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    Whoopi Goldberg has implied men have no right to comment on abortions as she slammed Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Thursday for a remark he made while debating Roe v Wade.  'The fetus has an interest in having a life,' Alito said Wednesday during oral arguments in the case of Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health - where Mississippi is attempting to strike down a lower court's blocking of its 15-week abortion ban.  'And that doesn't change, does it, from the point before viability to the point after viability? There are those who say that the rights of personhood should be considered to have taken hold at a point when the fetus acquires certain independent characteristics. But viability is dependent on medical technology and medical practice. It has changed. It may continue to change.' Goldberg, speaking on The View, reamed Alito, arguing that as a male he has no idea what a fetus wants.  'Do any of you men have any eggs or the possibility of carrying a fetus? How dare you talk about what a fetus wants? You have no idea,'...
    Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for CNN https://www.mediaite.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Cuomo-Police.mp3 Chris Cuomo paused his Sirius XM radio show on Thursday morning to speak to his “friendly neighborhood police.” After the show came back from a break, Cuomo’s producer hosted the show for six and a half minutes, explaining that she did not know where Cuomo was. When he returned to the air, he explained that he had to talk to police officers. “Sorry about that, had to see my friendly neighborhood police because some people don’t know how to act,” he said. “Anyway, so everything is good.” Cuomo did not elaborate on the incident. He has been making headlines this week following his indefinite suspension from CNN, which could explain any extra attention he has received from his neighbors. It would not be the first time the CNN mainstay has had problems with a neighbor. In April 2020, while Cuomo was infected with Covid-19, a Long Island bicyclist confronted him for being outside amid his battle with the virus. “Sometimes he’s scary stupid,” the 65-year-old man, who asked to be referred to as David, told The...
    ANXIETY is just as common in kids as it is in adults, with the root causes far-reaching.  Five children in a classroom of 30 are likely to have a mental health problem such as anxiety, according to the Children’s Society. 1Children need reassurance because anxiety "thrives off avoidance", exerpts sayCredit: Alamy Parents became particularly worried about this during the Covid pandemic, when life and its routines were turned upside down for kids, too. Sometimes it can be difficult to tease apart what’s normal for a child to be anxious about, and what appears to be harmful to their wellbeing. Dr Angharad Rudkin, resident psychologist for financial services and life insurance provider Legal and General, said: "Every child will experience anxiety at some point.  “It is an essential part of the growing up process and helps children to understand themselves and the world better. “Feeling a bit of anxiety and learning strategies for dealing with it can be an essential life skill." The NHS says symptoms of anxiety in children include becoming clingy and tearful, difficulty sleeping, wetting the bed and...
    You may not be out going door-to-door to fight COVID-19 in your neighborhood. Then again … you may be. People certainly are, and to great effect. But whether you’re just trying to keep safe in your local grocery, or going up against screaming meme-ers at your local school board, what the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) posted on Tuesday could come in handy.  In a new advisory (.pdf), Surgeon General Vivek Murthy urges “all Americans to help slow the spread of health misinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.” Murthy warns that not only does this misinformation spread confusion and distrust, it represents its own threat to public health that only compounds the effects of the disease. At a time when everyone needs to pull together in a “whole-of-society effort” misinformation—whether accidentally or deliberately spread—is tearing us apart. As an example of the last effects of misinformation, Murthy points out how “a poorly designed study” in the 1990s lead to the false link between childhood vaccines and autism. That false claim, adopted by anti-vaxx forces and those out to victimize communities for profit,...
    Stephen Maturen/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.When Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen was inaugurated for a second term last May, then–Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other senior officials sent high-level messages to congratulate her. It was the first time a US secretary of state had done so, and the news landed with a thud in Beijing, which has considered independent Taiwan a “breakaway province” for more than 70 years and regularly declares its intention to annex the island. In a statement, China’s Defense Ministry said that Pompeo had “seriously endangered relations between the two countries and two militaries and seriously damaged peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait.” For decades, the United States had preferred to help Taiwan “quietly” so as to not anger Beijing, said Lev Nachman, a fellow at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. Taiwan policy was also mostly bipartisan—both parties agreed to the One China policy, a purposefully vague formulation that acknowledges China’s claim to Taiwan, but without taking a...
