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    One of the most worrying elements about the new variant is its "constellation" of more than 30 new mutations, said Tulio de Oliveira of the Network for Genomic Surveillance in South Africa. "We can see that the variant is potentially spreading very fast," de Oliveira added. "We do expect to start seeing pressure in the healthcare system in the next few days and weeks." "[The] very high number of mutations is a concern for predicted immune evasion and transmissibility," he explained. What has been the international reaction? News of the new variant has caught the attention of scientists and public health officials around the world. The British government on Thursday announced that it would be banning flights from South Africa and five other southern African countries effective Friday. Other European countries, such as the Netherlands, have followed suit. Video surfaced on social media Friday appearing to show travelers from South Africa being instructed not to exit their plane after landing in Amsterdam. NOW - Passengers from South Africa are currently...
    People around the world gathered Wednesday in a mass effort to protest vaccine mandates sweeping the U.S., as well as other nations, kicking off a worldwide “walkout.” According to the Children’s Health Defense (CHD), a “Worldwide Walkout” event was planned for Nov. 3. The CHD said they planned to partner with other organizations and individuals to encourage a global “walk out” of work by calling in sick, taking a personal day, and pulling children out of schools to join in on the protests. FINAL UPDATE: TODAY’S THE DAY ???? Be safe out there + we’ll see you at the barricades! “No government in history has ever surrendered power in the absence of a demand.” — Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., CHD chairman and chief legal counselhttps://t.co/ZW06q1p7UJ pic.twitter.com/J0qcGH1yRM — Children’s Health Defense (@ChildrensHD) November 3, 2021 The live broadcast event in New York City was sponsored by other organizations NY Freedom Rally and Teachers For Choice. The event in the city featured notable speakers such as Michael Kane of Teacher’s For Choice, President Mary Holland Esq. from CHD, CHD NY President...
    A HUNTER'S Moon brightened the night sky last night and in the early hours of this morning. The Full Moon helped to create some stunning photographs and observers even spotted a reddish hue to it. 5The Hunter's Moon over Portland, DorsetCredit: Alamy 5Hunter's Moon over LondonCredit: Rick Findler / Story Picture Agency A full Moon at this time of year is traditionally called the Hunter's Moon. This is because it appears around the time that Native American tribes would gather meat for the winter ahead. Hunters and farmers would use the light of the Full Moon to harvest crops and track prey, stockpiling for the winter. Traditionally this also meant preserving the meat they caught to keep them going through the cold months. A Hunter's Moon, much like the Harvest Moon in September, can appear to have a red colour due to the short time between sunset and moon rise. Most read in ScienceExclusiveTALKING WITH DINOSAURS Dinosaurs loved to gather for a gossip 200m years ago, study findsNORSE HOLIDAY Viking settlers were living in America in 1021, ancient solar storm...
    THOUSANDS of Netflix users across the globe have reported the streaming service is down. The outage appears to have hit around 8pm in the UK with users in many other countries also reporting problems. 1Netflix users have been reporting the service has crashedCredit: Reuters Website Down Detector has received thousands of reports that Netflix isn't working. The independent outage tracker monitors social mentions around certain topics to detect when services go down across the world. At the time of writing over 6500 people were reporting problems, with 4700 of those coming from the UK. Around two thirds of them said it was related to streaming. Around quarter of complaints were about the website and a fifth relating to the app. Many users trying to access the platform has met with the error message 'tvq-st-145'. Some took to social media to vent their frustration with one woman tweeting: "Now is not the time for Netflix to be down." Another added: "Guess it's not just my Neflix that's down, FURIOUS!!!!!" Earlier this year, Netflix users reported problems in the United States. We...
    Antifullah Ahmadzai, an Afghan national, takes a selfie inside of a U.S. military cargo aircraft before an evacuation flight from Kabul.Courtesy: Antifullah Ahmadzai WASHINGTON – One month ago, Atifullah Ahmadzai boarded a flight from Connecticut to Kabul, eager to hold his wife and five young children again. The purpose of this trip was nearly a decade in the making as Ahmadzai, a former interpreter for the U.S. military, was carrying the final documents needed for his family to complete a coveted special immigrant visa. While in Kabul, Ahmadzai planned on saying goodbye to friends and extended family members before bringing his wife and children to America, where he had spent the last two years preparing for their new life. Ten days into his plans, after the rest of Afghanistan had already fallen during the U.S. military's withdrawal, the Taliban seized the presidential palace in Kabul. The swift collapse of the Afghan national government forced Ahmadzai and thousands of others to flood the gates of Hamid Karzai International Airport, where Western forces were conducting evacuation flights out of the country. The...
