Sunday, Dec 05, 2021 - 16:30:46
1000 results - (0.004 seconds)

a health care:

latest news at page 1:
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A divided federal appeals court Sunday rejected Florida’s request to at least temporarily block a Biden administration rule that would require health-care workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19. A panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 decision, turned down a motion by Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody for an injunction against the Biden administration rule while the Atlanta-based court considers the vaccination requirement. READ MORE: Experts Believe Other States Could Switch To Electric Mowers Like CaliforniaThe decision said the state “failed to make the requisite showing for an injunction pending appeal.” Judges Robin Rosenbaum and Jill Pryor made up the majority, while Judge Barbara Lagoa dissented. The one-page decision said full opinions would be issued later. Sunday’s decision, however, did not mean the Biden administration can move forward with the health-care worker vaccination requirement Monday, as originally planned. That is because a Louisiana federal judge last week issued a nationwide preliminary injunction against the Biden administration rule. Nevertheless, lawyers in Moody’s office requested the 11th Circuit also issue an injunction because the...
    Historically, behavioral health treatment has been viewed more so a social service than specialty healthcare. There were limited agencies across the state that provided access, funding was limited, and somewhere between the cloak of 42 CFR Part 2 and the rooms steeped in anonymity we didn’t have a ton of good outcomes data to back us up. As a field, we were just doing what we felt was the right thing; you know “keeping what we had, by giving it away” – sometimes literally. In 2018 the field saw the single largest change it had ever undergone, the behavioral health redesign. The traditional healthcare and behavioral healthcare budgets were merged at the state Medicaid level. Clinicians were tasked with demonstrating medical necessity to justify client placement in certain programs. We were all introduced to managed care organizations (MCO’s) presenting multiple different processes and preferences for prior authorizations, standards of care, and reimbursement for services rendered. In short, one day we woke up and went to work in a totally different environment – and we weren’t playing on Rookie mode anymore...
    EXETER, NH (CBS) – Hospital leaders in New Hampshire are warning that the state’s healthcare system is under stress due to the latest increase in COVID-19 cases. “We want the public to know that the health system in all of New Hampshire is under the most duress I’ve seen in 25 years of working as an emergency physician,” said Dr. Neil Meehan, Chief Physician Executive at Exeter Hospital. READ MORE: UMass Memorial Health In Worcester Runs Out Of ICU BedsOn Friday, the New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services announced 1,450 new positive cases. Meehan says 25 to 35 percent of patients at Exeter have COVID. Other patients have delayed care, causing overflow issues. “We are more than 100% capacity and that’s been going on for days. Our emergency room is housing people up to 125, 150% of our capacity,” Meehan said. The hospital is getting creative to deal with the influx by treating overflow patients in the surgical recovery area and even in a decontamination bay. READ MORE: Shakeel Bodden Charged With Murder In Stabbing...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – A man was arrested Thursday morning during an FBI raid on a residence in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Northridge in connection with a hospice fraud investigation. Dec. 2, 2021. (CBSLA) Oganes Doganyan, 49, was taken into custody at around 5 a.m. in the 17600 block of Parthenia Street, an FBI spokesperson confirmed to CBSLA. Doganyan is under arrest along with 38-year-old Kristine Arutyunyan of Glendale. Both are accused with paying illegal kickbacks in a healthcare fraud scheme. According to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the two “paid illegal kickbacks for the referral of Medicare beneficiary information that could be used to bill for purported hospice services.” The two caused fraudulent claims to be billed to Medicare for hospice services that were “medically unnecessary” and “not eligible for reimbursement.” Both are charged with federal counts of conspiracy to commit health care fraud, health care fraud, conspiracy to pay and receive kickbacks, and paying kickbacks. If convicted as charged, each faces a maximum sentence of up to 35 years in federal prison.
    ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — At a playground outside a North Texas day care, giggling preschoolers chase each other into a playhouse. Toddlers scoot by on tricycles. Just uphill, Total Energies is pumping for natural gas. The French energy giant wants to drill three new wells on the property next to Mother’s Heart Learning Center, which serves mainly Black and Latino children. The wells would lie about 600 feet from where the children play. The prospect is raising fears among families and the surrounding community. Living too close to drilling sites has been linked to a range of health risks from asthma to neurological and developmental disorders. And while some states require energy companies to drill farther from day cares and homes, Texas has made it difficult for localities to fight back. On Tuesday night, the Arlington City Council voted 5-4 to approve Total’s latest drilling request, with expected final approval in the weeks to come. Last year, the council denied Total’s request at a time when Black Lives Matter protests after George Floyd’s murder by police led many American communities...
    A federal judge in Louisiana issued a nationwide preliminary injunction Tuesday against President Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers. Judge Terry A. Doughty in the U.S. District Court Western District of Louisiana ruled in favor of a request from Republican Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry to block an emergency regulation issued Nov. 4 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that required the COVID shot for nearly every full-time employee, part-time employee, volunteer, and contractor working at a wide range of healthcare facilities receiving Medicaid or Medicaid funding. Louisiana was joined in the lawsuit by attorneys general in 13 other states. OSHA SUSPENDS ENFORCEMENT OF COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATE FOR LARGE BUSINESSES Doughty argued in his ruling that the Biden administration does not have the constitutional authority to go around Congress by issuing such a mandate. "If the executive branch is allowed to usurp the power of the legislative branch to make laws, two of the three powers conferred by our Constitution would be in the same hands," he wrote. "If human nature and history teach anything, it...