    (CNN)As a pediatrician, mother and grandmother, I know that kids generally do not look forward to getting shots, no matter how important vaccines are for their health. With the Covid-19 vaccine on the horizon for children ages 5-11, millions of parents may be contemplating a conversation with their child about getting immunized. Moira SzilagyiChildren have already heard a lot about this vaccine. And they probably have questions. Unlike most other vaccines we routinely recommend for children and adolescents, the Covid-19 vaccine has dominated the news, social media, and discussions that may be happening around the dinner table. My best advice is to meet your children where they are. This is true for any topic, but it is an especially great technique when talking with your children about their health. Don't hesitate to give accurate answers to their questions. Avoid blanket directives like, "Because you have to have your shot." Your child may fill in the gaps with fearful thoughts, so it's better to give more complete explanations, and to talk with your child about why vaccines are important in...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — As federal health leaders mull over children between the ages of 5 and 11 getting the COVID-19 vaccine, KDKA took a look at how you can discuss this topic with young children. Doctors say it is rather easy. Health leaders say adults are the ones who make it harder than it needs to be. READ MORE: State Senate Approves Bill Making It A Crime To Run Away From An Arresting Officer“Don’t make it a big deal,” said Dr. Gary Swanson, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at AHN. “Answer questions they have but don’t give them too much information. Kids are very reactive to how parents come across.” So, if you are anxious, your child may follow suit. Dr. Swanson said the best thing you can do is to keep it simple. “Most kids are worried about getting a shot. They are not worried about what’s in the shot. They are worried about the shot itself,” Dr. Swanson said. Allegheny County Health Director Dr. Debra Bogen said you should address what your children have heard about the vaccine....
    (CNN)An 11-year-old girl was petrified -- her word -- of needles, so much so that she didn't want to talk about it with me. She couldn't talk about it without becoming visibly upset. Her heart raced, her breathing became rapid, and her stomach hurt when she tried to answer my questions. So, we backed up and started from the beginning. I first had her look at cartoon images of children getting vaccines. When I asked her how it felt to do that, she rolled her eyes and reminded me that it wasn't real. Next, I had her look at photos of medical needles. She reported that she didn't like the pictures, but she could handle looking at them. We continued this gradual approach until she gave "vaccines" to an orange (parental supervision required even with toy needles). What she was doing is exposure therapy, learning to tolerate her discomfort and gradually build up to getting her own vaccine. Using exposure to cope with needle phobia requires time and professional guidance, but many adults are eager to get the Covid-19 vaccine...
    (CNN)There is a moment in the beginning of the new book from Christine Pride and Jo Piazza that is written from the perspective of a 14-year-old Black boy.He is having a nightmare about being shot by police officers and imagines the school picture his mom would use when he dies and his death would become news. The work is fictional, but the writing allows you to see the world through a different lens.Throughout their novel, uncomfortable events happen which start exactly the kind of conversation Pride and Piazza wanted their book, "We Are Not Like Them," to tackle. The story centers around a White woman named Jen and a Black woman named Riley, who are forced to deal with race after Jen's police officer husband is involved in the shooting of a Black teen. The two used their own friendship -- Pride is Black and Piazza is White -- as a starting point. Read More"For us, writing together as a Black woman and a White woman, and as friends who became friends late in life, we had never talked about...
    (CNN)Children are watching -- and it's not just behaviors like kindness and empathy that can make an impression. They also see how their parents handle money, for better or worse."I wish I was taught how to pay bills, and the importance of paying them on time," said Amiyrah Martin, a mother of three from Columbus, Ohio. "As parents, we miss the opportunity to not only be transparent about the bills that come into our home but show kids how those bills are paid." Other parents told me they wished their parents had taught them the basics of budgeting, savings and credit cards, and more advanced topics such as investing, mortgages, managing taxes, negotiating salaries and calculating retirement savings. Why are money conversations not happening? Shame is a common reason.Better ways to talk with your tween or teen when they go silentRead MoreShame or embarrassment about financial mistakes can prevent parents from having positive money conversations with their children, said Monica Eaton, a certified financial education instructor and founder of Alconbury Press, a media company focused on financial literacy for kids.Eaton...
    Socially distanced kindergarten students wait for their parents to pick them up on the first day of in-person learning at Maurice Sendak Elementary School in Los Angeles. Jae C. Hong/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.As kids across the country settle into the rhythm of outbreaks and school closures during the second pandemic school year, a staggering number of children are having to do so without their parents or caregivers. A study in the academic journal Pediatrics, published Friday, found that more than 140,000 children lost caregivers or parents to COVID-19 between April 2020 and June 2021. CDC epidemiologist Susan Hillis, a lead author of the study, told NPR that that number has risen to roughly 175,000 today.  Making this more heartbreaking is the uneven way the affliction has been felt by Black, Latino, and indigenous children. Researchers in the Pediatrics study found that American Indian/Alaska Native children were 4.5 times more likely to lose a parent or caregiver to COVID compared to white children. Black children were nearly two and a half times...
    (CNN)It's what parents around the country have been waiting for: Pfizer and BioNTech announced Thursday they are asking the US Food and Drug Administration for an emergency use authorization for their Covid-19 vaccine for children ages 5 to 11. Heres what having a Covid-19 vaccine for children might mean for your kidsIt may take some weeks for the data to make its way through the FDA's protocols and be green-lit for use in children by the agency and then the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In the meantime, parent's minds are already buzzing about how to make plans for their child to get a shot and what to tell them about the experience.CNN reached out to pediatrician and child development expert Dr. David Hill to ask him questions that parents -- and kids -- will want answered. Hill is the former chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Communications and Media, and is currently a co-host on the AAP's flagship podcast, "Pediatrics on Call."This conversation has been lightly edited for clarity.Read MoreCNN: Do you think children between...
