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    Trump Hotel is in Washington, DC Donald Trump makes a big show of giving away his annual paycheck to some agency each year. He can afford to, since the Secret Service has rewarded him with two years worth of pay just in the money it has spent on golf carts. Really. And then there’s the money that the Air Force has dropped at Trump’s Scottish golf resort. And how Trump has doubled the dues at several of his clubs so that people wanting insider access have to pony up at least $200,000 to bend his elbow in the buffet line (for the buffets that they are still having despite COVID-19). Assembling the full list of all the ways Trump has tapped his position to line his pockets over the last four years, is a project that will probably still be occupying scholars in the year 3020. However, there is at...
    New York Police Department has admitted that there is a 'troubling trend' in officers leaving the force, as budget cuts, anti-police feeling and tensions within the city and its politicians drive many to quit. In the year to October 6, 2,385 officers have submitted their retirement papers, the NYPD told Fox News - an 87 per cent increase last year. In 2019, over the same period, 1,274 officers retired. Resignations were also up. The department said 372 NYPD officers have resigned this year - five more than last year.  'The NYPD has seen a surge in the number of officers filing for retirement,' a spokesperson said in an email to Fox News this week.  'While the decision to retire is a personal one and can be attributed to a range of factors, it is a troubling trend that we are closely monitoring.' Protests in New York City calling for the...
    Colorado marijuana sales have topped $1 billion since the pandemic began, according to figures released this week by the state Department of Revenue. Legal marijuana sales topped $200 million in August for the second month in a row. Counting back to March of this year, when Colorado and the rest of the nation began shutting down over the pandemic, dispensaries have sold over $1.1 billion in marijuana products — and that's not counting sales in September and October, or back in February and January. And that's with prices at a three-year high. Readers had plenty to say about this record-breaking run in their Facebook comments on our story. Says Felicia: Good to see unemployment checks so well used. Adds Ed: No money to pay rent but plenty to purchase pot. Counters Josh: Is this the '50s? The MJ industry supports thousands of jobs...
    President Trump’s campaign bungled this week by running an online ad with a photo of Vice President Mike Pence, Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley that urged voters to “request your ballot” — and sent those who clicked to the campaign’s voter-sign-up page. It was just the latest in a string of foolish politicization of the military on both sides. Gen. Milley naturally said his likeness was used without his consent; just days before, he’d told NPR that the military plays no role in domestic politics. An earlier bungle came in the televised roll-call vote at the Democratic National Convention, when two soldiers from the Army Reserve’s 9th Mission Support Command appeared on-camera as the American Samoa delegation announced its votes. The delegation said it aimed merely to highlight Samoa’s commitment to service, but Defense Department rules prohibit wearing uniforms to...
    The focus of Governor Jared Polis's October 16 press conference was a plan for distributing a future COVID-19 vaccine that will be submitted to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention later today. But this information was accompanied by revelations regarding data about the novel coronavirus's current spread through the state, including a new record for daily cases and hospitalizations that continue to soar, with no end in sight. In revealing these figures, Polis encouraged people to cut back on gatherings. "If you have social plans this weekend with some friend to get together at their house or whatever it is, I suggest you avoid them for a few weeks," he said. The key Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment stats cited by Polis: 1,312 new positives today, as well as 352 hospitalizations. Those hospitalizations, he noted, are "the most since late May, and I am very concerned about this trend....
    SOUTH LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Two boys were shot to death in South Los Angeles, and the shooter or shooters were on the loose Friday morning.The boys were found in the 100 block of East 124th Street, near Main Street, about 11 p.m. Thursday and both were pronounced dead at the scene, according to Deputy James Nagao of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.Authorities say deputies initially responded to a crash in the area and found the victims suffering from gunshot wounds to the upper torso inside a vehicle.Additional information, including the ages and names of the victim, were not immediately released.A suspect description was not available.An investigation is ongoing.Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's Homicide Bureau at 323-890-5500.DEVELOPING: This report will be updated.City News Service contributed to this report.
    Two-and-a-half weeks before the election, top Trump administration officials in charge of immigration enforcement blasted Denver and other cities for their unwillingness to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. "Sanctuary city policies shield violent criminals, criminal aliens, at the expense of American lives," Chad Wolf, acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, said at an October 16 press conference announcing results of a recent ICE enforcement operation that targeted jurisdictions covered by field offices in Denver (which oversees Colorado and Wyoming), Philadelphia, New York, Seattle, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore. The operation had been telegraphed by the Washington Post, which reported on September 29 that the Trump administration was preparing an "immigration enforcement blitz" that would start in California and then expand to other places, including Denver. Related Stories GEO Group Coerced Aurora ICE Detainees Into Cleaning Common Areas Aurora Immigration Court Shuts Down Hearings After Major COVID Outbreak Colorado...
    Democratic Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan — who once called the police-free autonomous zone in her city a "block party" amid a "summer of love" — is now "deeply concerned" over the mass exodus taking place within the city's police department. What's the situation?KING-TV reported early Friday morning that a record number of officers had left the department in September, according to a new Seattle Budget Office report. The report noted that 39 officers and officers-in-training "separated" from the department while an additional 14 officers extended their leaves. The exodus is part of a continuing trend that has resulted in at least 118 officers leaving the force this year, KTTH-TV reporter Jason Rant said. He added that "even this number is misleading" because "many officers are using their accrued sick time as they begin their escape to other agencies or wait for retirement." The total number of officers in the...
    Denver has a lot to reckon with — gentrification, the political divide, racism, sexism and more — and that's exactly what the group Soul Stories is all about, says Creative Director Shelsea Ochoa. Through community gatherings, podcasts and large-scale performances, the organization tackles hard topics and works toward community healing. Now a year into the project, the group just released a podcast hosted by founder Danny Mazur and produced by Ochoa and former Westword staff writer and The Syndicate Podcast host Chris Walker; the show looks into the death of Elijah McClain, the 23-year-old massage therapist and violinist who died after a violent encounter with the Aurora Police Department in August 2019. Westword caught up with Ochoa to find out more about the podcast, which comes out today, October 16.  Related Stories Play It Forward: Alex Blocker Is Making Music for a Better World Lares Feliciano Mourns Victims of Police Violence in...
    Late last month, 38 members of the University of Denver swimming and diving crew were suspended from team activities through the fall quarter for allegedly attending a large party in violation of COVID-19 safety protocols. But a source tells Westword that some of these athletes have continued throwing bashes so large and boisterous that the Denver Police Department has been notified. The DPD says it has received such complaints but is unable to confirm whether the incidents involved DU students, let alone swimmers or divers. The university can't verify that, either, but a statement provided to Westword contains heavy threats against anyone who might engage in such activities. Meanwhile, the Denver Department of Public Health & Environment reveals that it has imposed quarantines on seven DU Greek houses and hit one sorority with a criminal summons over a get-together that is said to have included several people with the virus.Related Stories Dear...
    With Amazon.com Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN) setting up its second headquarters in Arlington, there’s a big push to develop a tech-savvy workforce in the region. And a number of universities in the D.C. area offer computer science and engineering degrees for those looking to snag a job with the e-commerce giant. But which school can boast the highest post-graduation income? We dove into the Department of Education’s post-graduation data to answer that question. While this research does capture earnings for some 2,200 of those who gained a bachelor’s degree within computer sciences and engineering at some of the largest universities in Greater Washington, there are some important caveats and limitations to note. All salaries listed are median earnings for the first year after graduation during 2016 and 2017, which are the most recent numbers available. The data is for students who received some federal financial aid, and the Department of Education...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Election Day is less than three weeks away, but mail-in voting is already happening in huge numbers and early voting starts on Monday. On top of it all, this is all happening in a pandemic and in an extremely divisive election. So far in Miami-Dade, over 484,000 ballots have been requested and more than 149,000 have been returned. In Broward, more than 567,000 ballots have been requested and nearly 187,000 have been returned. Interest is clearly high in Miami-Dade, where Supervisor of Elections Christina White is making sure it happens efficiently and accurately. White joined Eliott Rodriguez and Lauren Pastrana on CBS4 at 7 for a Q&A session about the unique circumstances around this election. Q: We know you tested all the machines recently. They’re ready to go? A: Yes, they are. We test our units multiple times before deploying them in an election. Yesterday was the...
