell added that if he becomes majority leader again, “I can make sure [President] Biden keeps his promise [he made] in ’20 to be a moderate.” The Senate is currently split 50-50, with Democrats holding the advantage...
    President Joe Biden was asked Wednesday on the tarmac in Geneva what he thought about Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's threat to block a Biden Supreme Court nominee if there was a vacancy in 2024, the year of the next presidential race.  'The answer is Mitch has been nothing but no for a long time. And I'm sure he means exactly what he says, but we'll see,' Biden told reporters before leaving Switzerland for Joint Base Andrews.  On Monday, McConnell had appeared on Hugh Hewitt's radio show and was asked if he'd repeat with Biden what he did to President Barack Obama in 2016 - not give Obama's Supreme Court pick, now Attorney General Merrick Garland, a vote, because it was during a presidential election year.  McConnell would have to first win back the Senate majority during the 2022 midterms.   'I think it's highly unlikely - in fact, no, I don't think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election,' McConnell answered.  President Joe Biden was asked...
    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told Democrats time is running out because a death could cause them to lose the party's Senate majority.  'During the Obama admin, folks thought we’d have a 60 Dem majority for a while. It lasted 4 months,' the New York Democrat tweeted Wednesday afternoon. 'Dems are burning precious time & impact negotiating w/GOP who won’t even vote for a Jan 6 commission.' She added, 'McConnell’s plan is to run out the clock. It’s a hustle. We need to move now.' Ocasio-Cortez was referring to the death of Sen. Ted Kennedy, a Democrat from Massachusetts, who died in August 2009, seven months into Obama's tenure.   Kennedy's seat was won that January, in a special election, by Republican Sen. Scott Brown, killing the Democrats' 60-vote filibuster-proof majority.   Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warned the Democrats they could lose their slim Senate majority if one of their members died Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted Wednesday afternoon that Dems were 'burning precious time' by trying to negotiate with Senate Republicans  In the Senate currently, the Democrats have just 50 votes and get...
    (CNN)The realities of a narrow Senate majority are coming into focus as Democrats approach the holiday weekend and a turn in the season still grappling with how to pass key items in their agenda from voting rights and gun control to immigration and infrastructure.With key votes all teetering or stalled in the 50-50 Senate, here is a quick primer on where things stand as of Wednesday. Bottom line: The diverse Democratic caucus that includes moderates like Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, whose constant refusal to gut the filibuster underscores how limited Majority Leader Chuck Schumer's power really is. Infrastructure It's going to be a long few months as Democrats grapple with whether they can even pass Biden's top priority infrastructure.Read MoreThere is an assumption that if Democrats can't strike a deal with Republicans on infrastructure, they'll simply turn to reconciliation and move swiftly.But, there is no guarantee that process works. (*See above on Manchin. He told CNN's Manu Raju on Tuesday he sees no need for reconciliation at this point. And a handful of other senators say they want...
    Republican state Sen. Carla Nelson narrowly won reelection even as Joe Biden was decisively carrying her district. Daily Kos Elections is pleased to present new data from Minnesota breaking down the 2020 presidential results for every district in the state House and Senate—which, unusually, are held by opposite parties. Democrats went into last year’s election hoping to net the two seats they’d need to retake the upper chamber after four years in the minority, but despite winning more Senate votes statewide, Team Blue only flipped a single seat. More painfully still, Joe Biden carried 37 of the Senate's 67 seats, a comfortable majority similar in proportion to his share of the statewide vote, which he won 53-45. Compounding the Democrats' poor showing, two of the party's sitting senators, Tom Bakk and David Tomassoni, announced weeks after the election that they would become independents, which earned the duo committee chairmanships from the GOP majority. This state of affairs has given Republicans and their new allies a 36-31 edge in the chamber. Altogether, six Republicans sit in Biden seats. The bluest of...
    On Thursday, April 1, Senate Mitch McConnell, President of the Republican Minorities, “Fight every stepThe colossal infrastructure investment plan put forward by J Joe Biden has a very narrow majority in Congress to carry out his plans. Also read:USA: Biden project mobilizes tax hike lobbies The Democratic president wants to invest about $ 2 trillion in infrastructure in eight years and fight climate change.Millions of jobs“. He wants to fund his project by raising the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28%. The White House says it wants to mobilize the support of Democrats and Republicans in Congress for these popular actions, he tells voters on all sides. It is not possible to trust Mitch McConnell, an influential Republican leader in the Senate. “Trojan horseIncrease tax increase. “Although we want to take care of the infrastructure, I think the plan they are implementing is not going to get support from our side because (…) the last thing our economy needs at the moment is a huge increase in taxes on all manufacturing sectors of our economyThe senator said Thursday. “I...