    As Gabby Petito news coverage continues, one expert is sharing how parents can speak to their children about the case in age-appropriate manners. Stephanie Samar, a New York-based clinical psychologist who specializes in mood and anxiety disorders in children across the lifespan, spoke with Fox News on the subject.  "We're not sure what exactly happened between Gabby and her fiancé… there’s facts being reported by the news, and then there’s social media investigations going on," said Samar, who also guides adults who are parenting children with emotional and behavioral dysregulation. A sign is seen during Gabby Petito's memorial service in Holbrook, New York, U.S., September 26, 2021.   (REUTERS/Jeenah Moon) Since Petito’s reported disappearance and death, users have taken to TikTok and YouTube channels to dissect their own versions of the case – many offering speculation, which Samar said teens could be interacting with. CHILD KIDNAPPINGS MOST LIKELY HAPPEN DURING THESE TIMES OF DAY "Because it’s bled into their domains, I think it’s important [that] parents check in," she added. Samar offered guidance for families looking to navigate conversations with children surrounding...
    Check out our must-buy plant-based cookbooks! Learn more Buying ethically and sustainably matters. Adults are usually able to talk about the serious issues surrounding slave labor, sweatshops, and how mass consumerism is destroying the environment. However, while these are all important topics, they may be a little heavy to throw on children.  How can we talk to young kids about making purchases that respect the people sewing, building, or manufacturing them? It’s completely possible, so let’s break it down.  Simplify Things Throwing big words around will only confuse kids. Ethical consumerism is a relatively simple concept, so it can be broken down to be digestible for your children.  Here are a few examples of what to say to children to explain why shopping for the environment and the people in it is important:  “Someone has worked hard to make everything we buy, so we should respect the things that we have.” “Some things we buy make a lot of bad pollution, especially for the people who make them, so you need to make good choices about what...
    SOUTH LOOP — Though COVID-19 has been dominating conversations across the globe, children going through this crisis are rarely giving them the opportunity to express themselves. One local organization, Once Upon A Time Capsule, is helping kids find their voice. More than 35 youth-related groups across the city collaborated on time capsule projects with children ages 5 to 12, the majority of them kids of color. Earlier this month, several kids participated in a time capsule event at the Adler Planetarium, where they put pen to paper to share their thoughts and feelings about the tumultuous year. Once Upon A Time Capsule co-founder Stacey Gillett and her partner, Stephanie Hodges, spent the past year talking with pediatric psychologists for guidance on how to give kids awareness of all the complexity they’ve navigated since the start of the pandemic. “These are predominantly time capsules of stories and memories, and this is a way of elevating them,” Gillett said. For Edward Cheng, his wife and his three children — Lily, 12; Maddie, 11; and Nate, 9 — the past 18...
    Syracuse University assistant professor Jenn M. Jackson became the latest pundit to tweet an unpopular take about 9/11 over the weekend by asking why so many "white pundits" still talk about the terror attack 20 years later. One of those she singled out was Andy Card, former President George W. Bush's chief of staff, who first told the commander in chief that America was under attack. "It's twenty years since 9/11 and I'm still really disturbed by how many white pundits and correspondents talk about it," Jackson, who is also a contributor at Teen Vogue, according to her Twitter bio, tweeted. "I'm watching Andy Card and [Former Homeland Security Secretary] Jeh Johnson on MSNBC. Card just said that 9/11 was the first time that Americans ever felt fear. He said that it was the last morning we woke up without fear and that the 'terrorists' succeeded in introducing us to fear." ICONIC 9/11 PHOTOS AND THE PHOTOGRAPHERS WHO SHOT THEM: HERE ARE THEIR STORIES Jackson followed up by tweeting that the 9/11 terror attacks were an assault on America's "heteropatriarchal...
    The Nation's Elie Mystal, this week on The Brief September promises to be exhaustingly jam packed. In Congress, we’ve got, well, all of this:  xSEPTEMBER ON CAPITOL HILL• Gov’t funding expires 9/30 • Debt limit fight looms• Flood insurance/surface transp lapse• House 9/27 infrastructure deadline• Dems write $3.5T bill• Abortion rights vote• Ida/UI/eviction aid?• Jan. 6 committeehttps://t.co/8q0e3hcYQM— Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur) September 7, 2021 Democrats have a jam-packed to-do list, but conservative Democrats Joe Manchin of West Virginia, and Kirsten Synema of Arizona are restless and cranky. What can Democrats actually accomplish in a Senate where their margin of error is zero? Daily Kos senior writer Joan McCarter will join us for the first half of the show to talk about all of this.  Meanwhile, Texas has just passed the nation’s most restrictive anti-abortion law, and the Supreme Court allowed it to be enforced while the law works its way up the court system. For the second half of the show, Elie Mystal will join us. He is the justice correspondent for The Nation. and one of the most interesting and fun guests in the...