    Savannah Rychcik October 15, 2020 0 Comments A onetime close friend and aide to Melania Trump is accusing the U.S. Justice Department of working on behalf of President Donald Trump to sue her over her tell-all book about the first lady. CNN’s Chris Cuomo noted the Department of Justice claims Stephanie Winston Wolkoff’s decision to write the book “betrayed” secrecy, which creates a national interest for the agency to file a lawsuit against her. “The Department of Justice has turned into the Trumps’ own police force, unfortunately. I expected nothing less from them. I didn’t expect for them to waste taxpayers’ money coming after me in regards to my personal relationship with Melania over 15 years,” Winston Wolkoff said. She added, “I think that they’ve opened up pandora’s box in reference to this contract and so there’s a lot still to be discovered, but it’s just, it’s so...
    Colorado marijuana regulators have adopted new waste management rules intended to reduce the industry's growing carbon footprint. According to the state Department of Public Health and Environment, 3,650 tons (7.3 million pounds) of marijuana plant waste was produced by the state's pot industry in 2019, and that number would be increased to 7,300 tons by a requirement that unused plant matter and product be mixed with waste such as sawdust, mature compost, bleach, coffee grounds, sand, glass or shredded paper — as long as the marijuana-to-waste ratio is 50/50. Although the state Marijuana Enforcement Division didn't remove or alter the 50/50 requirement as had been discussed at previous meetings, the MED did open up several paths around it in the department's latest round of extensive rule updates, adding new exemptions for biomass recycling and composting methods. According to CDPHE marijuana environmental impact researcher and small business consultant Kaitlin Urso, the new...
    SAN ANTONIO – A San Antonio Park Police Department sergeant, who avoided being suspended after telling a racist joke while on duty, has left the department months after the KSAT 12 Defenders exposed the incident. Sgt. Mike Burns retired Oct. 7, an official with the city’s Human Resources department confirms. City and SAPD officials have not released any other information about his exodus. His departure from the agency comes four months after the Defenders shed light on a 2019 internal affairs investigation of Burns, launched after he told an inappropriate joke to a fellow officer while at Travis Park. San Antonio park police supervisor avoided suspension after racist joke about Black, Hispanic people Burns responded to the downtown park in August 2019 after another officer broke up a disturbance between a Black man and a Hispanic man, records show. Burns told the officer the incident reminded him of a joke,...
    Much is being made in the media world about Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s Seventh Circuit ruling in a case involving the workplace use of the n-word. “US Supreme Court Nominee Ruled Using N-Word Doesn’t Make Workplace Hostile, Abusive. You Can’t Make This Up,” and “Let the Record Show: Amy Coney Barrett Draws Scrutiny for Ruling Saying ‘N-Word’ Doesn’t Prove a Workplace Is Hostile,” say the headlines. But is it really true? Do we really have a federal judge and Supreme Court nominee who has gone on record as saying that the n-word is NBD? In a word, no. Whatever Judge Barrett may personally think about the n-word, her Seventh Circuit ruling in Smith v. Illinois Department of Transportation makes no suggestion whatever that she believes use of the n-word is appropriate in the workplace or anywhere else. The ruling related to one employee’s case specifically, and not...
    Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Trader Joe's has set the bar for safety among grocery retailers in Colorado — but even the best practices can't guarantee that the novel coronavirus won't gain admittance. According to the latest report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the chain's Colorado Springs branch has suffered an outbreak. It's one in a wave of site-based infections that's set a new record for the third week in a row. The CDPHE considers an entity an outbreak after two or more COVID-19 cases among residents, staffers or other people connected to a specific location are confirmed within a fourteen-day period, or two or more cases of respiratory illness with an onset of symptoms within a fourteen-day period are paired with at least one additional COVID-19 diagnosis. The CDPHE's October 14 update lists 897 total outbreaks in the state so far: 274 active, 623 resolved. That's...
    Joe Biden's recollection that he was once "arrested" in apartheid South Africa, along with black congressional colleagues, was one of many statements he had to walk back during the Democratic primaries. But the eventual acknowledgment by Biden, now the Democratic presidential nominee, that the 1976 incident didn't happen as described contained a new set of errors. Details of the 1976 trip reviewed by the Washington Examiner show that the then-34-year-old Delaware senator was never in the South African city of Johannesburg, where the fictional arrest episode was said to take place. U.S. foreign policy toward South Africa was for years a high-profile issue for Biden, the former two-term vice president and 36-year Delaware senator. In 1986, as a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee preparing for what would be the first of three presidential bids, Biden grilled Reagan administration officials over U.S. relations with South...
    Melania Trump's former aide has called the First Lady and President Donald Trump 'hypocritical' for telling Americans how to handle the pandemic, but not revealing that her son Barron had COVID-19 and for failing to wear a mask on some public outings.   Stephanie Winston Wolkoff said it was a missed opportunity for the president and the first lady to finally connect with the average American, instead it was only Wednesday in an essay from Melania that the country even knew 14-year-old Barron Trump had also contracted coronavirus. Probed by Chris Cuomo on how Melania could lecture the country about getting on with things amid the pandemic, 'when she can't even get her husband' to follow health experts' advice, Wolkoff said, 'Because she doesn't do it the right way either.' Melania Trump's former aide has criticized the First Lady for keeping son Barron's COVID-19 infection secret Donald Trump and Melania...
    President Donald Trump hinted that he may fire Attorney General Bill Barr after Justice Department probes didn't indict any of his political enemies.  In a Newsmax TV interview that will air Wednesday night on 'Greg Kelly Reports,' Trump said it was 'too early' to determine if Barr would still have his job if there's a second Trump term.  'I have no comment. Can't comment on that. It's too early,' Trump said. 'I'm not happy with all the evidence I have, I can tell you that. I'm not happy,' he added.   President Donald Trump, captured leaving the White House for a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, told Newsmax TV that he was 'not happy' with Attorney General Bill Barr after Justice Department probes failed to indict any of his political enemies  President Donald Trump answered it was 'too early' to determine if Attorney General Bill Barr (pictured) would be staying...
    This week we learned that anti-government paramilitary groups discussed kidnapping Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam during the same June meeting in Ohio, where they plotted to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Witmer. On this week’s episode of “The Hunt with WTOP national security correspondent J.J. Green,” Scott Stewart, former State Department Counterterrorism agent, details how the plot evolved. toggle audio on and off change volume download audio Scott Stewart, former State Department Counterterrorism agent, on the plot to kidnap two governors SIGN UP TODAY for J.J. Green’s new national security newsletter, “Inside the SCIF.” The weekly email delivers unique insight into the intelligence, national security, military, law enforcement and foreign policy communities.
    As you might have guessed, the LAFD is pretty excited about its new tool. “It may make us rethink some of the ways we tackle fires when it’s available,” Ralph Terrazas, the chief of the LAFD, told The Los Angeles Times. The RS3 has already seen action on the field. On Tuesday, the fire department diverted the robot from a demonstration near Dodger Stadium to fight a fire that engulfed two Fashion District buildings in the city’s downtown core. It worked with more than 130 human firefighters to put out the blaze, helping to clear debris inside the building where the fire broke out.   If the RS3 looks more like a tank than any equipment your local fire department owns, it’s because it adapts a design the US army used to disarm improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan. It’s made by the same company that’s behind the Ripaw super tank. At $272,000 per...
    A firefighting robot got its first major test Tuesday in Los Angeles when it was put to use for the first time in the United States to battle a major blaze.  The Los Angeles Fire Department said the Thermite RS3 robot was supposed to have its official public introduction in the afternoon but got called into duty a few hours early due to a blaze downtown. "It had already gotten dirty at an early morning major emergency commercial structure fire that morning - proving its value from the start," the department said. ARMY AI-ENABLED ROBOTS MAY FIRE WEAPONS IN WAR TO DEFEND AGAINST ATTACKS The Thermite RS3, manufactured by Textron: Howe & Howe Technologies, is a compact robotic firefighting vehicle that features a low center of gravity and wide chassis. The Los Angeles Fire Department debuted the first robotic firefighting vehicle in the United States, putting it to use on its...