    As Democrats strategize to pass legislation with only a narrow majority in the Senate, the debate about reforming or even abolishing the filibuster has led both sides to dig up old video clips of partisans arguing the opposite angle they’re taking in 2021. The latest round in the hypocrisy-palooza comes from former President Barack Obama, back in 2005 when he was a Senator from Illinois. The April 13, 2005 clip from Obama’s speech from the Senate floor was played Thursday on Special Report with Bret Baier. Anchor Bret Baier introduced the clip, saying they had “just dug this out Sunday.” Said Obama in defense of the filibuster then, when the Senate was under Republican control: The American people, they sent us here to be their voice. They understand those voices can at times become loud and argumentative, but they hope we can disagree without being disagreeable. And at the end of the day, they expect to both parties to work together to get the people’s business done. What they don’t expect is for one party, be it Republican or Democrat, to change the rules in the middle of the game so that they can...
    Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., spent over an hour on the Senate floor Wednesday night reading a 2005 speech from President Biden verbatim where Biden said eliminating the filibuster would "eviscerate the Senate."  Biden, then a Delaware senator, said at the time it was "one of the most important speeches for historical purposes that I will have given in the 32 years since I have been in the Senate." He said that ending the 60-vote hurdle would turn the Senate "into the House of Representatives." The Senate at that time was also split 50-50. George W. Bush was in office, meaning a Republican had the tie-breaking vote, Vice President Dick Cheney.  Biden said at the time "the Senate ought not act rashly by changing its rules to satisfy a strong-willed majority acting in the heat of the moment."  The former senator said, "it is my personal belief that the Senate should be more judicious in the use of the filibuster." He added that "it should come as no surprise that in periods where the electorate is split very evenly, as it is now, the filibustering...
    In the wake of two horrific shooting tragedies, Americans once again have a reminder that Republican minority rule in the Senate is standing in the way of saving lives. Earlier this month, the House sent two gun control bills designed to expand background checks and close the "Charleston loophole" for gun sales to the Senate, where they are dead on arrival due to the filibuster.   On Tuesday, President Biden urged the Senate to take action on those bills and more in remarks from the State Dining Room. “We can ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines in this country once again. I got that done when I was a senator. It passed," Biden said. "We should do it again.” But there's two big differences between the Senate effort Biden was part of in 1993 and now: Mitch McConnell and the filibuster. As progressive activist Joe Sudbay noted, the '93 Assault Weapons Ban cleared the Democratic-controlled Senate by a simple majority vote, 56-to-43, with 46 Democrats and 10 Republicans voting in favor of the bill. Democrats never had to clear a 60-vote threshold...
    President Joe Biden may have won the presidential election, but his Democratic allies control very narrow majorities in Congress. Without a clear mandate to pass his far-reaching legislative agenda, sources close to the president told Axios he is willing to “overhaul” the rules on Capitol Hill. Biden held an undisclosed meeting with historians at the White House that included discussions about the historical ramifications of his agenda, according to Axios. The historians reportedly urged Biden to go “even bigger and faster” than expected, even if that meant dismissing bipartisan cooperation and ending the filibuster. Biden loves the growing narrative that he’s bolder and bigger-thinking than President Obama. https://t.co/9PAz1s7TZM — Axios (@axios) March 24, 2021 Biden and his Democratic allies in Congress could potentially oversee a $5 trillion “overhaul” of the entire nation, including lasting changes to the economy and voting laws, according to Axios. The president also has a number of advantages. Democrats currently control both chambers of Congress, though there is speculation of a Republican wave in the 2022 midterms. Biden is riding the coattails of an economic...
                      by Robert Romano  “I may even decide to beat them for a third time. Okay? For a third time.” That was former President Donald Trump at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Feb. 28, hinting at another potential run for President in 2024. If he pulled it off, Trump would be the first incumbent president to lose to then be reelected again since Grover Cleveland did it in 1892. Naturally, this has led to intense speculation in the Beltway and nationally about another potential Trump presidential bid. So, will Trump run again? Under normal circumstances, you might expect President Joe Biden to run again in 2024, but by then he will be 81 years old, and so it is uncertain if he will do so. But, maybe if Trump is running again, there is increased pressure for Biden to run again, too, especially if Democrats think Biden is the only one who can beat Trump. So, why might Trump be thinking of another run? Here’s a few factors to consider....