    It is increasingly clear that much resistance to vaccination in the United States is driven by partisanship. Fox News has spent months comparing vaccination efforts to apartheid and forced sterilization. Conservative politicians have been vaccinated in private, if at all. GOP voters have declared that their opposition to vaccination is driven by opposition to liberals. Meanwhile, across the Atlantic, hundreds of thousands have participated in anti-vaccination protests throughout Europe. Many far-right politicians in Europe have aligned themselves with these movements. In France, the far-right leader Marine Le Pen has called mandatory vaccination for health workers an "indecent brutality," while her Italian counterpart, Giorgia Meloni, has described vaccination passports as "totalitarian." This swell of international activity has left some journalists wondering, why is anti-vaccination emerging as a distinctly right-wing phenomenon across the globe? The answer is multiply determined, as is typical of socio-political phenomena. There is, nonetheless, a clear explanatory variable for much of this trend: anti-vaccination sentiment is perfectly aligned with extant populist ideology, particularly within the far-right. The meaning of "populism" is contested. It's often used imprecisely...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — The delta variant is soaring around the U.S. and the world. Here at home, travel restrictions are returning including in Chicago where 14 states are now on the city’s travel advisory list. READ MORE: Olympic Champ Simone Biles Withdraws From Thursdays All-Around Competition Expect changes internationally, too. CBS 2 Morning Insider Lauren Victory takes us inside the shifting COVID-19 tides overseas. Peter Greenberg’s video of Santorini, Greece, is enough to make you drool. The European destination is always beautiful, but almost never empty like it is in his footage from Tuesday. “It would be wall-to-wall people on a day like today, and today it wasn’t,” said Greenberg, travel editor for CBS News. From St. Marteen in the Caribbean to Turkey in the Middle East, Greenberg is tasked with reporting on COVID-19 recovery in countries around the world. This week, he’s on board the first sailing of a Grecian cruise: Silver Moon. “Once you’re here, you’re free to go anywhere. Keep in mind that Greece is still in a somewhat of a lockdown situation, but nothing that’s abusive. You...
    (CNN)Yakuts in Russian Siberia is known as the world's coldest city. In a place where even an exposed nose during the winter months can cause biting pain, people are accustomed to taking precautions against freezing temperatures, including spending extra time in the morning to dress in many layers.But now the city is blanketed in haze as nearby wildfires tear through forests that have been parched by weeks of heatwaves. The fires are so big, and the winds strong, smoke is traveling as far away as Alaska. In the US, the Bootleg wildfire in Oregon has grown into a monstrous complex with its own weather, sending the dense smoke some 3,000 miles across one end of the continent to the other. New York City on Wednesday woke up to an intense red sunrise, the smell of wildfires and a thick brown haze.Firefighters in both countries, as well as British Columbia in Canada, are fighting a near-impossible battle to smother the infernos with water bombs and hoses, and preventing their spread by digging firebreaks. An aerial view shows a wildfire in Yakutia,...
    By uprooting carbon trapped in the soil, wild pigs release some 4.9 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide across the globe each year, a study has warned. This is the equivalent of the carbon emissions of 1.1 million cars, said experts from the Universities of Queensland, Australia, and Canterbury, New Zealand. In their study, the researchers combined predictive population models with advanced mapping techniques to determine the impact of wild pigs on the climate. The team simulated 10,000 maps of potential wild pig densities across five continents based on existing data on the animals' numbers and distribution. They then modelled how much soil would be disturbed by these pigs based on previous studies into foraging damage across various climatic conditions. The findings, the team said, highlight the impact that invasive species like wild pigs can have and the need for better controls to manage the their populations. Wild pig populations are typically managed using approaches like hunting, baiting, deploying traps and installing barriers to stop their spread into new areas. By uprooting carbon trapped in the soil, wild pigs release some...
    A SOFTWARE bug ground Snapchat to a halt on Monday, leaving thousands of miffed users unable to access the photo-sharing app. The glitch on the iOS version of Snapchat caused the app to crash almost immediately after launch. Read all the latest Phones & Gadgets news Keep up-to-date on Apple stories Get the latest on Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram 2The Snapchat app ran into issues on iOS on MondayCredit: Getty - Contributor The issue has now been fixed following the release of a software update, The Verge reports. It doesn't appear that the bug affected the Android version of the app. Prior to the update, users attempting to launch Snapchat on their iPhone were shown an error message before the app crashed. After updating to the latest version, 11.34.1.35, the error message no longer shows and users can send snaps as normal. Oh snap pic.twitter.com/yC2BKjhzmw— Mitchell (@strawberrywell) June 28, 2021 Issues with the app began around 2pm BST (9am ET) following the release of an update on iOS. Users took to Twitter to vent their frustrations at the...
    Brief internet outages on Thursday hit multiple entities across the globe, including banks, airlines, and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. AT&T, Cox, Comcast, Mediacom, Southwest Airlines, ADP, and Akamai, a content delivery service that represents several of the largest banks across the world, among others, reported stoppages at similar time frames, according to Downdetector.com. At 6:42 a.m., Akamai addressed the disruption in service. "Akamai is aware of the issue and actively working to restore services as soon as possible," the company wrote in a tweet. MASSIVE INTERNET OUTAGE LEAVES REDDIT, CNN, AND NEW YORK TIMES AMONG WEBSITES OFFLINE The Hong Kong Stock Exchange was one of the most high-profile victims on Thursday morning as it alerted its clients of a stoppage in service. Access quickly resumed. Australia Post, Australia's mail service, also reported an outage. "An external outage is currently impacting a number of our services," it wrote. "We are investigating and will keep you updated as more information is available. While most of our services are coming back online, we are continuing to monitor...
    A "couple of beers" between U.S. and Australian law enforcement officials morphed into a sprawling, sophisticated international criminal underworld takedown that thwarted dozens of murders, netted a mountain of drugs and led to more than 800 arrests, authorities said. The operation dubbed "Trojan Shield" in the U.S. duped criminals across the globe into buying cellphones that had pre-loaded FBI software on them — and exposed Asian Triad gangs, Middle Eastern organized crime outfits, Latin American drug cartels and even biker crews to police investigators. It has netted some 8 tons of cocaine, 2 tons of amphetamine, 55 luxury cars, 250 guns and more than 20 tons of marijuana and hash after raids in countries across the globe, Jean-Philippe Lecouffe, deputy director of operations at Europol, said at a press conference in the Netherlands on Tuesday. FBI OFFERS INFORMATION REWARD AFTER WALMART FIRES IN ALABAMA, MISSISSIPPI A total of 250 guns were seized during the sting operation. (NSW Police Force) The dragnet, which was hatched by U.S. and Australian law enforcement authorities, employed at least 9,000 law enforcement officials across the globe...