    Sign up here to get our updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. Not to be the bearer of bad news, but we’ll just say it: summer is almost over. Soon it will be getting colder in Minnesota, and that means more gathering with people inside, with big holidays on the way. For many this year, these events will come with an unpleasant twist: the prospect of social friction between people who are vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus and those who are not, especially in light of the rapidly spreading delta variant. Experts overwhelmingly agree, the best way to stop the virus is vaccination.  Three COVID-19 vaccines have been declared safe and effective by the Food and Drug Administration. Yet nine months into the vaccination effort, just 65 percent of Minnesotans age 12 and older — those eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19 — have been fully vaccinated against the virus. As the prospect of sharing a holiday dinner table draws nearer, MinnPost talked to medical professionals...
    More On: khloe kardashian Lamar Odom: Tristan Thompson feud ‘could have turned ugly’ Tristan Thompson paints daughter True’s nails: ‘Gotta keep my babygirl right’ Lamar Odom shades Tristan Thompson after Khloé Kardashian Instagram spat Tristan Thompson seems to threaten Lamar Odom on Khloé Kardashian’s Instagram Khloé Kardashian wants to discuss race and “privilege” with her daughter so that she doesn’t grow up in an insulated “bubble.” The “Keeping Up With the Kardashians” star said that she consistently works to educate herself so that her 3-year-old, True, will understand the world beyond their “privileged” community. “I will be always learning and trying to do the best I can do as being her mom,” Kardashian, 37, said on the “Role Models” podcast. “I’m obviously not a woman of color, but I do want her to be exposed to as much inclusion but variety as possible.” She continued, “I don’t want her living in a bubble thinking, because we do have this very privileged life, I want her to know all types of life and all types of living and be very...
    Russian Olympic athletes have reportedly been instructed by the Kremlin on how to answer questions on Black Lives Matter and other sensitive topics, a Russian news outlet reported. The athletes have been given specific instructions on what to say on topics like Crimea, harassment, the Black Lives Matter movement and doping abuse, presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov told the Russian news agency TASS on Wednesday. “The Kremlin supports such an initiative, but it will be up to each individual athlete whether to use it or not,” Peskov said.  “Athletes are not politicians,” Peskov said, according to TASS. “Unfortunately, many people want to make politicians out of them and drag them into politics, they eventually get into complicated situations,” he added.  The China playbook: “A document prepared by the Russian Olympic Committee and distributed to the athletes reportedly directed them how to answer journalists’ “provocative” questions about political issues.” https://t.co/nXzYHURy0k — Emily Feng 冯哲芸 (@EmilyZFeng) July 15, 2021 When asked about the Black Lives Matter movement, the guidelines encourage athletes to answer that opinions are an individual’s personal business but “the...
    I always enjoy Meteor Blades’ post about July 4, which highlights Frederick Douglass' iconic speech, "The Meaning of July 4th for the Negro," delivered in Rochester, New York, in 1852. The speech described the alienation from July 4, and from America more broadly, that enslaved people and African Americans in general felt. Although the most often-quoted section discusses that sense of alienation, it is also important to remember Douglass' conclusion to the speech: Allow me to say, in conclusion, notwithstanding the dark picture I have this day presented, of the state of the nation, I do not despair of this country. There are forces in operation which must inevitably work the downfall of slavery. "The arm of the Lord is not shortened," and the doom of slavery is certain. I, therefore, leave off where I began, with hope. While drawing encouragement from "the Declaration of Independence," the great principles it contains, and the genius of American Institutions, my spirit is also cheered by the obvious tendencies of the age. Douglass remained optimistic about the future despite the reality that in 1852,...
    A new documentary tells the harrowing untold story of the 168 airmen who were freed from a Nazi concentration camp during World War II only told by the US, UK and other allied governments that their ordeal never happened. Documentary maker and grandson of one of the airmen, Mike Dorsey, has shared with DailyMailTV footage of his movie about the astonishing story of the American, Canadian, British, Australian, and New Zealand airmen's ordeal. Though all the military men are now dead, Dorsey managed to get many of them to tell their shocking tale on camera over the past ten years, which will finally be revealed in full in documentary, Lost Airmen of Buchenwald. In 1940 the brave servicemen parachuted from their doomed aircrafts behind enemy lines in Nazi-occupied France, and were taken in by the French Resistance. They were captured when infamous Gestapo double agent Jacques Desoubrie sold them out, and instead of being taken to a prisoner of war camp they were trucked to Buchenwald – where prison guards told inmates 'the only way you leave is through the...
    We scatter clues to our personal brand all over Daily Kos, through usernames, signature lines, and avatars. Usernames are permanent, but avatars and sig lines can be changed as often as we wish to suit our mood of the moment. I felt judged the first time I noticed a sig line—it was Meteor Blades’, and reading it was like being spoken to privately: “Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.” After reading it often, though, I viewed the message as an encouragement that reflects the heart of Daily Kos: Don’t just talk about what you believe, take action! Perhaps my dichotomous reactions are why his was the only one I could recall off-hand when I decided to write about sig lines. If usernames are labels, and avatars are images, sig lines are our voices conveying individual cadence, tone, and syntax. By elaborating on our politics, professions, and values, they offer a quick punch of personal disclosure. The sig line “Watch out or I'll go get my shovel and...