    Joe Manchin, 73, won't accept a simple majority rule in the Senate, threatening in a Monday clip to block Joe Biden's next massive legislative overhaul if Democrats don't allow Republicans a seat at the negotiating table. The centrist West Virginia Democratic senator told 'Axios on HBO' in an interview clip released Monday that he will demand the GOP have a bigger voice on Biden's climate and infrastructure package – which could reach an outstanding $4 trillion – than they had on COVID stimulus. 'I'm not going to do it through reconciliation,' Manchin told Axios' Mike Allen when speaking of the next bill. 'I am not going to get on a bill that cuts them out completely before we start.' Reconciliation requires Congress only reach a simple majority to pass a piece of legislation – like with the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package that just passed the Senate on Saturday. He also warned Democratic colleagues against forcing through legislation by a simple majority. 'I would say this to my friends. You've got power,' Manchin said. 'Don't abuse it. And that's exactly...
    During Tuesday’s broadcast of FNC’s “Hannity,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) weighed in on the developing feud between former President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). Graham reminded viewers that McConnell played a role in Trump’s successes but said Trump would be a needed component for Republicans to win the majority back in 2022. “[M]itch McConnell was indispensable for President Trump in getting the judges on the court, getting a major tax cut through a very narrow Senate majority. But what I would say to Senator McConnell: I know that Trump can be a handful, but he is the most dominant figure in the Republican Party. We don’t have a snowball’s chance in hell of taking the majority without Donald Trump. If you don’t get that, you’re just not looking. He was a hell of a president on all of the things that conservatives really believe in. It was a consequential presidency.” “I’m sorry about what happened on January 6,” Graham continued. “He will get his fair share of blame. But to my Republican colleagues in the Senate:...
    February 17, 2021 7:24 AM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The former president of the United States (USA), Donald Trump, urged Republicans on Tuesday to replace as their leader in the Senate Mitch McConnell, who delivered a very harsh speech against him at the end of this weekend the impeachment. “Mitch is a dry, rough and serious politician, and If the Republican senators are going to stay with him, they won’t win again“This was stated by Trump in a statement distributed by the Save America campaign committee. The former president also affirmed that the Republican Party “can never again be respected or strong with” leaders “like McConnell, and held him responsible for the loss of the conservative majority in the Senate in the legislative pasts. “McConnell’s dedication to business as usual, the politics of status quo, alongside his lack of political acumen, wisdom and personalityThey have swiftly moved him from majority leader to minority leader, and it will only get worse, “Trump added. “It has not been spared” This harsh pronouncement comes after impeachment against Trump for the...
    February 11, 2021 10:59 AM | With information from DPA 15 minutes. Former United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton assured that if the Senate acquits former President Donald Trump of the charge of inciting the insurrection, it will not be because he is innocent, but “because the jury includes his accomplices.” “If the Republicans in the Senate do not condemn Trump, it will not be because the facts are on their side or their lawyers have put together a competent defense,” he said in Twitter the former candidate, who faced Trump in the 2016 presidential elections and who obtained a majority of the popular vote. If Senate Republicans fail to convict Donald Trump, it won’t be because the facts were with him or his lawyers mounted a competent defense. It will be because the jury includes his co-conspirators. – Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) February 10, 2021 Hillary Clinton spoke in this way in relation to the impeachment against Trump that is taking place in the Upper House. In a previous message, the Democrat alluded to the words of one...
    A majority of Americans want to see the Senate convict former President Donald Trump, a CBS News/YouGov survey released Tuesday found. The survey, conducted February 5-8, asked 2,508 U.S. residents if the Senate should convict Trump for the incitement of insurrection, stemming from the riot that occurred at the U.S. Capitol on January 6 as members of Congress gathered to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. The survey asked: As you may know, the House of Representatives impeached Donald Trump for inciting violence against the government of the United States, and now the Senate will hold a trial. Based on what you know so far, what do you think the Senate should do in that trial? A majority, or 56 percent, said the Senate should convict Trump, while 44 percent said lawmakers should not convict the former president. The survey also found the same majority of voters, 56 percent, believe Trump’s words and actions leading up to the protest “encouraged violence at the Capitol.” Thirty-one percent said his words and actions had no impact, and 13 percent said...