    More On: fbi FBI encrypted phone app leads to hundreds of global underworld arrests Romanian tycoon hired Hunter Biden, ex-FBI chief to help him avoid jail: emails NYPD botched grope probe of FBI agent, accuser says ‘Stop the plane!’ Flight diverted after unruly passenger tries to breach cockpit A “couple of beers” between US and Australian law enforcement officials morphed into a sprawling, sophisticated international criminal underworld takedown that thwarted dozens of murders, netted a mountain of drugs and led to more than 800 arrests, authorities said. The operation dubbed “Trojan Shield” in the US duped criminals across the globe into buying cellphones that had pre-loaded FBI software on them — and exposed Asian Triad gangs, Middle Eastern organized crime outfits, Latin American drug cartels and even biker crews to police investigators. It has netted some eight tons of cocaine, two tons of amphetamine, 55 luxury cars, 250 guns and more than 20 tons of marijuana and hash after raids in countries across the globe, Jean-Philippe Lecouffe, Deputy Director of Operations at Europol, said at a press...
    Panama is reportedly struggling to handle a significant surge of migrants from outside the Americas entering their country illegally en route to the U.S. amid the Biden administration’s lenient border policy that has driven a record number of people to try to enter the United States. It appears Biden’s welcoming message and partially open-border policy, overseen by U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, has been heard across the globe. Non-Latin American migrants sneaking into Panama have been the canary in the coal mine for an impending wave of migrants from Africa, the Middle East, and other places outside the Western Hemisphere heading to the U.S. Citing Panama’s Foreign Minister (FM) Erika Mouynes, Bloomberg reported Thursday that Panama is having trouble addressing “a five-fold increase in migrants who trek for days through its dense southern jungle in the hope of reaching the U.S.. Thousands of migrants traveling from outside the Americas, including Africa and Asia, are beginning to overwhelm Panama’s shelters, the FM revealed, describing a situation similar to that at the U.S. southern border. Mouynes told Bloomberg:...
    'These are deaths related to heat that actually can be prevented. It is something we directly cause,' epidemiologist Ana Vicedo-Cabrera said. More than one-third of the world's heat deaths each year are due directly to global warming, according to the latest study to calculate the human cost of climate change. But scientists say that's only a sliver of climate's overall toll — even more people die from other extreme weather amplified by global warming such as storms, flooding and drought — and the heat death numbers will grow exponentially with rising temperatures. Dozens of researchers who looked at heat deaths in 732 cities around the globe from 1991 to 2018 calculated that 37% were caused by higher temperatures from human-caused warming, according to a study Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change. That amounts to about 9,700 people a year from just those cities, but it is much more worldwide, the study's lead author said. "These are deaths related to heat that actually can be prevented. It is something we...
                      by Mary Margaret Olohan  An “avalanche” of “expanding and accelerating” demographic forces is driving global birth rates down at alarming rates, demographers warned The New York Times. “A paradigm shift is necessary,” German demographer Frank Swiaczny, former United Nations chief of population trends and analysis, told the Times. “Countries need to learn to live with and adapt to decline.” The publication described ghost cities in northeastern China, South Korean universities scrambling for students, hundreds of thousands of demolished properties in Germany, and shut down maternity wards in Italy, and warned that countries like Hungary, China, Sweden and Japan are already pushing to balance the combination of “swelling” older populations with the needs of young people. Professor Brad Wilcox, director of the National Marriage Project, called the report “jaw-dropping.” “From South Korea to South America, from Italy to the U.S., we’re witnessing an epochal fall in fertility,” the professor warned. A host of factors, which the Times described as “an avalanche” of “demographic forces,” appear to be accelerating toward more deaths than births almost...
    An “avalanche” of “expanding and accelerating” demographic forces is driving birth rates down, demographers warned The New York Times.  The publication described ghost cities in northeastern China, South Korean universities scrambling for students, hundreds of thousands of razed properties in Germany and shut down maternity wards in Italy. Demographers predicted to the Times that by the second half of the century — or earlier — the global population will enter a sustained decline. “A paradigm shift is necessary,” German demographer Frank Swiacznyn told the Times.  “Countries need to learn to live with and adapt to decline.” An “avalanche” of “expanding and accelerating” demographic forces is driving global birth rates down at alarming rates, demographers warned The New York Times. “A paradigm shift is necessary,” German demographer Frank Swiaczny, former United Nations chief of population trends and analysis, told the Times. “Countries need to learn to live with and adapt to decline.” The publication described ghost cities in northeastern China, South Korean universities scrambling for students, hundreds of thousands of demolished properties in Germany, and shut down maternity wards...