    In August, the Weld County District Attorney's Office revealed that a grand jury "has accepted the investigation into the death of Jonelle Matthews," a twelve-year-old who vanished from her Greeley home in late 1984 — although her remains weren't found in a rural Weld County field until 2019. Attention immediately turned to Steven Pankey, who had been named a person of interest in the case by the Greeley Police Department. Pankey was a resident of Idaho, and a prominent one, having twice run for governor of that state, in 2014 and 2018. Now, the 69-year-old Pankey has been formally indicted on five counts related to Matthews' death: murder in the first degree after deliberation, murder in the first degree/felony murder, second-degree kidnapping and two crime of violence charges.Related Stories Jonelle Matthews Death With Bizarre Tie to Politician Goes to Grand Jury Ex-Denver DA Using Familial DNA to Heat Up Cold...
    You have hits and misses when buying new weed. Lately, I've had a lot of misses. The weed itself has been fine, but my reaction to it — slow, groggy and despondent — has not been. Maybe this is a by-product of limiting myself to pre-orders out of ’rona fear and not engaging with budtenders before making my purchase (not that we're allowed to smell before we buy now anyway), or maybe my body is just changing; lord knows the shape of it has. Being the cheapskate that I am, though, an in-store-only sale was the only thing that was going to drag me inside a dispensary. And that's when I thought I'd found my dream strain for curing my weed woes. Initially presented with a lineup of potent OGs and Cookies varieties, I asked the budtender for something that was more on the straight-and-narrow path for daytime...
    The fatal shooting of Lee Keltner and the arrest of Matthew Dolloff on suspicion of first-degree murder following dueling demonstrations at Civic Center Park on October 10, has put 9News in the sort of awkward position broadcast outlets seek to avoid: being the story rather than covering it. The station had contracted with Dolloff to provide security for a crew assigned to the afternoon events: a so-called Patriot Muster involving ultra-conservative, pro-police forces and a BLM-Antifa soup drive scheduled around the same time as a way of countering the other group's messaging. Soon after Dolloff's arrest, the city reported that he was not licensed as a security guard in Denver; now, 9News says that its employees had no idea he was packing heat. The station has also released two new videos, including one showing an argument between Keltner and a Black Lives Matter protester in the moments before the shooting.Related...
    Hollywood has long ignored the actual identities and stories of Indigenous people and instead pushed hurtful stereotypes, degrading Native communities from the Americas and beyond. To remedy that and give a platform to Indigenous filmmakers, the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management, a law and policy organization, organized Denver's Indigenous Film and Arts Festival back in 2004. “The festival is a place where Indigenous people in Denver can celebrate their stories, where Indigenous youth can connect with role models and learn to appreciate the value of their stories and cultures," festival director and founder Jeanne M. Rubin explains. "Where mainstream audiences can learn about indigenous cultures from people representing themselves in film and art, telling their stories from their point of view.” Events run Wednesday, October 14, through January 13, with screenings, Q&As and discussions. Most years, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, the University of Denver’s anthropology department,...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — When it comes to archiving Pittsburgh’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, there is a plan in place. Did you know the city’s archive department is just three years old? This past spring, city leaders searched records to see how Pittsburgh handled the 1918 flu pandemic. But leaders quickly learned those records didn’t exist. Tucked deep inside the City-County Building sits the vault, a small room filled with papers. Archivist Nichols Hartley is very young, but his job is rooted in the past. From tri-fold paper ordinances to council records older than your great grandfather, it’s hard to believe that Hartley is the city’s first on the job. “When I started, it became apparent that whenever records became inactive and not frequently used in the office, were usually relegated to basements or closets,” said Hartley. He is joined by assistant Charles Succop, who helps Hartley scan everything they...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — The Maryland Department of Health has launched a statewide campaign encouraging everyone to get the flu shot as the state continues to battle the coronavirus pandemic. As part of the “Fight the Flu” campaign, a public service announcement will run on TV and on social media urging Marylanders to get the flu shot as soon as possible. CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES:  Coronavirus Resources: How To Get Help In Maryland TIMELINE: Coronavirus In Maryland, Tracking The Spread Latest coronavirus stories from WJZ Latest CDC Guidelines The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns reducing the spread of viruses like the flu is more important than ever to keep hospitals and doctors from getting bogged down with flu cases that would keep them from helping coronavirus patients. For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all of...
    A dispute over a contract bid involving a state-funded hemp research center is testing the industry's relationship with Colorado agriculture regulators and Governor Jared Polis's administration. The creation of a state Hemp Center of Excellence by the Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) was stipulated in a bill introduced in 2018 by state senator Don Coram, a hemp grower himself; the idea was to help direct U.S. Department of Agriculture-approved research, outreach and educational efforts for the state's hemp industry. But when the contract for the Hemp Center's initial management was awarded not to a hemp entity but to the Marijuana Policy Group, a firm that specializes in THC-related work, several influential industry members and trade organization reps — most of whom are ardent supporters of Polis's political career — called foul. In a July letter protesting the MPG's selection, over 100 hemp industry members and organizations, including Coram, voiced their concerns related...
    As a young cop in Richmond in 2008, Ben Murdoch made a mistake that cost him his career and led some to label him a racist. At a Halloween party, a Latino friend came dressed in a Ku Klux Klan outfit meant to be a costume of a pop culture character created by comedian Dave Chappelle — Clayton Bigsby, a blind Black man who is also a white supremacist. Murdoch, dressed as a rock star, and the friend began spoofing the Bigsby skit, he said, including giving a Nazi salute. A picture was taken and posted on social media. Local news picked it up, and two days short of finishing his probationary period, Murdoch said he was pressured to resign and has not worked in law enforcement since. “At the time you think it’s hilarious, and you don’t think about what you are doing,” Murdoch said recently....
    Colorado has seen over $1.1 billion in marijuana sales since the COVID-19 pandemic began in this country, according to figures from the state Department of Revenue. Legal marijuana sales topped $200 million in August for the second month in a row, reaching the second-highest monthly total since recreational sales started in 2014. Counting back to March of this year, when Colorado and the rest of the nation began shutting down over the pandemic, dispensaries have sold over $1.1 billion in marijuana products — and that's not counting sales in September and October. Dispensaries sold over $218.6 million worth of marijuana products in August, DOR data shows. Recreational sales accounted for more than $176.5 million (also the second-highest monthly total since 2014), while medical marijuana sales remained strong at just over $42 million.Related Stories Marijuana Sales Smash Previous Monthly Record, Cross $200 Million Colorado Pot Prices Reach Three-Year High, Up...
    This is the astonishing moment hundreds of shoppers rushed inside a new department store in Brazil ignoring social distancing guidelines. Scores of videos uploaded to social media show how the throng of shoppers pushed past each other Saturday at the opening of Havan in Belem, a city in the northern Brazilian state of Pará.  Images show a sea of frenzied customers desperate to grab a bargain with one video capturing the moment businessman Luciano Hang hypes up the customers outside prior to the opening of his 150th store - a day before he celebrated his 58th birthday. Customers are seen crowding into the 150th Havan megastore in Brazil as it opened its doors on Saturday Customers without facial coverings file through a Havan department store Businessman Luciano Hang appears behind a window at the Havan megastore in Belem The mass gathering forced Pará governor Helder Barbalho to...
    It's no longer a matter of debate: According to new data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, this state has been hit by a third wave of COVID-19. Key indicators of this status include a positivity rate just a whisper under the red line that government officials have cited as a reason for alarm and skyrocketing outpatient visits for people with symptoms of the novel coronavirus, as well as case and hospitalization counts that have climbed at a disturbing pace over the past month. Here are the grim statistics in major categories updated by the CDPHE at 4 p.m. Sunday, October 11, juxtaposed with figures from October 4 and September 13:Related Stories COVID-19: Polis on Why He's Extending Statewide Mask Order King Soopers' Response to Complaints About Poor Mask Use Inmate Claims COVID-19 Mess at Denver Jails 78,461 cases (up 5,385 from October 4 and 17,137 from...
    This week is a real free-for-all, with virtual events bringing the world to you. Take a serious or silly look at the upcoming election, meet artists and learn the latest on COVID-19. Then on Saturday, get out of the house for World Archaeology Day. Here are the ten best free things to do this week. COVID-19 Webinar: Colorado Six Months in Monday, October 12, 8:30 a.m. What has Colorado learned about the coronavirus since March? How has the state's response evolved since that first wave of cases in the spring, and what insights have we gained about communication, testing, tradeoffs and the efficacy of public-health guidance? During this free public webinar presented by the Colorado School of Public Health, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the Institute for Science & Policy, Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and Kacey...