    Most Americans believe that the Senate impeachment trial for former President Trump will only serve to “cause more division” in the country, a Rasmussen Reports survey released Thursday found. The survey, taken January 25-26 among 1,000 likely U.S. voters, asked, “Will the Senate trial on Trump’s impeachment help unite the country or will it cause more division? Or will it not make much difference?” Fifty-seven percent, overall, said it will only serve to divide the country compared to the 19 percent who said it will help “unite” the country. Another 20 percent said it will not make much of a difference, and four percent expressed no opinion. Republicans are significantly more likely to believe that the proceedings will divide the country — 83 percent compared to the nine percent who said it would unite the nation. Democrats are virtually split across the board. A plurality, or 35 percent, said the trial will unite the country, followed by 31 percent who said it will not make a difference and 30 percent who said it will divide the country further. The majority...
    All Republicans in the Senate have voted to dismiss the indictment of former US President Donald Trump. It is this party unity that suggests that Trump could be acquitted of inciting the Capitol Hill riots. – Kabar Al-Jazeera Republican Senator Rand Paul proposed Tuesday and opposed the former president’s trial. Because the US Constitution does not provide for the accusation of the former president. Republican Donald Trump walked out of the White House last Wednesday. In the Democratic-led Senate, the Republicans’ proposal was rejected by 55-45 votes. But five Republicans voted against the proposal. But to convict Trump would require a referendum of at least 16 Republican senators. Despite Trump’s failure to complete the investigation in advance, the plan says he has more comprehensive control over the party. Donald Trump was the first former US president to face the charge. Rand Paul later told reporters that very few of these incidents had taken place in Washington, where failure was a real success. 45 votes died immediately after the indictment began. Democrat majority leader Chuck Schumer dismissed Republicans’ constitutional claims...
    After blocking hundreds of pieces of legislation, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is demanding Democrats let him continue his 'Grim Reaper' act. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) lost his position as Senate majority leader on Wednesday, but he and his Republican minority caucus still want to be able to obstruct every bit of progressive legislation as they have for the past few years. Vice President Kamala Harris, as president of the Senate and its tie-breaker, gives Democrats at 51 to 50 majority in the chamber. Democrats reportedly offered a bipartisan power-sharing agreement this week that would give Republicans an equal number of seats on committees, but McConnell rejected it over a demand that the new majority agree to preserve a rule requiring a 60-vote supermajority to end debate on nearly all legislation. If a simple majority of senators vote to change those rules, they could do so. Republicans hope to get Democrats to agree now that they will not alter that threshold, no matter how many bills they block. They suggested that...
    Bradley Cortright January 20, 2021 0 Comments In one of her first official acts in office, Vice President Kamala Harris is swearing in three new Democratic senators, ending six years of Republican control of the upper chamber. Hours after she made history as the first woman of color to be sworn in as vice president, Harris returned to the Capitol to swear in Sens. Jon Ossoff (D-Ga.), Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.), and Alex Padilla (D-Calif.) Ossoff and Warnock won two run-off elections in Georgia on January 5. Padilla was appointed to fill Harris’ seat in the Senate. Watch the video below: Newly inaugurated VP Harris swears in new Senators Ossoff (D-GA), Warnock (D-GA), and Padilla (D-CA) pic.twitter.com/d2emxYEBGu— Daily Caller (@DailyCaller) January 20, 2021 There will now be a 50-50 split in the Senate, with Harris able to cast the tie breaking vote, giving Democrats control of the chamber. With the new balance of power, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) will become the majority leader, and Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will become the new minority leader.  However, Schumer and McConnell are reportedly discussing a complex power-sharing agreement that will...
    Three Democrats were officially sworn in as U.S. Senators on Wednesday, hours after President Joe Biden’s inauguration, giving Democrats a majority in the Senate. California Democrat Alex Padilla will take Vice President Kamala Harris’s Senate seat, Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff will take David Perdue’s seat, and Georgia Democrat Raphael Warnock will take Kelly Loeffler’s seat. The two Georgia Senate runoff victories secured Democrats’ majority in the Senate. Harris swore the three Senate Democrats in. The Senate will now be split 50-50, with Harris, giving Democrats the tie-breaking vote. “As I’m sworn in today, know that I will be a senator for all Georgians. Whether or not you voted for me, I’ll carry your hopes and concerns to Washington,” Warnock tweeted before he was sworn in. As I’m sworn in today, know that I will be a senator for all Georgians. Whether or not you voted for me, I’ll carry your hopes and concerns to Washington. pic.twitter.com/t0yxodr9ll — Senator-Elect Reverend Raphael Warnock (@ReverendWarnock) January 20, 2021 Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff delivers a concession speech during his election night party being...