    The Pentagon is wielding United States' power through a shadowy army of 60,000 soldiers, civilians and contractors working under assumed identities and carrying out top secret domestic and overseas missions, according to a Newsweek investigation.   The force includes NSA agents, cyber security experts and special forces operating behind hostile enemy lines in places like North Korea and Iran, and is serviced by around 130 private companies, and supported by dozens of secretive Government agencies at an annual cost of $900million, according to the report. The 'army' operate in an amorphous new area of combat known as 'signature reduction', that exists in the 'twilight between covert and undercover', according to one senior intelligence officer.  A Department of Defense spokesperson told Newsweek that 'signature reduction' 'is not an official term' and that it is used to describe 'measures taken to protect operations.' The Defense Intelligence Agency says signature reduction could be described as  'operational security (OPSEC) measures for a variety of activities and operations'. The true size of the force of undercover operatives, which is completely unregulated and has never been the subject of...
    Kyle, left, and his boyfriend, George went two months without seeing each other at the start of the pandemic. Kyle Glick The COVID-19 pandemic changed the dating landscape and took a toll on many relationships. Four people shared their stories about finding love, or questioning it, during the pandemic. From virtual dating across the globe to struggling through lockdowns with family, here are their stories. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Like many people, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit last spring, Megan, 39, was bummed she had to cancel her upcoming vacation plans abroad. But more than a year later, she feels a bit differently about the situation. "I met my husband because of the pandemic," Megan told Insider. Dating and relationships, like most aspects of American life, were upended by the coronavirus. Social distancing guidelines and lockdowns disrupted classic dinner dates and bar meetups. Some people found themselves moving in with partners earlier than they normally would, while others found their marriage under tremendous strain. Insider spoke with four people whose dating life or relationships were...
    Senators ask Biden to ease rules that are holding up vaccinations across the globe
    INTERNATIONAL Women's Day celebrates the achievements of women around the globe. It has been marked on March 8 every year for more than a century and each year has a different theme. 2An activist at Schouwburg Square in Rotterdam, NetherlandsCredit: Rex Features What is the theme of International Women's Day 2021? The theme of IWD 2021 is #ChooseToChallenge. It urges us to call out gender bias and inequality to create a more inclusive world. How can I get involved? There are plenty of ways to get involved with IWD 2021, despite the pandemic. One easy way is to take part in the Choose To Challenge pose on social media. IWD organisers are asking people to pose with their hand high to show their commitment to challenging inequality, calling out bias, questioning stereotypes, and helping to forge an inclusive world. Participants can submit their photos online and some will be featured on the IWD website and social media feeds. Another way to get involved could be to fundraise for a female-focused charity. IWD raised a six-figure...
    Despite the global pandemic putting a halt on many gatherings, people from around the world have already come together to show support for International Women's Day ahead of the annual observance on 8 March. This year's theme 'Choose to Challenge' has racked up thousands of posts across social media, with many posting selfies on Instagram with one hand in the air alongside a detailed caption explaining the bias and inequalities they're championing. On Twitter, the hashtag has become a way of spreading awareness of protests taking place in over 40 countries - with people spotted in China and Russia arranging flowers, and women in Israel laying in mock coffins to represent those who've been killed as a result of domestic violence. Meanwhile the streets of Turkey, Netherlands and India has been filled with people protesting for equality and seeking justice for individual women. Elsewhere in the UK and Canada, virtual panels have been organised to celebrate women who have campaigned for positive change.  Social media has been flooded with posts about International Women's Day ahead of the annual observance on 8 March....
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The first months of the coronavirus pandemic were full of confusion and change. How was virus spread? Who was most at risk? What can we do to control it? READ MORE: Cuomo: First Positive Coronavirus Case In NYC Confirmed While we have many answers now, new variants are raising important questions about the future, CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reported Monday. It was New Year’s Eve 2019 when word began to trickle out of a cluster of viral pneumonias of unknown origin in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in central China. It would soon be determined that the cause was a novel, meaning previously unknown, coronavirus. What was initially thought to be a flu-like disease that had made an unusual jump from animals to humans, likely in Wuhan’s live animal market, quickly spread in the community. The virus had mutated to allow for person-to-person transmission. The pandemic had begun. COVID VACCINE New York State book online here or call 1-833-NYS-4-VAX New York City book online here or call 877-VAX-4NYC Track NYC Vaccinations By Zip Code Nassau County more info...
    The Lunar New Year is a time to celebrate culture and family. Hollis Johnson/Insider New Year's traditions look different depending on where you are and what religion and customs you follow. We looked at five New Year's celebrations around the world — from the Chinese Lunar New Year to the Hindu lunar festival Diwali — to see how people around the world reflect on the past and prepare for the future. Read more stories like this on Insider. The Lunar New Year is a time for families to come together and celebrate with food, snacks, parades, and good company; it is a time to slow down and catch up with loved ones. It is celebrated in Chinese communities across the world as well as many other Asian ethnicities that follow the lunar calendar. 2021 marks the beginning of the Year of the Ox, which symbolizes strength, movement, and hard work. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the world and impact the way families celebrate, these values are more important than ever. New Year's looks different depending...
    Coronavirus lockdowns have stripped the world of democratic freedoms, with 2020 returning the worst scores in the 15-year history of an annual democracy index. The United Kingdom slipped two places, while France and Portugal joined the US in the 'flawed democracies' categories compiled in the Economist's Democracy Index. Norway, Iceland and Sweden were unchanged at the top, the Central African Republic, the Congo and North Korea, stayed bottom. But overall the democracies were dented throughout the world as draconian measures were introduced to control the pandemic.  Police officers patrol near the Eiffel Tower during a government enforced quarantine on March 17. The French and Portuguese democracies were the most dented in Europe because of their extreme lockdowns, the report said While repressions were most extreme in authoritarian states, the report said 'the removal of individual liberties in development democracies was the most remarkable feature of 2020.' The index's top 30 democracies Norway Iceland Sweden New Zealand Canada Finland Denmark Ireland Australia Netherlands Taiwan Switzerland Luxembourg Germany Uruguay United Kingdom Chile Austria Costa Rica Mauritius Japan Spain South Korea France...