    A Connecticut elementary school hosted a seminar for parents encouraging them to talk to their kids about progressive views on gender and sexuality. "The assumption that sex equals gender is millenia (sic) old but if you look at the history of the trans community, as well as the existence of intersex people throughout history this myth starts to shed its authority," one of the slides for the presentation reads. VIRGINIA COUNTY'S LATEST BLOW-UP IS PARENTAL RIGHTS AFTER CHRISTIAN STUDENT PLACED IN TINY ROOM The program defines gender identity as "one’s own understanding of their gender or lack thereof." Examples included "genderqueer, intergender, female, demigirl, male, agender, transmasculine" and more. The Parents Defending Education group, which opposes "indoctrination in the classroom," reported that parents in attendance were told "gender is malleable" and that "sex is assigned but ultimately is determined by the individual." Critics are concerned that elementary school students are too young for such topics. And although parental rights advocates around the country have said discussions about gender and sexuality should be had in the home, between parents and their...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- Juneteenth was the day that the news that slavery had ended finally reached people in Texas. It's a conversation that until recently many families haven't had with their children.In the mid-1800s, the world's largest commodity was cotton. America's economic growth depended largely on slavery."The reason that Southerners fought so hard to maintain the status quo was because of the free labor," expressed Delores Nochi Cooper, coordinator of the Berkeley Juneteenth Festival.June 19, 1865, marks the end of slavery in America. Aside from African Americans, it's a conversation that many other families don't have. So how do you start the conversation with your children? Many suggest starting by opening some minds.WATCH: Our America: Meet Opal Lee, the grandmother of JuneteenthEMBED More News Videos In honor of Juneteenth, we're telling stories of what Black freedom means today, from a 94-year-old's quest for a national holiday to the fight for reparations to cultural celebrations. Watch "Our America: Black Freedom." Marcus Books in Oakland specializes in titles by and about black people. There are books for every age on Juneteenth."You can...
    Parents and guardians might be hesitant to bring up something scary like an earthquake, especially with younger children, said Laura Montoya, owner of the Dandelion School in Brentwood. But, she said, having those conversations is important. If kids have an understanding of what’s going on, “that really makes a difference on how a disaster might affect them in the short and the long term, and their ability to recover,” said Sarah Thompson, director of U.S. Emergencies for Save the Children. It’s important that the information and preparation are age appropriate. Too much front-loading may be overwhelming for a young child, whereas sanitizing the situation may frustrate older children, Montoya said. Here’s a look at how to prepare your children for an earthquake, whether it’s teaching them earthquake science with Jell-O or making sure their comfort items are in their emergency supply pack. Unshaken This article is part of the Los Angeles Times guide to earthquake readiness and resilience. Earthquakes are a fact of life in Southern California. Here’s what you need to know. How ready are...
    Pat Mazzera/Getty Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Roughly three months ago, Evanna Hu realized something had to change. For months, she and other Asian Americans working in the national security field had heard a startling number of anecdotes about a climate of fear and hostility toward people of Asian heritage. Approval for security clearances were “taking a lot longer” for some government employees and contractors. At the State Department, more Asian American diplomats are facing restrictions on where they can serve and what positions they can hold—a process that has grown so dispiriting that one employee told CNN, “It helps immensely to change one’s last name.” For Hu, the chief executive of an artificial intelligence company that does business with the Defense Department, she began noticing microaggressions and “not-so-micro aggressions” in her interactions with government officials. “There was always this initial skepticism of my citizenship and my loyalty,” she recalled. “I finally got really fed up with it.” She turned to several...
    It was a year ago Tuesday when George Floyd entered Cup Foods in South Minneapolis and bought a pack of cigarettes with a suspected counterfeit $20 bill. What happened in the minutes that followed would be seen around the globe. A Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck well after his body went lifeless. The 46-year-old man’s death on Memorial Day felt personal to many. It opened up old wounds in those who had themselves felt helpless while encountering police. It sparked anger and frustration in those who saw years of improving race relations erased by one incident. It disappointed those who see the “thin blue line” of the justice system as an honorable institution preserving law and order. It grieved the heart of every parent who has lost a child to use of deadly force by law enforcement. What Floyd’s death — and the subsequent murder-and-manslaughter conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin — also did was get the world talking about how people treat each other and what can be done to make things better. The Pioneer...