    The Democrats on Wednesday regained control of the Senate for the first time in six years. Newly inaugurated Vice President Kamala Harris, in her first official act in her constitutional role as president of the Senate, swore in Sens.-elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock — who defeated GOP Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler in Georgia’s twin Jan. 5 Senate runoff elections. HARRIS MAKES HISTORY AS SHE'S INAUGURATED AS THE NATION'S VICE PRESIDENT And the vice president — who in advance of her inauguration stepped down from her Senate seat representing California on Monday — also swore in Alex Padilla, who was appointed by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to succeed Harris in the Senate. Harris was given a standing ovation by her former colleagues in the Senate as she entered the chamber. All three new senators are making history. Warnock, 51, and Ossoff, 33, become Georgia’s first Black and first Jewish senators. Padilla, 47, becomes California’s first Latino senator. With Ossoff, Warnock and Padilla taking their oaths, the Senate is now split 50/50 between the Democrats and Republicans. But the Democrats will hold a razor-thin majority, as...
    Democrats are taking control of the Senate on Wednesday afternoon, giving the party control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. Vice President Kamala Harris, who was sworn in during the inauguration ceremony Wednesday, will administer the oath of office for Senators-elect Jon Ossoff, Alex Padilla and Raphael Warnock on Wednesday. Ossoff and Warnock won their runoff elections in Georgia earlier this month, and Padilla was appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to replace Harris in the Senate.How to watch Harris administer the oath of office for Warnock, Ossoff and Padilla What: Vice President Kamala Harris swears in Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff of Georgia, and Harris' replacement former California Secretary of State Alex Padilla Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 Time: 4:30 p.m. ET Online stream: Live on CBSN in the player above and on your mobile of streaming device  Follow: Live Inauguration Day updates on CBSNews.com With Ossoff, Padilla and Warnock seated, Democrats will hold the narrowest possible majority in the Senate. The balance will be 50 Democrats to 50 Republicans, with...
    Democrats will be taking control of the Senate on Wednesday afternoon, giving the party control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. Vice President Kamala Harris, who was sworn in during the inauguration ceremony Wednesday, will administer the oath of office for Senators-elect Jon Ossoff, Alex Padilla and Raphael Warnock Wednesday afternoon.  Ossoff and Warnock won their runoff elections in Georgia earlier this month, and Padilla was appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to replace Harris in the Senate. With Ossoff, Padilla and Warnock seated, Democrats will hold the narrowest possible majority in the Senate. The balance will be 50 Democrats to 50 Republicans, with Harris breaking any tie. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell have discussed a arrangement based on the power-sharing deal implemented in 2001, the last time there was a 50-50 split in the Senate. Vice President Dick Cheney was in office then, giving Republicans the narrow majority. Schumer and McConnell met on Tuesday afternoon, and Schumer, according to a spokesperson, "expressed that the fairest, most reasonable and easiest path forward...
    The future of Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte hangs on the crucial vote of confidence expected Tuesday evening in the Senate, where he must find a new government majority after being released in the midst of a pandemic by Matteo Renzi and his troops. He took a first step on Monday by gaining confidence in the Chamber of Deputies, where the two pillars of his coalition, the Democratic Party (PD, center-left) and the 5 Star Movement (M5S, anti-system), have the majority . He is now attempting the double in the upper house, where he lacks on paper fifteen votes to reach an absolute majority. Giuseppe Conte, a law professor who himself has never rubbed shoulders with universal suffrage, has embarked on a vote hunt to try to compensate for the departure of Mr. Renzi and his fifteen senators. During his speech in the Senate, he wished “only pro-Europeans in the majority”, saying “no to nationalists and to those who have sovereignist aspirations”. “The test of truth is being held today in the...
                              Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Wednesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 351,590; Tuesday, 353,621; Wednesday, 357,385.   The United States has surpassed 21 million confirmed cases of COVID-19. For the first time in six years, the Senate is on the verge of changing hands, and perhaps reshaping the trajectory of national governance.   Democrats are on the precipice of pulling off two momentous victories in a pair of Senate runoff contests in Georgia, delivering a sharp rebuke to President TrumpDonald TrumpWarnock defeats Loeffler in Georgia Senate runoff The Memo: Georgia voters deliver blow to Trump Eric Trump warns...