    Loading the player... Flights between New York City and London may be possible during the holiday season. U.S. officials are interested in reopening international travel between the two popular destinations. President Donald Trump‘s administration is looking into a way to deliver passengers safety due to the availability of widespread coronavirus testing, according to The Wall Street Journal. Read More: American Airlines will drop flights to 15 cities in October “The growing availability of Covid-19 tests in the U.S. has prompted officials at the Transportation Department, Department of Homeland Security and other agencies to revive efforts to establish safe travel corridors between the U.S. and international destinations,” the Journal reported its sources said. International travelers are required to be tested before and after their flights. A Boeing 737 MAX airplane piloted by FAA Chief Steve Dickson lands Boeing Field to conclude a test flight, on September 30, 2020 in Seattle,...
    FORT LAUDERDALE (CBSMiami) – As Broward County schools continue to prepare for their staggered reopenings, Mayor Dale Holness said he’s confident the district is following safety protocols. Amid the recent COVID cases reported in Miami-Dade County Schools, he said they have gone the extra mile. “In fact, Broward County is putting some funds up for extra nursing staff throughout the schools. All this in efforts to protect the children,” said Holness. Download The New CBS4 News App Here Miami-Dade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said the district has taken appropriate measures of contract tracing. “I can assure you those cases were not contracted in our school buildings,” said Carvalho. On Friday, a student tested positive for COVID. This student will not be able to return to school until the Florida Health Department has provided clearance. The district has at least four other schools with cases confirmed by the Florida...
    The dueling protests at Civic Center Park on Saturday, October 9 — the so-called "Patriot Muster" and the BLM-Antifa Soup Drive scheduled as a counter point — were winding down when shots rang out by the Denver Art Museum. One protester went down, and Denver Police Department officers quickly arrested two suspects. We Believe Local Journalism is Critical to the Life of a City Engaging with our readers is essential to Westword's mission. Make a financial contribution or sign up for a newsletter, and help us keep telling Denver's stories with no paywalls. Support Our Journalism "I was walking towards the area, heard a gunshot, came up about two seconds later, and there was a guy on the ground who got shot in the chest, he was coughing up blood and his face was covered in it," says Madeline Kelly, who walked up on the scene.."The people who did...
    President Donald Trump indicated yesterday that Attorney General William Barr could have more than enough evidence to indict members of the Obama administration – including former President Barack Obama and former Vice President Joe Biden – for allegedly spying on his campaign in 2016. But, will the Department of Justice ever indict anyone involved? President Trump authorized the "total declassification" of any and all documents related to the Russia probe, as well as the FBI's investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's email debacle, on Tuesday. "I have fully authorized the total Declassification of any & all documents pertaining to the single greatest political CRIME in American History, the Russia Hoax. Likewise, the Hillary Clinton Email Scandal. No redactions!" Trump tweeted. Then, during a Thursday morning interview with Fox News' Maria Bartiromo, the president indicated that the DOJ has "plenty" of...
    Robert Faturechi October 10, 2020 1:29PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on ProPublica. It was caught on tape. A Seattle police officer lunged into the backseat of a patrol car. The Black woman detained inside had been combative, but she already had her hands cuffed behind her back. Still the cop punched her in the face, breaking an orbital bone. The Seattle Police Department moved to fire the officer for excessive force, but in November 2018, the cop's union lawyer was able to convince an arbitrator to overturn the termination. : The implications of the incident went beyond the officer. The entire Seattle Police Department was under an agreement reached with the Obama administration Department of Justice because its officers had a pattern of abuse similar to the incident in the patrol car. That agreement, known as a consent decree, forced the department under tight federal oversight until it...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) – The Pennsylvania Department of Health now recommends that those planning to travel to 26 states in the continental United States, should quarantine for 14 days upon returning. On Friday, the department updated its list, which now contains 26 states. Despite including over half of the United States, Pennsylvania’s closest neighbors, West Virginia, Ohio, New York, and New Jersey are not included in the list of states with a recommended 14-day quarantine. The full list of states can be found below. Alabama Alaska Arkansas Florida Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Wisconsin Wyoming More information on the Coronavirus pandemic: CDC Coronavirus Information CDC Global Map of Confirmed COVID-19 Cases Pennsylvania Department of Health Information Allegheny County Health Department Information...
    Alex Henderson October 10, 2020 9:56AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on AlterNet. U.S. Attorney General William Barr, one of President Donald Trump's most aggressive loyalists in Washington, D.C., has joined the president in claiming that mail-in voting encourages voter fraud. Reporter Jerry Lambe, in an article published by Law & Crime on October 7, discusses some of the reactions that legal experts have had to Barr's comments — noting that some of them believe he is setting a troubling precedent by interfering in an election. Citing reporting from ProPublica, Lambe explains that the U.S. Department of Justice has "advised U.S. attorneys' offices that a longstanding policy prohibiting the Department from interfering in U.S. elections will no longer preclude prosecutors who suspect election fraud from taking public investigative steps, even in the hours before polls close on November 3." : The DOJ's Public Integrity Section, according to Lambe, sent out an e-mail...
    The chief of Boston's largest police union is speaking out against the city Police Department's decision to cancel time off for officers in the weeks leading up to the election. Employees of the department were told in an email this week that they would not be allowed time off between the dates of Oct. 31 and Nov. 7 “in order to provide sufficient public safety for the week around the election.” The president of the Boston Police Patrolmen’s Association, Larry Calderone, said the decision was a “slap in the face” to officers who have dealt with an increase in criticism of the force. “They were not given any extra compensation or even given a public thanks or showing of appreciation,” Calderone wrote in a letter to the Boston Police Department. “Instead, our officers are vilified, assaulted, battered and even spat on. Never did we think such disrespect would come...
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that he would be releasing more of Hillary Clinton's emails after the president publicly criticized him about the subject on Fox News. Pompeo made the comments to Dana Perino of Fox News on Friday after the "Daily Briefing" host played for him criticism from the president about the lack of released documents. "They're in the State Department, but Mike Pompeo has been unable to get them out. Which is very sad. Actually I'm not happy about him for that reason," said Trump in the recording. "He was unable to get them out, and I don't know why, you're running the State Department, you get them out, forget about the fact that they were classified! Let's go! Maybe Mike Pompeo finally finds them, OK?" he added. Perino also played video from Trump criticizing Pompeo...
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Friday that more information about Hillary Clinton could be disclosed to the public before Election Day. Responding to complaints by an impatient President Trump, the nation's top diplomat told Fox News that the State Department is busy preparing for some sort of release that keeps national security interests protected. "We’ve got the emails, we’re getting them out," Pompeo said. "We're going to get all of this information out so the American people can see it. You will remember there was classified information on a private server. It should have never been there. Hillary Clinton should never have done that. It is unacceptable behavior." Since the 2016 campaign, Trump has dogged Clinton for her use of an unauthorized private email server, hosted in the basement of her home in Chappaqua, New York, while she was secretary of state from 2009 to 2013. Trump announced...
    When Microsoft and Wells Fargo recently pledged to hire more Black executives for senior management positions as part of a broader push to add diversity, the U.S. Department of Labor had a message for both of their CEOs: The companies' actions could be discriminatory.  In September 29 letters sent to lawyers for the technology and banking giants, the agency indicated that statements made by Microsoft chief Satya Nadella and Wells Fargo head Charles Scharf committing to significantly boosting the number of Black managers and employees could violate federal affirmative action laws. Scharf said in June that the company expects to be "doubling Black leadership" over the next five years and that top managers will be evaluated based in part on making progress toward that goal.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The executive's statements "appear to imply that employment action is being taken based on race," Craig Leen, director...
            by John Solomon  President Trump earlier this week vowed complete and final transparency in the Russia probe, ordering the declassification (without redaction) of all relevant documents that show how the false Russian collusion narrative was created by Hillary Clinton operatives and then investigated for three years by the FBI. With less than four weeks to Election Day 2020, there is little time to complete the mission so that voters can understand the foreign influence, dirty tricks and misconduct that began in the last presidential election and continued for years. So Just the News put together a list of the 40 most important documents yet to be released that would help America understand what really happened and who is most culpable. Most of the documents have been sought by Congress dating all the way back to 2017 and have been withheld from public release, mostly by...