    For over a decade, CouldYou? has driven innovation in the non-profit sector offering transformational programming providing menstrual health education and the CouldYou? menstrual cup in The United States, Ghana, Uganda, South Africa, Cape Verde, Mozambique, and Liberia. San Diego, United States, Jan. 31, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — San Diego, CA-The CouldYou? Women and Girls’ Health Initiative promotes empowerment of women and girls through the distribution of the CouldYou? menstrual cup, menstrual health education, monitoring and evaluation. The data driven program is rooted in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals 1, 3-6, 8, 12 and 17, and to date has helped change the lives of more than 19,500 girls and women. The CouldYou? program which was developed and launched by grass roots strategist Christine Garde Denning, began in sub-Saharan Africa with a focus on Ghana and Mozambique to defeat a scourge of young women and school age girls around the world experiencing “Period Poverty” . “Period Poverty” which occurs at the onset of puberty forces millions of young women globally into a well documented downward spiral where girls end up not...
    MSNBC host Joe Scarborough blamed Facebook for spreading lies about everything from the pandemic to politics, calling the social media giant “a malignant force across the globe.” Scarborough devoted an entire segment of Friday’s “Morning Joe” to a rant calling for regulation that would break up Facebook’s monopoly and stop the dissemination of the type of disinformation that he said led to the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. (RELATED: ‘Beyond Grotesque’: Joe Scarborough Flames Fox News Over Newt Gingrich Claim That Democrats Want To ‘Exterminate’ Republicans) WATCH: Scarborough began by saying that Facebook’s algorithms were designed to cater to extreme views and to push people toward radicalization rather than away from it. Calling for Facebook to be regulated and broken apart, Scarborough continued, “Facebook is a monopoly. It controls over 50 percent of news gathering, and they are reckless as hell! There is no accountability! And they are destroying not just American democracy, they’re destroying democracy across the globe. They are actually working with tyrannical governments to help chase out freedom fighters in certain countries. They are a...
    Facebook has long been a favorite target on Morning Joe. And now, Joe Scarborough is amping up the pressure on the social media giant in a big way. In an utterly brutal eight-minute tirade Friday on Morning Joe, the MSNBC host laced into Facebook over rapidly spreading conspiracies on their platform — accusing the company of having “set up algorithms that radicalize people.” Scarborough further called for the company to be split up. “No more socialism for [Mark] Zuckerberg,” Scarborough said. “No more protection for Facebook. They need to be thrown into the free market system. They’re a monopoly, they need to be broken up.” He added, “Facebook is a monopoly. It controls over 50 percent of news gathering, and they are reckless as hell! There is no accountability! And they are destroying not just American democracy, they’re destroying democracy across the globe. They are actually working with tyrannical governments to help chase out freedom fighters in certain countries. They are a malignant force across the globe!” Scarborough raised the temperature even higher by assigning the company significant blame for...
    Oregon health workers administer Covid-19vaccines in snowstorm to stranded motorists Federal Appeals Court Denies Qualified Immunity to Officer Who Tear Gassed Reporters Covering 2014 Ferguson Unrest Best & Worst Refinance Mortgage Companies of 2021 Ad Microsoft Seniors Are Getting These Unsold 2020 SUVs For Dirt Cheap Ad Microsoft A slam dunk if you need a balance transfer Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/26 SLIDES © Shutterstock.com As soon as news broke that life would be put on pause to battle the novel coronavirus, nearly every industry was affected. The automotive market in particular — both on the production and purchasing sides — had to alter its mode of operations almost entirely. Drive: 30 Cars With the Highest Resale Value Now, with plants...
    The Guardian ‘I want to go home’: Filipina domestic workers face exploitative conditions Many of the Filipina women we interviewed across Asia, Europe and the Middle East lost jobs or had salaries cut since the pandemic – others were subjected to physical abuse ‘They’ve got no support whatsoever.’ Illustration: Susie Ang/The Guardian This story is published in partnership between the Guardian and the Fuller Project. Every morning, Rowena wakes early on the pile of blankets where she sleeps, curled up against a desk in the corner of the office she used to clean. It’s not yet 7am, but if her manager catches her alone in her pyjamas, he’ll try to grope and stroke her, as he’s tried to do several times a week for the past six months. Rowena, who is 54 and asked to be identified only by her first name, left the Philippines for Bahrain in April 2019. After she had been in the Gulf country for a year, her boss told her that due to the pandemic, he could no longer pay her monthly salary of 120...
    Google workers across the world are coming together to form a global union alliance. The newly formed coalition, called Alpha Global, is comprised of 13 different unions representing workers in 10 countries, including the United States, United Kingdom, and Switzerland. The announcement comes weeks after workers in the US and Canada launched the Alphabet Workers Union (AWU), a minority union affiliated with the Communications Workers of America. AWU grew from 230 members to more than 700 within a week after it launched. Alpha Global is affiliated with the UNI Global Union, a federation of labor unions representing 20 million people worldwide, including workers at Amazon. “We know that organizing for justice at a global company like Alphabet does not stop at national boundaries,” said Parul Koul, executive chair of the Alphabet Workers Union and a Google software engineer, in a statement. “That is why it is so important to unite with workers in other countries. In a world where inequality is tearing apart, our societies and corporations are hoarding more influence than ever, reclaiming our power through...