    Voters in Georgia will head to the polls on Tuesday after two months of hard-fought campaigning for the closely watched Senate runoff elections. The outcome will decide which party holds the majority in the Senate, and so determine how effectively President-elect Joe Biden will be able to implement his legislative agenda. Republican incumbent Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler are facing well-funded Democratic opponents, Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock. Georgia was a critical state in the presidential election, and was narrowly won by Mr. Biden, a result that was affirmed again and again by an initial count and two additional recounts.  President Trump has zeroed in on the state in his fruitless effort to overturn the election results with baseless claims of fraud. In a phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger on Saturday, audio of which was obtained by CBS News, Mr. Trump attempted to pressure Raffesnperger to "find" more than 11,000 votes so he could win the state.  "The people of Georgia are angry, the people in the country are angry," Mr. Trump can be heard saying on...
    President-elect Joe Biden speaks in Atlanta, Monday, Jan. 4, 2021, as he campaigns for Georgia Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate, Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff.Carolyn Kaster | AP President-elect Joe Biden went to Atlanta on Monday to do more than boost the two Democrats in Tuesday's runoff Senate races. As he stumped for Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, Biden stressed that votes in Georgia will ripple beyond the Peach State to shape the success of the incoming president's agenda nationwide. "By electing Jon and the reverend, you can break the gridlock that has gripped Washington and this nation," Biden said. "With their votes in the Senate, we'll be able to make the progress we need to make on jobs and health care and justice and the environment and so many other things." If Democrats Ossoff and Warnock beat Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, respectively, Biden's party will control the Senate for the next two years. One GOP win means Republicans hold the chamber — and more sway over what policy emerges from Washington. Biden will sit in the...
    Jon Ossoff makes things crystal clear for Georgians in this new ad: Any help coming from this Senate is not going to be for the people who are hurting the most. "When this pandemic hit, millions of Georgians like me had to file for unemployment," the Georgia worker on camera says. "We needed our senator's help. But for David Perdue we weren't the priority. Senator Perdue voted to give hundreds of millions to big corporations, even if if they lay people off. But he fought against the $1,200 stimulus check for workers and supported cutting our unemployment benefits. Even at a moment like this, David Perdue is there for his donors but not for us." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, with the full backing of Perdue, is blocking a COVID relief deal that had support from Senate Democrats, Senate Republicans, and even the White House. Without his majority, he can't hold the nation hostage. If you want help, if you want a $1,200 or $2,000 check, make sure Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff get elected. If McConnell stays in charge,...
    SAVANNAH, Georgia — Vice President Mike Pence charged during a rally on Friday that Georgians should “stay in the fight” and work to reelect Sens. David Perdue (R-GA) and Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) to keep the Senate Republican majority. “We need the Peach State to defend the Senate majority,” the vice president said during his speech. He added that the road to the Senate majority “runs right through the state of Georgia.” Pence asked rhetorically, “Are you with me?” The crowd of several hundred Trump supporters erupted in loud applause. Loeffler and Perdue’s reelection plays a pivotal role in keeping the Senate Republican majority. If both Loeffler and Perdue were to lose their January Senate runoff elections, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), the likely next vice president, would become the Senate’s tie-breaking vote. “A Republican Senate majority could be the last line of defense” against the Democrats’ leftist agenda, Pence said. Pence described Perdue as “one of the greatest allies of our administration in Washington, DC.” He called Loeffler “one of the most important conservative voices” on Capitol Hill. Pence cheered his...
    Joe Biden revealed Tuesday that he will not find spots for progressive Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in his Cabinet, claiming he needs their voices and votes in the U.S. Senate. 'One thing is really critical – taking someone out of the Senate, taking someone out of the House, particularly for a person of consequence, is a really difficult decision that would have to be made,' Biden said during an interview with NBC News' Lester Holt. 'I have a very ambitious, very progressive agenda. and it's going to take really strong leaders in the House and Senate to get it done,' Biden continued in his first interview since he declared victory. Holt asked Biden if he would welcome any of his former Democratic primary rivals into his administration – specifically pointing to Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont. 'Well, I've talked to them,' the former vice president said. 'We already have significant representation among progressives in our administration, but there's nothing really off the table.' Joe Biden said Tuesday that he will not tap progressives...