    The notorious Manhattan lockup known as “The Tombs” will be shuttered along with a jail on Rikers Island by the end of November, the Department of Correction said Friday. The closures are part of the agency’s move to create four smaller jails in every city borough except for Staten Island, a plan created by the City Council when the chamber voted to shut down lockups on Rikers Island. “We are also taking advantage of the significant reduction in our current and projected jail population to continue closing older facilities that pose the most pressing administrative and structural problems. This will allow us to consolidate our efforts in better facilities, reduce overtime, expand training and programs, and continue investing in enhancing safety,” Cynthia Brann, the commissioner of the city DOC, wrote in a letter to staff. She added that staff members at the two jails — the Otis Bantum Correctional Center...
    Click here if viewing from a mobile device. At 10 a.m., Public Health Program Specialist Jamina Hackett discusses how community members can access HIV and STD testing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Related Articles Coronavirus: Where cases are rising and where they are falling in California As Trump hails Regeneron’s COVID-19 treatment, his administration tries to block the science it used COVID-19 survivors already fight stigma; worry Trump’s diagnosis will make it worse Bay Area jobs recovery from coronavirus: feeble Fox News viewers use fewer coronavirus safety precautions than CNN viewers, study finds
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG (KDKA) — For the third day in a row, Pennsylvania is reporting over 1,300 new cases of COVID-19. The Pennsylvania Department of Health is reporting 1,380 new cases of Coronavirus and nine additional deaths. The statewide total number of cases has risen to 169,308 since Thursday’s report, according to the state’s data. On Thursday, the state reported 1,376 new cases and 1,309 on Wednesday. The number of tests administered within the last seven days, between Oct. 2-8, is 211,544 with 7,805 positive cases, according to the Health Department. There were 34,228 test results reported to the department through 10 p.m. Thursday. The Health Department says all 67 counties in Pennsylvania have had cases of COVID-19. Current patients are either in isolation at home or being treated at the hospital. The statewide death toll has risen to 8,308 . There are 1,999,765 patients across the...
    Hours after we called out King Soopers for slacking on COVID-19 safety procedures, including a lack of crowd control and mask monitoring, the October 7 report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment publicly identified two of the grocery giant's metro stores as outbreak sites — the first time such a designation had been made in months. One of those stores was King Soopers #1, at 1331 Speer Boulevard. The company's most iconic Denver location, at Ninth and Corona, had been declared an outbreak site on May 12, and still marks the worst attack of the novel coronavirus suffered by King Soopers to date. By the time the CDPHE formally labeled that outbreak as resolved, thirteen staff members had contracted the disease and two had died from it. But one customer suggests that store didn't learn its lesson from the outbreak, and recently sent this missive to King Soopers'...
    The Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division has issued a recall of products from AlpinStash, a wholesale recreational marijuana cultivation in Lafayette. According to the October 8 recall, issued in conjunction with the state Department of Public Health and Environment, marijuana grown by AlpinStash was found to have potentially unsafe levels of mold and arsenic, making it Colorado's first marijuana recall ever issued over heavy metals. Heavy metals such as arsenic, nickel, copper, mercury and cadmium can be found found in growing nutrients and fertilizers used to enhance the flavor, yield and potency of marijuana. According to the National Institutes of Health, long-term exposure to heavy metals can lead to liver or kidney damage, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, heart abnormalities, a disrupted nervous system, anemia and more. Recalled products should have a cultivation facility license number on their packaging: 403R-00603. Here are the recalled AlpinStash strains and their harvest dates:Related Stories...
    The US Justice Department has sued Yale University over alleged discrimination against white and Asian American applicants after it accused the university of 'racially balancing' its classes. It comes about two months after the Justice Department publicly accused Yale of discrimination following a two year investigation, saying it was in violation of federal civil rights law. Filed in US federal court in Connecticut, the lawsuit alleges Yale 'discriminates based on race and national origin in its undergraduate admissions process, and that race is the determinative factor in hundreds of admissions decisions each year'.  The department said its investigation found that Asian American and white students have 'only one-tenth to one-fourth of the likelihood of admission as African American applicants with comparable academic credentials'. Yale called the lawsuit 'baseless' and said its admissions practices are fair and lawful. The US Justice Department has sued Yale University, saying its in violation...
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attends an event in Vatican City during his trip to Europe in October 2020.Vatican Pool/Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Before taking a long-scheduled trip to Rome last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo did perhaps the last thing you would expect from a diplomat planning to meet with Pope Francis. He launched a public critique of the Catholic Church, calling on the pope to end an arrangement between the Vatican and China that permits shared input on the appointment of bishops. “The Vatican endangers its moral authority, should it renew the deal,” Pompeo tweeted late last month. The criticism stunned Vatican officials, who promptly declined Pompeo’s request for a meeting with Francis last week. Popes do not regularly meet with US officials so close to a presidential election and, perhaps conscious of...
    More than six months after the last Denver fire chief resigned, Mayor Michael Hancock has chosen a new head of the Denver Fire Department, which is responsible not just for fighting fires but also responding to medical emergencies and other duties. At a press conference on October 8, Hancock introduced Desmond Fulton, a longtime member of the DFD who had been serving as deputy chief, as the person who will lead that department going forward. Fulton has "shown his commitment to our community and equity and to working to build a more inclusive department that reflects the community it serves," Hancock said before handing over the mic. Fulton noted that he's proud of the men and women with whom he's served, but said he also recognizes that there are certain cultural challenges within the department. "We’re in a different environment and different times. And we need to do a better job...
    Firefighter paramedic Jason Cortez (pictured) died on Wednesday morning in San Francisco, California  A San Francisco firefighter paramedic has died after he attended a department training exercise and fell three stories, officials said. San Francisco Fire spokesman Lt. Jonathan Baxter announced that Jason Cortez, 42, died on Wednesday morning after an accident at the Division of Training.   'This is a very trying time as Jason was well-liked in our department,' Baxter said during a press conference. Officials said that Cortez was at a San Francisco Fire Department training facility on 19th and Folsom Street when he was injured around 10am. Medical care was immediately administered to Cortez, who was rushed to the San Francisco General Hospital less than 10 minutes away. He succumbed to his injuries around 11am. Baxter did not provide details of the incident during the press conference and would not confirm the account with DailyMail.com, citing an ongoing...
    An inmate who's done time at Denver's Van Cise-Simonet Detention Center and the Denver County Jail in recent months contends that COVID-19 has wreaked havoc at the facilities. He describes being essentially placed in solitary confinement for nearly three weeks after being exposed to another detainee with the disease, frequent moves from pod to pod, low-level criminals being housed with the most dangerous accused felons as authorities scramble for quarantine spaces, and guards who tend to only don facial coverings to shut up men in custody screaming at them to mask up. "There's no way to avoid it once it gets in here," the inmate says of the virus. "It's so close in here that it'll spread like wildfire. It's just a matter of time." Daria Serna, a spokesperson for the Denver Sheriff Department, which is in charge of the jails, declines to address the specific claims of the inmate...
    A 'vivacious' mother-of-four married to a Los Angeles Fire Department paramedic has died after suffering a brain injury from jumping into the family pool.   Maria Davis, 43, was enjoying a 'fun-filled pool day' with her children at home in Southern California when an 'unfortunate jump' into the swimming pool left her with a traumatic brain injury she was unable to recover from.     Maria spent a week in hospital before she was taken off the life support machine on 26 September, according to a GoFundMe page set up for her funeral costs.    'We are deeply saddened to announce the tragic death of one of our own,' LAFD Fire Station 25 said in a Facebook post.   Maria Davis is pictured with her husband Greg before an 'unfortunate jump' into the swimming pool left her with a traumatic brain injury she was unable to recover from Maria's husband, Greg Davis, told...
    Hundreds of attorneys and judges are offering support to Justice Department officials who resign or speak out about what they say is “political misuse” of the department by Attorney General William BarrBill BarrTwo members of ISIS 'Beatles' cell arrive in US, appear at court hearing Overnight Defense: Two ISIS 'Beatles' indicted in US | Army Reserve investigating North Carolina Senate candidate | National Guard units on standby in case of unrest Justice indicts two members of ISIS 'Beatles' cell MORE in the lead-up to the Nov. 3 presidential election.  In an open letter, Lawyers Defending American Democracy, a nonpartisan group of legal professionals that includes attorneys and former federal and state judges, say they are expressing their support for Department of Justice (DOJ) officials who “may face difficult choices about participating in political misuse of the DOJ.”   “The public and these professionals should know that if they stand up to...