    CNN commentators Ana Navarro and Joe Kennedy got into it on Monday over whether the media is giving Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene (R- GA) too much attention and oxygen. Greene recently made an on-its-face ridiculous comparison between mask mandates and Nazi Germany. Greene doubled down, while a smattering of Republican colleagues have called her out. Navarro went on a tear against Greene and asked how House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy could “possibly stay silent” in the face of this nonsense. “If you stand with Israel, you have got to denounce — get up and find your backbone, among other parts — and denounce and condemn these horrific, unacceptable statements by this heap of steaming trash that has been elected to Congress from Georgia,” she said. Kennedy, a former U.S. congressman, agreed that Greene’s comments are “disgusting” and said she “demeans democracy,” but went on to say, “We also can reject them and not give her the oxygen that continues to feed this machine.” Navarro said she disagrees and argued, “I don’t think we have the option of not giving it oxygen and...
    When Howard Davies-Carr uploaded a 55-second video to YouTube back in May 2007, he believed it to be little more than 'mildly funny'. It featured footage of his two boys, Harry, three, and one-year-old Charlie, and Howard thought their interaction might tickle their godfather in the U.S. It certainly wasn't intended to be a permanent feature on the site. But when he went to delete the film a couple of months later, he found that it had thousands of views — and the number was increasing before his eyes. 'I did think,''Why are all these people watching it?'' I certainly didn't have that many friends,' he recalls now. It's a question Howard, a 52-year-old technology company manager, and his wife Shelley, 44, have mused on over the years. For the film Charlie Bit My Finger has become one of the most-viewed viral videos of all time, seen by more than 883 million people and counting. It also propelled the family into the global spotlight and gained them advertising and sponsorship deals which, over the years, reportedly netted them hundreds of...
    Loading the player... If you are betting on Tiffany Haddish replacing Ellen DeGeneres on her longtime-running talk show, don’t bet all your coins yet. During a recent appearance on Power 105.1’s The Breakfast Club, the comedian recently announced that she had not been officially offered the gig. DeGeneres is set to leave her show next season, and even though Haddish had filled in for the host before, she made it clear she has not received that formal call. “I haven’t commented on it because ain’t nobody that give those jobs talk to me about it,” said Haddish. “The reason I’ve even been popping up guest hosting Ellen is because she wanted some days off.” Read More: ‘Here Today’ helped Tiffany Haddish understand her grandmother’s battle with dementia DeGeneres recently announced her popular daytime talk show would come to an end after season 19 in 2022. It is currently in the middle of season 18. “I’m learning a new skill. That’s it,” added Haddish in regards to hosting. “Y’all just watching me learn in front of everybody.” View this post on Instagram A post shared by The Breakfast...
    (CNN)Isaac Rothbart's twins had always known their daddy doesn't like fireworks. But he'd never told his kids why. Then, while celebrating their fifth birthday at Disney World, the family wound up close to an unexpected pyrotechnics show. Rothbart "didn't react well." His wife noticed him shutting down and ushered the whole family indoors.That's when Rothbart and his wife decided it was time to have the conversation with the kids. Rothbart had recorded an HBO documentary specifically geared toward teaching children about the September 11 attacks. That would be their conversation starter.Pandemic deaths, insurrections, terrorist attacks and endless video loops of police brutality and hate crimes present parents with continual pressures about how and when to share troubling and traumatizing news with our children. Those pressures are further compounded when we or our loved ones are personally affected. Only by accident did Rothbart and I wind up discussing how to tell kids about the deadliest terrorist attack on US soil. At the time, Rothbart, chief financial officer of the New York City Police Foundation, was trying to help me locate a...
    When the COVID-19 pandemic broke out early last year, Asian Americans shared the nation’s concerns over the impact on their physical health. But they also carried a mental health burden, as they were blamed for COVID-19 and saw an escalation in hate crimes and hateful rhetoric linked to the pandemic. Asian Americans have been harassed, assaulted and killed. Even as the nation reopens, anti-Asian hate remains part of the new normal. The Atlanta spa shooting in March was a high-profile incident that shed light on another struggle with which Asian Americans have been invisibly grappling: gender-based violence. On May 19 at 6 p.m., Ada Tseng, assistant editor of the L.A. Times utility team, and reporter Agnes Constante will speak to mental health experts and community organizers about Asian American gender-based violence. The panelists: Anjali Alimchandani, PhD, MPP psychologist in private practice, advisory board member of the National Queer and Transgender Therapists of Color Network Lian Cheun, executive director of Khmer Girls in Action Manjusha Kulkarni, co-founder of Stop AAPI Hate and executive director of Asian Pacific Policy and...