    Democratic leaders of the state Senate claimed a major victory Monday saying their party’s candidates have secured a veto-proof majority — potentially giving them more leverage with fellow Democrat Gov. Andrew Cuomo in crafting the state budget, tax policy and other legislation. Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart Cousins (D-Yonkers) and Deputy Majority Leader Michael Gianaris (D-Astoria) took a victory lap during an Albany press conference. “We know that on election night many people wrote us off, they said it was a big red wave, and they were already predicting our shrinking majority, and as we know the red wave turned out to really be more of a red mirage,” Stewart-Cousins said. Potential clashes with Cuomo include whether or how much to raise taxes on the wealthy to help close a massive budget deficit next year triggered by plummeting revenues during the coronavirus pandemic. The governor is resisting raising taxes while waiting to see if Washington delivers another pandemic package to aid cash-strapped state and local governments. “Everything is on the table,” said Stewart-Cousins, when asked about tax hikes and...
    WASHINGTON – After six years as a minority, Democrats have an uphill but real chance to wrest control of the Senate from Republicans in January, and more opportunities in 2022. However, as states become more clearly defined by party, it is becoming more difficult for Democrats to obtain and maintain a majority. Thanks to this month’s elections, Democrats will hold all four Senate seats from Arizona next year – where the trend for both parties is almost the same – and Colorado, which is increasingly Democratic. If by the second round of January they win both seats in Georgia, which has recently leaned towards them, they will command the Senate thanks to the tiebreaker vote of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and the House would be 50-50. Yet while Democrats have made these and other gains since losing control in the 2014 election, they have lost the foundations of their former majority. Gone are the seats of Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Dakota, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina and West Virginia, all of which leaned toward...
    With 50 seats, the Republicans have an advantage they intend to consolidate.
    Senate Republicans Wednesday secured their 50th seat in the quest to hang onto the majority with a win in Alaska by incumbent Sen. Dan Sullivan.  One more victory will give Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., another term as majority leader and relegate Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and the Democrats to the minority once again. Republicans have two shots at winning the 51st seat with two runoff races in Georgia in January.  Control of the Senate will hinge on whether Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., will beat 33-year-old Democratic media executive Jon Ossoff and whether Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., will defeat the Rev. Raphael Warnock, pastor of the Atlanta church where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. preached. Follow below for more updates on the Georgia Senate race. Mobile users click here. 
    Alaska Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan's reelection Tuesday has shifted the future of the Senate majority 4,500 miles southeast, to Georgia, where a rare double runoff contest for two open Senate seats will determine which party controls the gavel in January. Democrats remain in the minority with 48 seats unless they can win these two seats. Voters will pick winners in these Senate races in a Jan. 5 runoff. Sullivan’s reelection has secured the GOP 50 seats when the Senate convenes for the 117th Congress in January, but that won't be good enough if presumptive President-elect Joe Biden takes office later that month. Kamala Harris would cast the tie-breaking vote as vice president and president of the Senate. That's why Republicans will focus heavily on holding the Georgia Senate seats. Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat who hopes to be running the Senate next year, is hardly giving up. “When it comes to the Senate,” Schumer said Tuesday, “It’s not over.” Georgia’s election history suggests the two Republican candidates have the advantage, partly because voter turnout is typically...
    CONTROL of the US Senate likely will not be decided until two runoffs are held in Georgia in early January. The runoffs will likely determine the balance of power in Washington. ⚠️ Follow our US election 2020 live blog for the latest news & updates 5Jon Ossoff speaks to reporters as he rallies supporters for a runoff against Republican Senator David PerdueCredit: AP:Associated Press Who won the Senate and House? The next Senate will include 48 Republicans and 48 Democrats following the November 3 election, with four seats up for grabs. Seats in North Carolina and Alaska are too early too call, but Republicans have the edge in both states. There will be two runoffs in Georgia to fill the final two vacancies. 5Senator David Perdue speaks during a campaign stop at Peachtree Dekalb Airport in AtlantaCredit: AP:Associated Press A 50-50 split in the Senate would mean that future Vice President Kamala Harris would be able to break any possible ties. The Democrats were able to stay in control of the House of Representatives, so two wins in Georgia would...