    An Italian photographer has spent two years travelling the world capturing pictures of people with albinism, in a bid to highlight the discrimination that still exists against them in many parts of the world. Silvia Alessi, 44, from Bergamo, took photos of people with the disorder, which is caused by pigment being completely or partially missing from skin and hair, for her latest art project after being inspired by an Instagram post.  Among her subjects are three elderly siblings from India, who have never been photographed together before, and a Kurdish boy with white hair and very pale skin who lives in a house decorated completely in white.  Scroll down for video  A young Kurdish boy named Arya, who is seen posing amongst the pristine white décor of his family's home, features in Skin Project by Italian photographer Silvia Alessi, who spent two years taking pictures of people with albinism Stigma: the photographer says there's still prejudice around the world against people who are born with the condition, which is caused by pigment being completely or partially missing from...
    A good perfume is a staple in any woman's life and whilst different people may prefer varying scents, it seems one fragrance has come out on top.  Research from online beauty retailer Lookfantastic analysed Google searches across the globe to reveal the most popular women's and men's perfumes worldwide.   Caroline Herrera's Good Girl placed first for women, closely followed by Black Orchid by Tom Ford and Daisy by Marc Jacobs, while the top spot for men's fragrances went to 1 Million by Paco Rabanne.  Good Girl was the number one most-searched for women’s fragrance in 42 countries - including Paraguay, Brazil, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland and Vietnam. Caroline Herrera's Good Girl (pictured) was the number one most searched for women’s fragrance in 42 countries and the most popular around the world This was closely followed by Black Orchid by Tom Ford and Daisy by Marc Jacobs (right) - which was the UK's top fragrance for women  The powerful perfume was released in 2016 but has since become a favourite amongst shoppers, with top notes of Almond, heart notes of Jasmine...
    The average temperature of towns and cities around the world could be up to 8.1f (4.5C) warmer than today by the end of the century, researchers claim.  A team from Illinois University applied 26 different complex climate models to urban areas in a first of its kind study, to better understand the impact of climate change. The world is facing 'environmental armageddon' if carbon emissions remain high, warn the US team, who say devastating wether events including extreme droughts and catastrophic floods are inevitable unless action is taken. Britain would regularly sizzle in temperatures of over 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C) if the predictions made by the team from Illinois prove to be correct.   The world is facing 'environmental armageddon' if carbon emissions remain high, warn the US team, who say devastating wether events including extreme droughts and catastrophic floods are inevitable unless action is taken Corresponding author Dr Lei Zhao, of Illinois University, said over half the world's population lives in an urban environment such as a town or a city.  'Cities also tend to warm more than rural...
    By MELINDA DESLATTE, Associated Press BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana sent tens of millions of dollars to companies around the country and as far away as China for masks, gloves and ventilators in the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, with $87 million steered toward face coverings alone. The state, competing against more populous ones that have greater purchasing power, scrambled to equip hospitals, nursing homes, first responders, chemical plants and others with protective gear and medical devices as its first coronavirus outbreak began in the New Orleans area and then crept across the state. “We zero out the warehouse every day,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said in late March, describing a crushing need for inventory. “To say that demand is outpacing supply would be a gross understatement.” Amid the rush for supplies, Louisiana found itself paying well above states' average on certain items, an Associated Press review of data across states shows. One company that consistently sold Louisiana items at higher prices than other vendors, Garner Environmental Services, has ties to former Louisiana State Police superintendent Mike Edmonson....
    Microsoft has revealed that is 'working to notify' 40 of its customers specifically targeted in global hacking campaign launched from Russia. The software titan confirmed that the breach - the biggest in US history intelligence history - was not limited to Washington but spread across seven countries. The United Kingdom, Israel, Canada and the United Arab Emirates were also in the cross hairs and the list 'will keep growing.'    The targets were not limited to government agencies - predominantly defence organisations - but included IT firms, NGOs and think-tanks. Microsoft President Brad Smith said: 'This is not ''espionage as usual," even in the digital age. Instead, it represents an act of recklessness that created a serious technological vulnerability for the United States and the world.'  Microsoft said this map illustrates data sent back from its Defender Anti-Virus software and identifies customers who installed versions of SolarWinds' Orion software containing the attackers' malware which breached US government at the highest level Microsoft was breached in the massive suspected Russian campaign that has hit multiple U.S. government agencies Microsoft President...
    Diego Maradona was remembered by teams and players across the globe, including Lionel Messi, in his native Argentina and at Italian club Napoli. Less than a week after his death at age 60, teams and players from across the globe paid tribute to the memory and legacy of soccer superstar Diego Maradona. The famous No. 10, who helped Argentina win the 1986 World Cup, was remembered in his homeland and in Naples and throughout Italy’s Serie A, where he played the best club soccer of his career. Diego Maradona tributes in MLS. @NERevolution’s Gustavo Bou after scoring (via @ESPNFC) pic.twitter.com/DmHDSPPz1X — Luis Miguel Echegaray (@lmechegaray) November 29, 2020 Maradona may be gone, but this weekend’s displays are proof he won’t be forgotten. Next: There will never be another player like Maradona
    A black market for negative COVID-19 tests has popped up across the globe as more countries require travelers to prove their negative status before entering, a report said Wednesday. In France, seven people were arrested last week for allegedly hawking doctored coronavirus tests at Charles de Gaulle International Airport, The Associated Press reported. The suspects, who were not identified, were charging up to $360 for the fake tests. Authorities tracked the ring down after finding a man bound for Ethiopia with a fake test, according to the report. The alleged scammers face up to five years in prison if convicted. In South America, Brazilian officials arrested four tourists who gave fake tests after they flew into an island chain off the coast of the country that requires travelers to show negative test results. In England, a man told a local newspaper that he was able to travel to Pakistan by using a friend’s negative COVID-19 test and changing his name. “You can simply get their negative test and change the name and birthdate to your own. You also put...