    Hours after we called out major Denver-area grocery stores, among others, for slacking on COVID-19 safety even as hospitalizations from the novel coronavirus are on the rise, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released its weekly outbreaks report; a record number of new entries include the first appearances in months by King Soopers and Costco outposts. Two King Soopers stores make the list, including King Soopers #1, at 1331 Speer Boulevard. The Costco is at 6400 West 92nd Avenue in Westminster. The CDPHE considers an entity an outbreak after two or more COVID-19 cases among residents, staffers or other people connected to a specific location are confirmed within a fourteen-day period, or two or more cases of respiratory illness with an onset of symptoms within a fourteen-day period are paired with at least one additional COVID-19 diagnosis.Related Stories Denver Stores Dropping Many COVID-19 Safety Procedures Polis Rips Trump as...
    Two ISIS fighters known as one half of the 'Beatles' terror group have been indicted of conspiracy to murder US citizens for the deaths American hostages in Syria and Iraq.  Alexanda Kotey, 36, and El Shafee Elsheikh, 32, are expected to make their first federal court appearance this afternoon in Alexandria, Virginia, an official from the Department of Justice told the Associated Press.  The pair are both British but renounced their citizenship when they joined ISIS in Syria in 2014.  They are accused by the State Department of murdering two dozen hostages including Americans James Foley, Steven Sotloff, Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller, and at least eight other hostages from different countries, including the UK.  Foley and Sotloff were journalists working in the region and Kassig and Mueller were aid workers.   Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, shown in March 2019, are being transferred from military custody in Iraq to the US and are...
    Two members of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) were in transit to the United States on Wednesday and were scheduled to appear in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, later Wednesday afternoon, a law enforcement source confirmed to CBS News investigative producer Pat Milton. The Associated Press reports the men are El Shafee Elsheikh and Alexanda Kotey, two of four men dubbed "the Beatles" by the hostages they held captive because of their British accents. The Justice Department is preparing to announce charges against them Wednesday, a law enforcement official told the AP.  Justice Department officials are scheduled to hold a new conference at 11 a.m. ET – Watch it live in the video player above.  The expected charges are a milestone in a years-long effort by U.S. authorities to bring to justice members of the group known for beheadings and barbaric treatment of American aid workers, journalists and...
    U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Sept. 23 in Washington.Oliver Contreras-Pool/Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.This story was published originally by ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. When the Justice Department recently publicized an ongoing investigation into potentially improperly discarded Trump ballots, critics accused it of violating long-standing agency policy against interfering in an election. But the unusual decision to publicly detail the Pennsylvania case may also have run afoul of guidelines that Attorney General William Barr himself issued to federal prosecutors this year, according to a memo obtained by ProPublica. In May, Barr wrote a directive to all Justice Department employees imploring them to be “particularly sensitive to safeguarding the Department’s...
    Justin Elliott - Robert Faturechi October 7, 2020 9:21AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on ProPublica. When the Justice Department recently publicized an ongoing investigation into potentially improperly discarded Trump ballots, critics accused it of violating long-standing agency policy against interfering in an election. But the unusual decision to publicly detail the Pennsylvania case may also have run afoul of guidelines that Attorney General William Barr himself issued to federal prosecutors this year, according to a memo obtained by ProPublica. : In May, Barr wrote a directive to all Justice Department employees imploring them to be "particularly sensitive to safeguarding the Department's reputation for fairness, neutrality, and non-partisanship" when it comes to election-related crimes. "Partisan politics," he wrote, "must play no role in the decisions of federal investigators or prosecutors regarding any investigations or criminal charges. Law enforcement officers and prosecutors may never select the timing of public statements (attributed or...
    Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions told five of the U.S. attorneys along the Mexican border that they needed to 'take away children' from their parents if they were illegal immigrants, no matter how young they are.  The shocking revelation was made during a two-year inquiry by the Justice Department's inspector general into President Trump's 'zero tolerance' family separation policy.  'We need to take away children,' Sessions told the group, according to participants' notes, the New York Times reports.  Notes added that he continued: 'If care about kids, don't bring them in. Won't give amnesty to people with kids.'  'We need to take away children,' Sessions told the group of AGs, according to a draft report from the Justice Department's inspector general According to Justice Department's inspector general Michael E. Horowitz, Sessions and other top officials understood that 'zero tolerance' meant separation and could also possibly deter future immigrants In...
    Microsoft's $150million diversity initiative is being investigated by the US Department of Labor after the company pledged to hire more black and African American leaders within the next five years. The DOL's Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) will probe whether or not the tech giant's new plan constitutes as racial discrimination and violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.   Microsoft announced the investigation in a corporate blog post on Tuesday, saying it plans to cooperate with the probe and maintained it is in compliance with the law. 'We have every confidence that Microsoft's diversity initiative complies fully with all US employment laws. We look forward to providing the OFCCP with this information and, if necessary, defending our approach,' Vice President and General Counsel Dev Stahlkopf said.   The US Department of Labor will investigate whether Microsoft's new diversity intiative constitutes as racial discrimination and violates Title VII of the Civil Rights...
    OAK CLIFF (CBSDFW.COM) – Police want to know who shot Rico, a brown and white Jack Russell-type dog found severely injured last month in east Oak Cliff. This is Rico, a sweet boy who deserves justice. (credit: Dallas Police Department) The shooting happened about 6 p.m. on Sept. 17 near the intersection of Lea Crest and Cardinal drives, just north of the 2600 block of Overton Road. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Dallas Police Department’s animal cruelty unit at 214.671.0111, reference case #166451-2020. Anonymous tips can be left with Crime Stoppers at 877-373-TIPS.
    The iconic Central Park Boathouse has had to shut its doors and permanently lay off 163 furloughed staff as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Staff at the Boathouse restaurant in New York have been let go due to 'unforeseeable business circumstances prompted by COVID-19', according to a Department of Labor notice. The Loeb Boathouse has been one of the most famous locations in Central Park since it first opened in 1954 and has featured in movies including When Harry Met Sally. The iconic Central Park Boathouse in New York has had to shut its doors and permanently lay off 163 furloughed staff as a result of the coronavirus pandemic The Loeb Boathouse has been one of the most famous locations in Central Park since it first opened in 1954 and has featured in movies including When Harry Met Sally (pictured) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    Members of the Banditos are recognized by skull and sombrero tattoos  L.A. County's Inspector General's Office has produced a damning report into a 'gang-like' secret society of cops, known as the Banditos, who it claims are protected by a code of silence among officers including L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva.  The Inspector General's Office launched an investigation into the allegedly violent group amid claims they and other fractions of L.A. cops had operated like gang-sects for years, wielding their influence over co-workers and the public.  It also came after the sheriff's department was told to pay $55million in settlements to people who had been victimized by the groups.  Among claims in the various lawsuits was that the Banditos are 'a group of approximately 90 deputies who are inked with matching tattoos of a skeleton with a thick mustache, sombrero, pistol, and bandolier'. In a report released on Tuesday, the...
    Washington (CNN)Two high-profile ISIS fighters in US detention overseas are expected to be transferred to the US in the coming days, a US official told CNN Tuesday.Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee Elsheikh, dubbed "the Beatles" because of their British accents, were part of an ISIS execution cell that have been accused by the State Department of "holding captive and beheading approximately two dozen hostages," including American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff and American aid workers Peter Kassig and Kayla Mueller.American ISIS member pleads guilty to supporting terror groupKotey and Elsheikh had their UK citizenship revoked for being considered a national security threat after joining ISIS in Syria. They had been held in US detention in Iraq, where they were among several high-profile ISIS prisoners transferred to US military custody after Turkey launched a military incursion into northern Syria in 2019, raising concerns about the security of the prisons operated...
    The most recent COVID-19 outbreaks report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment set an unfortunate record for new entries, including three Greek houses at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. Add the outbreaks at Phi Delta Theta, Pi Kappa Phi and Sigma Pi to one at Kappa Sigma in early September and another pair (Chi Omega and Gamma Phi Beta) later in the month and that's a total of six fraternities or sororities at the school that have been hit by the disease — and that number doesn't include the two dormitories placed under quarantine amid a rise in Colorado case counts largely attributable to infections among college students. Unlike the University of Colorado Boulder, which made a temporary shift to remote learning after its COVID-19 numbers began spiking, CSU is still holding in-person classes. But judging from our visit to Fort Collins on Saturday, October 3,...