    Donald Trump announced Sunday evening that he is putting Representative Doug Collins in charge of the effort to recount ballots in Georgia after Joe Biden became the projected winner there by only 10,000 votes. 'During the coming recount, we are confident we will find evidence of improperly harvested ballots and other irregularities that will prove that President Trump won Georgia fairly again on his way to re-election as President,' Collins said in a statement released by Trump's campaign team on Sunday. 'Georgians deserve a free and open process, and they will get one.' The recount comes as part of a concerted effort from Trump to show that the election was 'rigged' and 'stolen' by Democrats. 'Republicans stand by the ideal that every eligible voter should be able to vote legally and have it be counted,' Collin said. The 16 Electoral College votes in Georgia, a state that went red in 2016 by 5 percentage points, were projected for Biden. GOP Georgia Representative Doug Collins was put in charge of the recount effort in his home state as President Donald...
    Top Republicans are warning that GOP control of the Senate is coming down to two expected runoff elections in early January in Georgia.  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Memo: Trump hits out as tide moves for Biden Senate Republicans sit quietly as Trump challenges vote counts George Floyd's brother: Biden 'deserves a chance to prove himself worthy' MORE (R-Ky.) and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham to donate 0K to Trump's legal defense fund News media's underperformance a drag on the electoral process Biden win would leave GOP poised for 2024 comeback MORE (R-S.C.), in separate press conferences on Friday, warned that which party controls the Senate is still in flux.  "I'm not certain I'm the majority leader yet, as you all may have noticed that will be determined in Georgia," McConnell told reporters in Kentucky.  "It makes a big difference who wins the two seats in Georgia. If the Democrats were to win the two seats Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerHarry Reid rips Lindsey Graham over Trump: 'He went to the dark side' after McCain died Democrats...
    Mississippi state flag: Voters approve magnolia design in Ballot Measure 3 Chipotle Has Seen Staff Shortages After Some Employees Tested Positive For COVID-19 Congressional Democrats’ high hopes dashed as GOP clings to Senate majority, scores unexpected gains in the House Congressional Democrats awoke Wednesday to a political debacle despite big optimism heading into the elections, as Republicans continued to cling to their Senate majority and are on track to make unexpected gains in the House. © Bryan Woolston/Reuters Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), accompanied by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, holds a post election news conference as he declares victory, in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., November 3, 2020. As the presidential race headed toward a photo finish that could take days to sort out, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) faced another political letdown that, so far, resembled their failure in 2016 when President Trump first won election.  In the highly anticipated Senate matches, Republicans scored easier than expected victories in Iowa, Montana, and South Carolina while establishing very large leads...
    A handful of too-close-to-call races in battleground states are expected to tip the balance in the fight for control of the United States Senate. At least for now, it appears that Republicans are on track to hold their majority. The key racesMichigan: Republican John James is running ahead of the Democratic incumbent Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.) 49.3% to 48.8% with 92% of the votes reported, according to the Associated Press. Should James, an Iraq War veteran, win in the Rust Belt state it would be a major pickup for the Republicans, who don't normally play offense there despite President Trump's victory in the state in 2016. James trailed Peters in the polls by 5.4% coming into the election, but that deficit appears to have evaporated. With roughly 10% of the vote still left to be counted, the race has not been called. It's possible that outstanding votes are primarily made up of absentee ballots which have tended to favor Democrats, so the race could still turn in Peters' favor. North Carolina: Despite doubt that he could retain...
    McConnel spent the past two years proudly blocking more than 400 pieces of legislation passed by the House. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has won a seventh term, according to an Associated Press projection, defeating Democrat Amy McGrath. Kentucky voters kept the Republican despite his historic record of obstruction. It is unclear whether he will remain Senate Majority Leader, as control of the U.S. Senate has not been determined yet. McConnell put the odds of a GOP majority at "50-50" last week. McConnell has spent much of the past two years blocking popular House-passed legislation from coming up in the Senate and pushing to confirm Donald Trump's conservative judges to lifetime appointments.
    Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court Monday evening by the Senate in a 52-48 vote - with Republican Susan Collins crossing the aisle to vote against her. Donald Trump's third nominee was not in the chamber to watch the roll call vote, which allows her to join the eight justices on Tuesday morning, and potentially to decide on cases about voting before the November 3 election.  Senate president pro tempore Chuck Grassley declared her confirmation at 8.06pm.   Her nomination transforms the court to a 6-3 conservative majority and comes after fierce opposition from Democrats, whose presidential nominee Joe Biden has resisted pressure to promise to pack the court if he wins - but who says he will order a commission on reforming the high court.  Before the final vote she was praised by Republican majority leader Mitch McConnell who said: 'By every account, the Supreme Court is getting not just an outstanding lawyer but a fantastic person.   'This is one of the brilliant, admired and well-qualified nominees in our lifetime,' he said. She will be the only...
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