    (CNN)While the drug dealers on the street enticing kids to take a hit haven't disappeared, my teenage clients tell me that social media is increasingly an almost invisible way that dealers are reaching young people. This phenomenon can lead to tragic consequences. Some kids are overdosing on these drugs, occasionally laced with potentially lethal substances. This was the case in the devastating death of relationship therapist and TV host Laura Berman's son, who allegedly bought fentanyl-laced Xanax on Snapchat.Snapchat spokeswoman Rachel Racusen said in an emailed statement to CNN that the company's deepest sympathies were with the family following the tragedy in February."We are committed to working together with law enforcement in this case and in all instances where Snapchat is used for illegal purposes. We have zero tolerance for using Snapchat to buy or sell illegal drugs," Racusen said. High schoolers who misuse prescription opioids are at higher risk for suicidal behaviors, study finds Using Snapchat for illegal purposes is against the company's community guidelines and "we enforce against these violations," she added. Read More"We are constantly improving our...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Recent police-involved shootings in the U.S. have prompted many parents to have a conversation with their kids about race, policing and witnessing traumatic events. CBS2 spoke with a psychologist who says the dialogue should always be ongoing. READ MORE: Valerie Cincinelli, Ex-NYPD Officer Accused In Murder-For-Hire Plot, Expected To Plead Guilty “It’s not just one talk, but a series of talks. And the talks are not just about strategies about how to behave and not being seen as suspicious, but most importantly, what I do for my own Black children, it’s about modeling behaviors for them,” said Dr. Jeffrey Gardere. READ MORE: Caught On Video: Sucker Punch Assault, Robbery In Queens Watch: Dr. Jeffrey Gardere On Talking To Children About Race, Policing, And Witnessing Trauma MORE NEWS: Man With Rifle Stopped At Times Square Subway Station You can watch the full interview with Gardere in the video above.
    While the national conversation about “misinformation” overwhelmingly links conservatives with the material — and censors or de-platforms them as a result — a recent study has shown that “very liberal” Americans are themselves deeply misinformed when it comes to the critical issue of racially-motivated brutality in policing.
    Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have sent sweet treats and a thoughtful letter to the incredible women behind a Grenfell community kitchen to mark International Women's Day. The Duke, 36, and Duchess of Sussex, 39, praised the Hubb Community Kitchen for their 'compassionate example' and said they 'frequently talk about how much we miss all of you'. The initiative, long-supported by the Sussexes, was set up to provide support and hot meals for bereaved families in west London following the Grenfell blaze, which killed 72 people on June 14, 2017.  Delicious-looking cupcakes decorated with fruit were sent to the women behind the kitchen via the Luminary Bakery, a small independent London bakery that Meghan has worked with in recent years as it aims to 'empower women'. The gesture comes after Meghan and Prince Harry's bombshell Oprah interview sent shock waves around the world yesterday as the couple laid bare the extent of their rift with the Royal Family. Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have sent sweet treats and a thoughtful letter (pictured) to the incredible women behind a Grenfell community kitchen to mark International Women's Day Delicious-looking...
    Unable to find love the conventional way over the last year, singletons have turned to online dating apps to meet someone during the pandemic.  But with an abundance of potential suitors available at the push of a button, it can be difficult for singletons to know how to stand out, and how to get that all important swipe right.  To mark International Women's Day, Four young Tinder users from across the UK have revealed what exactly they look for in a prospective partner, from a witty profile bio to photos showing off your passions. They also revealed what gives them the 'ick' in a potential date, including posting selfies, showing off how much they can lift or how good they are at sport and describing their match as 'not like other girls'.  Other pet peeves include making boring small talk 'passive aggressive' comments in their bio and just being rude to the women they're chatting with.  Momo, 21, London  Momo, 21, from London, swipes left if a boy is showing off about himself and hates it when they leave...
    AS a parent, nothing quite compares to the joy on your child's face after the Tooth Fairy has paid them a visit or when they discover a pile of presents from Father Christmas. That said, one mum has caused a stir online after she revealed she hasn't taught her children about the Easter Bunny, Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy as she doesn't think it's "healthy". 2The mum opened up about the unusual parenting decision other mums think is 'weird'Credit: Tik Tok In a viral TikTok, Nevada Shareef said: "Name something about the way you raise your kids that people think is weird, but you think has been really healthy for them. I'll go first..." The mum said she's never told her children about Santa or the Easter Bunny because she doesn't want to "build their hopes up, only to have them crushed later." She continued: "I was often criticised, saying that I'm not allowing my children to have an imagination, or I'm not allowing my children to be a child, but actually I'm allowing my children to have imaginations...
    Getty Images  Some people with Harm OCD are obsessively worrying they will hurt someone.  Others with the contamination sub-type are receiving conflicting messages about washing their hands. Experts also worry that people with OCD will struggle to re-assimilate back into society.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Amid the mental health crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, people with OCD are experiencing unique difficulties. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating mental health condition. Obsessions are the unwelcome thoughts that repeatedly appear in the mind, while compulsions are the repetitive activities done to reduce the anxiety caused by the obsession. According to the International OCD Foundation, between two to three million adults in the US currently have OCD and 500,000 children and teenagers. In 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) called OCD one of the top 10 most disabling illnesses by lost income and quality of life. When 19-year-old Iowa college student, Shira Folberg, was 16, her OCD led to her medically withdrawing from high school. She has had issues related to disordered eating, health-related anxiety,...