    A black market for negative COVID-19 tests has popped up across the globe as more countries require travelers to prove their negative status before entering, a report said Wednesday. In France, seven people were arrested last week for allegedly hawking doctored coronavirus tests at Charles de Gaulle International Airport, The Associated Press reported. The suspects, who were not identified, were charging up to $360 for the fake tests. Authorities tracked the ring down after finding a man bound for Ethiopia with a fake test, according to the report. The alleged scammers face up to five years in prison if convicted. In South America, Brazilian officials arrested four tourists who gave fake tests after they flew into an island chain off the coast of the country that requires travelers to show negative test results. In England, a man told a local newspaper that he was able to travel to Pakistan by using a friend’s negative COVID-19 test and changing his name. “You can simply get their negative test and change the name and birthdate to your own. You also put a...
    Neanderthals and Homo sapiens were closely related, sister species who evolved from the same ancestor and co-existed for millennia. But scientists have tussled with trying to explain why Neanderthals went extinct around 40,000 years and humans lived on.  Several theories have been put forward to explain how this happened, including competition for the same resources, such as food and shelter; Neanderthals being unable to adjust to rapid climate change; and direct confrontation.  Now it is believed a combination of all of these things contributed to the Neanderthal extinction. But the latest data reveals the two hominin species were fighting grisly guerrilla-style battles for 100,000 years. Dr Nicholas R. Longrich, a senior lecturer in evolutionary biology and palaeontology at the University of Bath explains more in an article for The Conversation.   Scroll down for video  This graph, created by study author Dr Longrich, shows the global battles which waged for millennia between Neanderthals and humans, both archaic (blue) and modern (red)  Far from peaceful, Neanderthals were likely skilled fighters and dangerous warriors, rivalled only by modern humans Around 600,000 years...
    It was feared by many to be the perfect winter storm, a nightmare situation that would push our health service over the edge: the 'twin-demic' of flu, which kills about 10,000 Britons every year, and a second deadly wave of Covid-19. Such was the concern that the Government rolled out the biggest flu vaccination programme in British history. Thirty million people – 20 per cent more than normal, and now including all over-50s – are eligible for this year's jab.  Take up of the vaccine is already the highest it has ever been in the over-65s and young children, according to the latest reports. There's just one curious problem: flu, it seems, has all but vanished. It was feared by many to be the perfect winter storm, a nightmare situation that would push our health service over the edge: the 'twin-demic' of flu, which kills about 10,000 Britons every year, and a second deadly wave of Covid-19. Pictured: Stock image The disappearing act began as Covid-19 rolled in towards the end of our flu season in March. And just...
    RUSSIANS have allegedly used a 'secret microwave weapon' to target American spies and officials across the globe and on US soil. Doctors and specialists now believe foreign radiation weaponry is responsible for a mysterious illness that has plagued CIA agents in recent years. 3An investigation by the CIA has found US officials have been targeted by a 'sonic attack'Credit: Reuters 3Former CIA official Mark Polymeropoulous claims he was struck down by a mystery illness in Moscow A team of investigators at the CIA's headquarters in Langley now believe the victims affected by the mysterious illness were targeted by a device that could be beamed through walls and windows and could be affective from thousands of feet away. The victims reported ringing in their ears, dizziness, hysteria, psychosis and vertigo - something doctors branded as Havana syndrome - which was first suffered by American diplomats serving in Cuba in 2018. Doctors and patients began referring to it as “immaculate concussion.” In July 2018, US officials said they were still investigating the health problems at the US embassy in Cuba...
    Members of the medical personnel move a patient suffering from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the CHR Centre Hospitalier Regional de la Citadelle hospital, in Liege, Belgium October 20, 2020.Yves Herman | Reuters The coronavirus pandemic is accelerating across the globe as U.S. cases climb and at least 10 other countries, half in Europe, report record highs in average daily new cases. Argentina, Canada, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Russia, Spain, Ukraine and the United Kingdom all hit record highs in average daily new Covid-19 cases on Monday, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University. Figures are based on a weekly average to smooth out fluctuations in daily reporting. Iran, Russia and Ukraine each hit record highs for deaths, Hopkins data shows. When adjusting for population, the number of new infections in Europe has now overtaken that in the United States, with Europe reporting 231 new Covid-19 cases per 1 million people, based on a seven-day average, compared with 177 new Covid-19 cases per 1 million people in the U.S. Overall, Europe, which includes 27 European Union...