    On March 1, 2019, back when few mainstream politicians used the term "systemic racism" while discussing law enforcement aimed at people of color, Boulder Police Officer John Smyly starred in a viral video that captured his over-the-top harassment of Zayd Atkinson, a Black student at Naropa University he rousted for picking up trash on his own property. Smyly subsequently resigned in advance of likely suspension or firing, and Boulder agreed to pay Atkinson a reported $125,000 settlement over the episode. Nonetheless, Smyly is still earning a paycheck from Boulder. According to the Boulder Daily Camera, he remained an official employee of the city's police department until February 2020 as a result of vacation time, administrative leave and sick days he'd collected prior to his supposed exit. Moreover, he was hired in January for what the paper described as "a two-year term position as a civilian training and development coordinator" in...
    Yesterday, SpaceX received a contract worth more than $149 million from the Space Development Agency (SDA), tasking the company with building a new satellite for the US military capable of tracking and providing early warnings of hypersonic missile launches. Another company, L3 Harris out of Florida, was given more than $193 million by the agency to also build tracking satellites. The satellites are meant to be the first crucial part of the SDA’s Tracking Layer Tranche 0, which is designed to provide missile tracking for the Defense Department from space using infrared sensors. SpaceX and L3 Harris will together build eight satellites to deliver to the DOD for the Tracking Layer — the first satellites in a planned constellation. Designed to provide missile tracking from space using infrared sensors The Tracking Layer will work in partnership with the SDA’s proposed Transport Layer, another planned constellation of between 300 and 500...
    Though Denver Public Schools will be shut down until October 16, the Denver Public Library is just starting a soft reopening, and many workers for the City and County of Denver are doing their gigs from home, Halloween is still happening. The holiday comes as coronavirus cases rise nationally and President Donald Trump, who is dealing with COVID-19, mugs as though he's doing fine and encourages residents of the United States not to be scared. But plenty of people are, especially as they contemplate kids and trick-or-treat activities. And so the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment has released a set of guidelines regarding what people can do to reduce their risk of transmitting or catching the virus as they celebrate Halloween. The guidelines are based on the county's current status on the state's COVID-19 Dial Dashboard, where Denver falls somewhere in the middle, under Safer at Home, Level 2 Concern, with enough cases...
    Colorado State University-Pueblo will offer a new hemp agriculture degree program next fall, funded in part by the United States Department of Agriculture. CSU-Pueblo already offers other cannabis degree programs and has been home to the Institute of Cannabis Research since 2016; current undergraduates can pursue a bachelor's degree in cannabis biology and chemistry or a minor in cannabis studies. Starting next year, however, students can narrow their studies to focus on industrial hemp, thanks to a new research program starting up at several colleges around the country. CSU-Pueblo's Industrial Hemp Education, Agriculture and Research (InHEAR) program will require students to take courses specifically tailored toward agricultural hemp research and either do an internship with one of CSU-Pueblo’s hemp industry partners or conduct research at the Institute of Cannabis Research. Development of the new curriculum is funded by a $275,000 grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture; similar degrees are...
    Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia, right, celebrates the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court in the the Whole House Rose Garden, Sept. 26. Alex Brandon/AP Photo For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.At a briefing on Oct. 4, in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak that has enveloped President Donald Trump and about a dozen of his close associates, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany declined to reveal how many workers at the White House had contracted the virus. She cited “privacy concerns we take very seriously.” Within 24 hours, McEnany herself—who didn’t don a mask while addressing reporters—and two of her assistants had tested positive for the disease; as had two White House housekeeping staffers, who “didn’t come in direct contact” with the first family, reported New York Times correspondent Maggie Haberman. Meanwhile, at least three...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City They’ve had it with the city! The condo boards of three luxury developments along the Williamsburg waterfront are suing the city for upwards of $2 million, claiming Parks Department officials have failed to maintain the publicly-managed private greenspaces and piers fronting their buildings for years, while also allowing raucous revelers to party late into the night. “It’s become a dumping ground, where you can drink, smoke weed, and party at night,” said Keith Berger, the president of the condo board for 1 Northside Piers at Kent Avenue and N. Fifth Street. “If you look at Brooklyn Bridge Park or Long Island City … they have become a destination point in a positive way, our [waterfront park] has become a destination point in a negative way.” Berger’s building, along with neighboring 2...
    In the past week or so, four states — New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and New Mexico — have categorized Colorado as a high-risk location because of rising COVID-19 rates, and mandated that visitors from Colorado quarantine prior to moving freely within their borders. While some of the numbers that led to Colorado's recent undesirable status have started to moderate, the latest figures from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment show that current hospitalizations have risen to a level not seen for months. Here are the COVID-19 stats in major categories as updated by the CDPHE at 4 p.m. October 4, juxtaposed with those from one week earlier. 73,076 cases (up 3,367 from September 27) 7,673 hospitalizations (up 150 from September 27) 64 counties (unchanged) 2,068 deaths among cases (up 27 from September 27) 1,968 deaths due to COVID-19 (up 28 from September 27) 798 outbreaks (up 62 from...
    Princeton University President Christopher Eisgruber is likely heaving a huge sigh of relief that the attention of the nation’s media is focused on COVID’s infestation of the White House, the Senate battle over the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and, of course, the looming national election. Were it not for these stories (and a handful of other newsworthy events such as continuing violence in one American city after another), Eisgruber’s September 2 letter openly admitting that the fabled Ivy League school engages in “systemic racism,” would be vying for front-page news coverage. Eisgruber’s letter, however, did not escape the eye of lawyers at the U.S. Department of Education; and it should not be allowed to be swept under the rug. Two weeks after the Princeton President’s highly unusual mea culpa, Robert King, the Education Department’s Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, sent a letter to the university demanding...
    Hong Kong (CNN Business)Washington is taking aim at another Chinese tech firm. SMIC (SMICY), China's biggest chipmaker, has warned investors that new US restrictions could cut it off from key technology and have "material adverse effects" on its business.Taiwan could become the next flashpoint in the global tech war Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation said in a filing to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Sunday that its American suppliers have been issued letters from the US Commerce Department about rules for working with the chipmaker. Under US export regulations, "accessories and raw materials to SMIC will be subject to further restrictions," and prior application for an export license is required before selling to SMIC, the Chinese company said. SMIC did not go into further detail. The company was already dealing with other US restrictions, having been barred from supplying Huawei, the Chinese smartphone maker and 5G network supplier that is...
            by Curtis Ellis  New developments reveal the breadth and depth of the Chinese Communist Party’s war against America. Last week, federal authorities charged a New York City police officer with being a paid agent of the CCP for the past six years. The indictment says handlers in the Chinese consulate had officer Baimadajie Angwang, a naturalized U.S. citizen, keeping tabs on Tibetans living in New York. Angwang was being directed by the China Association for Preservation and Development of Tibetan Culture, part of the CCP United Front Work Department responsible for “neutralizing sources of potential opposition to the policies and authority” of the CCP, according to federal prosecutors. The United Front Work Department is the CCP’s official overseas propaganda tool, one of the party’s “Magic Weapons,” in the words of Chairman Mao. When the CCP seeks to “neutralize” opponents nothing is off the table, particularly...
    Firefighters in California rescued an orphaned mountain lion cub last month that was burned as a result of the Zogg Wildfire and required medical attention at a local zoo.  Captain Cal, named after Cal Fire's mascot, was discovered on September 30 in an area that the fire had blazed through. He is believed to only be four to six weeks old, the Oakland Zoo shared in a release.  Cal Fire captured the cub and contacted the Shasta County Sheriff's Department, who then contacted the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW).  Captain Cal, an orphaned cub believed to be four to six weeks old, was found on September 30 in an area where the Zogg Wildfire blazed through Vets with the CDFW sought help from veterinarians from the Oakland Zoo, who received the cub on the night of October 1. The CDFW has been working tirelessly to save animals...