    This article has been medically reviewed byJeremy Novich, a licensed psychologist, practicing in Manhattan, New York.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. Be supportive and nonjudgmental when approaching someone about their alcohol use. Westend61/ Getty Images If someone you know is drinking too much alcohol regularly, they may have alcohol use disorder.  To help someone struggling with alcohol, use nonjudgemental language and avoid chastising them.  Resources like Alcoholics Anonymous and professional treatment programs can help someone stay sober.  Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. There is a right and wrong way to seek help and support for a loved one struggling with alcoholism.  People struggling with alcoholism often feel like they need alcohol all the time and that they cannot function normally without it. Helping them get treatment...
    This article was medically reviewed by Jason R. McKnight, MD, MS, a family medicine physician and clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. The benefits of sex go hand-in-hand with a healthy sex life. Flashpop/Getty Images Sex has mental health benefits like reducing stress, boosting mood, and increasing libido.  Sex also has physical health benefits like burning calories, boosting immunity, improving sleep, lowering blood pressure, and relieving pain.  To have a healthy sex life, it's important to communicate with your partner about how much sex is right for you and what makes you feel good.   Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. Having sex ushers in a rush of feel-good chemicals that can reduce stress, improve sleep, and more.  It doesn't matter how often you...
    While President Joe Biden 'has not spent a moment' thinking about Air Force One's color scheme, according to press secretary Jen Psaki, former President Donald Trump cared so much he sat down with National Geographic to talk about the project.  DailyMail.com got early access to the forthcoming NatGeo documentary 'The New Air Force One: Flying Fortress,' which shows Trump on board Air Force One speaking about the 'stronger' design he'd chosen for two new planes being built.  The 44-minute documentary also reveals that Trump wanted the presidential bedroom to have a 'more modern luxury look' that includes a queen bed, instead of two twin fold-outs, a larger TV and more seating.  President Donald Trump sat down for an interview with National Geographic in October 2019 to talk about the new Air Force One planes that he helped design  Trump looked at four different color schemes and preferred a red, white and blue design with blue engines. Trump told NatGeo that the redesign was 'stronger' and 'actually more beautiful' The National Geographic documentary, 'The New Air Force One:...
    SolStock | E+ | Getty Images When Tim Maurer's two teenagers burst into his home office last week, excitedly talking about how a bunch of kids had taken on Wall Street, the Charleston, South Carolina, certified financial planner knew it presented a great opportunity to teach his boys about investing. Lecturing doesn't usually work, Maurer said. Therefore, it's important to be flexible so you can take advantage when kids show an interest. "When kids come to you and they are clearly curious, that is the best time to give them the education you would hope to instill in a speech and a lecture," said Maurer, wealth advisor and director of personal finance for Buckingham Strategic Wealth and BAM Alliance. Retail buyers, largely fueled by the Reddit chat room WallStreetBets, piled into GameStop and AMC Entertainment to squeeze hedge funds who had shorted the stock. Short selling is a strategy in which investors borrow shares of a stock at a certain price in expectations that the market value will fall below that level when it's time to pay for the borrowed...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – All of us have seen scary things over the past week, our kids included. During this time, many parents have a hard time knowing what to say. So, how can we talk with our kids about the news? Good Question. “That’s going to depend on a number of things – who are they, how sensitive are they, what are they asking you and, very important, how old are they,” said Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, a professor of child psychology at the University of Minnesota and author of “When the World Feels Like a Scary Place.” She suggests making sure the parents’ emotions and stress levels are in check before they start conversation or answer difficult questions. She also points out that the average age for kids to have their first cell phone is 10 years old, so children often know more than we might think. For the 10-year-old, Gerwitz suggests saying something like “I know you haven’t said anything about it, but a lot of things have happened over the last week. I don’t know about you, but I...
    WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Police try to hold back protesters who gather storm the Capitol and halt a joint session of the 117th Congress on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Parents may struggle to talk to their kids about the riot at the US Capitol. Reassuring children about their safety while acknowledging the significance of the attack is important.  Providing accurate information in an age-appropriate way can help kids understand what happened.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. As news comes out about the violent mob that stormed the Capitol last week, many parents may struggle to find the words to explain the events to kids.  Talking to kids about the attempted coup is important, according to Bethany Robertson, co-director of ParentsTogether, a non-profit aimed at providing reliable news to families.  "As parents, it's our responsibility to help them process and understand what they may be seeing," said Robertson, who has elementary-aged children. "Our kids are living history." Here's how Robertson recommends talking to kids...
    TGIF, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Personal FinanceI pay my gardener $100 a month. Should I pay him less if he misses a week here and there because of rain? ‘There have been one or two times over the past couple years where he did not come, and for no apparent reason.’My wife found a half brother through Ancestry.com. Are we morally or ethically obligated to share her father’s estate? ‘The whole family seemed genuinely excited to finally find information on his biological father, after years of searching with no real leads.’ Why do I need to wear a mask if I’ve had COVID-19? Who is it protecting? Can I really be reinfected? ‘Like everyone else, I am hoping that the vaccine will help infection rates, and more people can get back to work.’Dr. Fauci on COVID-19 infections: ‘Things will get worse as we get into January’ Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned of a ‘dark time’ in mid-January after Christmas and Hanukkah.America’s richest person in 1831 left a legacy that still...
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