    If you are experiencing issues with Twitter, you are not alone. The social media platform is down for more than 33,000 users, mostly in the US and some in the UK.  Down Decetor, a site that moinotrs websites and online services, shows that outage began around 5pm ET and is plaguing the website and both iOS and Android apps. Some users opened the site to see notifications, mentions, and News Feed have all disappeared from the platform.  Twitter is down for more than 33,000 users, mostly in the US and some in the UK. The outage appear around 5pm ET and seems to be affecting more users in the US
    Out of crisis, creativity. Director of vocal pedagogy at the University of Colorado Boulder John Seesholtz and Houston-based musicologist Matthew J. Jones will present Music and HIV/AIDS — A Look at Then and Now, an interdisciplinary discussion via Zoom at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, October 12. During the free event, they'll look at the intersection of music and the HIV/AIDS crisis. "I think that it is very important that we have this discussion about the AIDS epidemic as we face our current COVID pandemic," Seesholtz says. "There are several parallels in the USA, as many in our sphere have become enraged about the idea of wearing masks, as well as a stigma in the religious community as lines have been blurred between politics and religion. The fear and anxiety of those facing HIV and AIDS in the 1980s and early ’90s are not widespread among many communities across the globe. I believe history allows us to learn and to find empathy in loss and struggle."Related Stories Glitter Bomb: Sasha Geffen's Queer Take on Pop Music and Gender Wheelchair Sports Camp's New Song Shoots Back...
    Coronavirus has claimed the lives of one million people worldwide since the outbreak emerged in China late last year. The virus has been recorded in 210 countries and infected at least 32 million people across the globe, according to a tally from official sources compiled by AFP.   Europe is now battling a second surge of the virus as the continent enters its winter months.   The United States, India and Brazil have recorded the most cases, with more than 15 million between them. Above, people wear protective masks in Mumbai Coronavirus has claimed the lives of one million people worldwide since the outbreak emerged in China late last year The figure comes a day after the World Health Organisation (WHO) warned that then global coronavirus death toll could hit two million before an effective vaccine is widely used.  Six months after coronavirus was first detected at a Wuhan wet market in December 2016, the global death toll had claimed at least 500,000 lives. In half that time, the known death toll is now believed to have doubled.   The true number...
    Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on Friday, September 18 this year. Hollis Johnson/Insider New Year's traditions look different depending on where you are and what religion and customs you follow. The Jewish new year of Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on September 18 this year.  We looked at five New Year's celebrations around the world — from the Chinese Lunar New Year to the Hindu New Year Diwali — to see how people around the world reflect on the past and prepare for the future. Read more stories like this on Insider. The Jewish new year of Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on September 18 this year, and communities around the world are gearing up to celebrate. There'll be apples dipped in honey to symbolize a sweet new year, and a trumpet-like instrument called a shofar to inspire growth and soul-searching in the year ahead. New Year's looks different depending on where you're from and what religion and customs you follow. For Songkran, the Thai new year celebrated in April, wonderfully aromatic dishes are served, and people...
    Three months after the demise of Bollywood actor Sushant Singh Rajput, his sister Shweta Singh Kirti on Monday shared that a plantation drive in the name of the late actor has given rise to over one lakh plants. Shweta took to Twitter to share a video featuring clips of Rajput’s fans planting saplings and also shared that over one lakh trees have been planted to celebrate the late actor. #FeedFood4SSR: Sushant Singh Rajput’s Sister Shweta Singh Kirti Initiates A Campaign To Feed The Poor In Memory Of The Late Actor “More than 1 lakh trees were planted across the globe. #Plants4SSR Thank you so much for making it happen,” she tweeted. The ‘Plants4SSR’ campaign was launched by Shweta on Twitter in remembrance of her brother, following which several fans of the actor across the globe joined the campaign and planted saplings. Shweta Singh Kirti Tweets ‘Dead Can’t Speak So Blame It on the Dead’ After Rhea Chakraborty’s Lawyer Makes ‘Drug Addict’ Remark at SSR Check Out Shweta Singh Kirti’s Tweet Below: More than 1 lakh trees ????were...
    The tech industry buzzword “gig” has distracted society from important questions about the gig economy that are surprisingly traditional: whether a business has employees or contractors, and how it can avoid payroll taxes and legal liability. Countless Silicon Valley business models have been built under the guise of gigs, Uber and Lyft two of the best known cases, which is ironic considering that for all of their high-tech pretensions, at the core both are taxi and food delivery services. But with state governments like California facing increasing revenue shortfalls and an estimated 57 million gig workers in the United States noting a lack of employer protections and fair wages, the matter has shifted to the courts. Uber and Lyft now find themselves at the center of years-long legal disputes on this question. Court challenges, however, are now extending beyond these two companies. Over the past 40 years, the rise of neoliberalism has enabled employers to tilt the terms of our capitalist economies heavily toward capital and away from labor, via the evisceration of unions, the deconstruction of the welfare state, and the privatization of public services. The growing...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — It could be just what you need right now. A website is now offering help for parents who need someone to look in on their children. Are you looking for a little extra help with your children? Well, what if we told you there was a place where you could pick from thousands of babysitters to engage your little ones in order to give you the extra time you need to focus on working from home or simply tackling a to-do list. There’s no catch aside from the fact that these babysitters sit by a screen. Babysits.com is an online babysitting platform located in the Netherlands that connects parents to babysitters around the globe. “A team member of mine, she did virtual babysitting for someone in Singapore and someone in Ireland,” said Babysits Community Manager Daniel Lawson. It’s currently being used in 38 countries by 1.5 million users and while it started as a place for those in search of care providers who would come to your home, Lawson mentioned that COVID-19 sparked more conversations and opportunities...
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