    CARSON (CBSLA) – A Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy was hospitalized early Friday morning with a self-inflicted gunshot. The sheriff’s department confirmed that the accidental shooting occurred at around 5:10 a.m. She was taken to Harbor UCLA Medical Center in West Carson by other deputies, the sheriff’s department told CBSLA. Her condition was unknown. It’s unclear where and how the shooting occurred.
    Click here if viewing from a mobile device. At 10 a.m., Santa Clara County health officers discuss the health and well-being of the Latinx migrant population during the COVID-19 pandemic. Related Articles RNC chairwoman Ronna McDaniel tests positive for coronavirus San Jose State football skips past health orders, officials to clear Humboldt path President Trump’s positive COVID-19 test throws country into fresh upheaval Asian Americans still being targeted in COVID-related hate incidents 2 Ralphs workers died from COVID-19 and the chain didn’t tell Cal/OSHA, state says
    The Department of Education has yet to decide on a grading system for the new academic year, The Post has learned. Traditional letter grades were controversially scrapped for K-8 kids last year due to coronavirus turmoil and the abrupt switch to remote learning. The DOE said those changes were temporary at the time but conceded Thursday that they have yet to revert to conventional grading given continuing COVID-19 fears. A spokesperson said that the system will likely be adjusted again with the continuation of remote instruction this year. “As we did last year, we will support schools in adapting their policies to acknowledge the impact of remote learning and any overarching citywide changes,” Danielle Filson said. She said a final grading system will be revealed in the coming weeks. “We have been full steam ahead for a reopening that prioritizes health, safety and high-quality instruction for all students,” Filson said....
    CHICAGO — Earlier this week, Chicago Police Supt. David Brown laid out the many challenges facing police officers this year. Aside from dealing with high crime and large-scale protests, he said more than 900 Chicago Police officers have tested positive for coronavirus, and he expects that number to surpass 1,000 by the end of the year. COVID-19 has hit police departments hard across the country and has been the leading cause of death among officers in 2020 nationwide. This has caused Chicago residents to wonder: If COVID-19 is hitting the department so hard, why aren’t many officers wearing masks despite being required to do so? Essentially, according to the police union and department leaders, it’s not a top priority. “I think the average officer is probably less worried about COVID and more worried about the horrendous working conditions and hours that they are being forced to work...
    The Bronx and Manhattan rank the lowest on a mayoral scorecard for the cleanliness of city streets, as garbage has piled up in the boroughs following $100 million in cuts to the Sanitation Department. “This isn’t a surprise. Every day, Bronxites see and live with the results of City Hall’s divestment in the sanitation and quality of life in our borough,” Councilman Mark Gjonaj told The Post Thursday. “I appreciate that our city is facing a fiscal shortfall, but now is not the time to cut and run on the basic needs of the communities that need us most,” the Bronx Democrat said. His office has started working with local groups to clean the continuously trash-strewn area around the 6 train stop on Westchester Avenue at the intersection of Buhre and Crosby avenues. An official mayoral report of “acceptably clean city streets” showed declines across the five boroughs in...
    Rome — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s opposition to a controversial Vatican deal with China is a mere “tactical difference” between partners, U.S. officials said following his visit to the Holy See. “The Vatican's playing the long game when it comes to human rights and religious liberty,” a senior State Department official told reporters Thursday. “Tactical agreements and tactical differences will come and go, but the broader strategic vision, the United States and the Vatican are in lockstep and have been for generations, and will be for generations to come, I think.” Pope Francis’s team rebuffed Pompeo’s denunciation of an agreement designed to facilitate the appointment of bishops in mainland China through a mechanism that gives Beijing some influence over the selection. Pope Francis is treating China with “kid gloves” throughout the talks, according to another American ambassador, but Pompeo’s team emphasized that Holy See and the State Department cooperate...
    An anti-masker launched into an angry tirade at a Subway sandwich shop after staff refused to serve him.   The heated exchange between a customer and 'sandwich artist' at a Subway store in the US was captured on video that went viral on Twitter this week.  A fellow patron began recording while waiting in line behind an unidentified man who stepped up to the counter without a mask - despite a local face covering requirement inside businesses.  The female employee behind the counter calmly explains that she can't serve him as the man repeatedly shouts at her to ignore the health department's warnings.  'I want my sandwich!' he cries.  Scroll down for video An anti-masker was dubbed 'Sandwich Karen' after video showed him launching into an angry tirade at a Subway store in the US because staff refused to serve him  The man repeatedly screamed: 'I want my sandwich!'...
    This article was produced by ProPublica. It was caught on tape. A Seattle police officer lunged into the backseat of a patrol car. The Black woman detained inside had been combative, but she already had her hands cuffed behind her back. Still the cop punched her in the face, breaking an orbital bone. The Seattle Police Department moved to fire the officer for excessive force, but in November 2018, the cop’s union lawyer was able to convince an arbitrator to overturn the termination. The implications of the incident went beyond the officer. The entire Seattle Police Department was under an agreement reached with the Obama administration Department of Justice because its officers had a pattern of abuse similar to the incident in the patrol car. That agreement, known as a consent decree, forced the department under tight federal oversight until it reformed itself. The Seattle police had already made a string of...
    The latest weekly COVID-19 outbreaks report from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has the most entries since the start of the pandemic, a stunning 53. A large chunk of the sites included in this batch is associated with educational institutions, paced by Greek houses at major colleges and universities: seven, bringing the total to fourteen over just two weeks. And that's not counting the positive or probable novel coronavirus cases at the University of Colorado Boulder, currently nearly 1,700. The CDPHE considers an entity an outbreak after two or more COVID-19 cases among residents, staffers or other people connected to a specific location are confirmed within a fourteen-day period, or two or more cases of respiratory illness with an onset of symptoms within a fourteen-day period are paired with at least one additional COVID-19 diagnosis. The department's new update, released September 30, lists 770 outbreaks: 195 active, 575...
    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The coming weekend could be the best of the fall for Maine's leaf peepers. Most of the state is experiencing peak fall foliage conditions, while coastal and southern Maine are showing moderate color change, the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation & Forestry said. Northern Maine typically peaks earlier than the rest of the state, and parts of the far north are already past peak, the forestry department said. “The lack of rain this summer and the early widespread frost jumpstarted the progression of foliage colors this season,” noted Gale Ross, the department's fall foliage coordinator. The state is encouraging leaf watchers to practice social distancing while peeping this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Maine
    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — An elementary school teacher in Eugene has been named Oregon’s 2021 Teacher of the Year, making her the first Bethel School District teacher to win since the award program started in 1955. Nicole Butler-Hooten was honored by the Oregon Department of Education on Tuesday afternoon, The Register-Guard reported. After 14 years working at Irving Elementary, the second grade teacher is described by district leaders as an organized, consistent teacher who leads with compassion and acceptance of students’ cultures. As a Siletz woman and member of the Apache Tribe who identifies strongly with her indigenous lineage, her teaching centers around equity and connecting with families. Superintendent Chris Parra called her a “warm demander,” which he said is someone who has high expectations for students but pushes them with care. Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill and Gov. Kate Brown crashed a Zoom staff meeting to surprise...
    Absentee voter ballots have been delivered to the Prince George’s County Department of Corrections in Maryland, and those locked up who are eligible but not registered to vote will get their chance to register starting Thursday. A get-out-the-vote effort has been launched among special populations in Prince George’s County, which includes those being held at the county jail. “This initiative is about ensuring that everyone who has the right to vote has the ability to vote, and so we’re reaching out to all segments of our community, including those who are ‘behind the wall,’ those who are incarcerated, pre-trial, or serving time for misdemeanor offenses and are eligible to vote,” said Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Aisha Braveboy. After examining a list of inmates being held by the Prince George’s County Department of Corrections, the county Board of Elections has provided absentee ballots and voter registration forms for those who...
    Click here if viewing from a mobile device. At 10 a.m. PT, Santa Clara County Public Lead Information Offcers, David Campos and Betty Duong discuss businesses operating in Tier 2 (Red) and questions regarding moving to Tier 3 (Orange). Related Articles Palo Alto school board approves reopening plans amid growing teacher, parent outcry Sunday’s Titans-Steelers game postponed because of coronavirus Elon Musk doubles down on Covid-19 skepticism and says he won’t take future vaccine California ‘very close’ to reopening theme parks, state official says Coronavirus spread increasing in Marin County as statewide cases fall