    In July, President Joe Biden issued a series of rules requiring that federal workers, and workers at companies that receive federal contracts, must be vaccinated. That included health care workers who work for hospitals that receive Medicare or Medicaid payments. However, earlier this month, a three-judge panel in Texas blocked the implementation of the mandate for many large companies. Now, as The Washington Post reports, a federal district judge in Missouri has acted to block even the mandate for health care workers. That includes workers dealing face-to-(hopefully-masked-)face with COVID-19 patients in emergency rooms and workers caring for those most vulnerable to bad outcomes in nursing homes. What both rulings have in common is simple enough: Trump-appointed judges. Unsurprisingly, the ruling from District Judge Matthew Schelp is filled with the kind of political language that might be expected from a Trump appointee, with statements including claims that implementing the rule would create a “...politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate...” The ruling also flatly accepts unsupported claims by a group of Republican state attorneys, headed by radical right Missouri attorney...
    Q: I just want my own records from a hospital, but have to submit a specific form to comply with HIPAA.  The form seems burdensome. What is HIPAA and what is the reason for it? A.L., Long Beach Ron Sokol  A:  HIPAA is the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which was enacted in 1996. The primary purpose of HIPAA is to protect patient privacy. Hence, sensitive patient health information cannot be given to others unless authorized or consented to by the patient. Privacy of your health records is considered very important. Note that HIPAA applies to health care providers, health plans, health care clearinghouses, and business associates engaged in such activities as claims processing, data analysis, utilization review and billing. HIPAA therefore impacts doctors, dentists, chiropractors, psychologists, nursing homes and hospitals, among others. Q:  If there is a HIPAA violation, what should be done and is there any real consequence? G.D., Marina Del Rey A:  If a HIPPA breach occurs, notice must be provided to: (a) the affected individual, (b) the federal Secretary of Health and Human Resources...
    Nurses conduct coronavirus testing at a drive-thru site at in El Paso, Texas. In July, President Joe Biden issued a series of rules requiring that federal workers, and workers at companies that receive federal contracts, must be vaccinated. That included health care workers who work for hospitals that receive Medicare or Medicaid payments. However, earlier this month, a three-judge panel in Texas blocked the implementation of the mandate for many large companies. Now, as The Washington Post reports, a federal district judge in Missouri has acted to block even the mandate for health care workers. That includes workers dealing face-to-(hopefully-masked-)face with COVID-19 patients in emergency rooms and workers caring for those most vulnerable to bad outcomes in nursing homes. What both rulings have in common is simple enough: Trump-appointed judges. Unsurprisingly, the ruling from District Judge Matthew Schelp is filled with the kind of political language that might be expected from a Trump appointee, with statements including claims that implementing the rule would create a “...politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate...” The ruling also flatly accepts unsupported claims by a group of Republican...
    "Congress did not clearly authorize CMS to enact the this politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate, which Supreme Court precedent requires," he declared.What was the reaction?Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R), who led the lawsuit, celebrated the ruling. "Our system of checks & balances, federalism, separation of powers was meant to protect individual liberty. The belief in individual rights is one of America’s great legacies," he said. "Our win today vs. the Biden healthcare worker vaccine mandate is a win for workers & a win for liberty." CMS has not yet issued a statement. The agency, however, told Reuters it is reviewing the ruling and continued to claim that unvaccinated health care workers pose a threat to safety.
    "Congress did not clearly authorize CMS to enact the this politically and economically vast, federalism-altering, and boundary-pushing mandate, which Supreme Court precedent requires," he declared.What was the reaction?Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R), who led the lawsuit, celebrated the ruling. "Our system of checks & balances, federalism, separation of powers was meant to protect individual liberty. The belief in individual rights is one of America’s great legacies," he said. "Our win today vs. the Biden healthcare worker vaccine mandate is a win for workers & a win for liberty." CMS has not yet issued a statement. The agency, however, told Reuters it is reviewing the ruling and continued to claim that unvaccinated health care workers pose a threat to safety.
    (CBS/AP) — A federal judge on Monday blocked President Joe Biden’s administration from enforcing a coronavirus vaccine mandate on thousands of health care workers in 10 states, including New Hampshire, that had brought the first legal challenge against the requirement. The court order said that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had no clear authority from Congress to enact the vaccine mandate for providers participating in the two government health care programs for the elderly, disabled and poor. READ MORE: Local Researchers Test COVID Samples To Determine Prevalence Of Omicron Variant In Massachusetts“This is a big win for New Hampshire’s health care system,” New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu wrote on Twitter Monday. “Nursing homes were at risk of closure if the Biden mandate remained in place. This helps maintain the staff New Hampshire needs to care for our loved ones.” The preliminary injunction by St. Louis-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp applies to a coalition of suing states that, along with New Hampshire, includes Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. All those states...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — There’s a shortage of home health aides in our area, leaving local families desperate for care. The lack of caregivers gives parents of disabled children little to no options, and it’s putting senior citizens on long waitlists. KDKA investigator Meghan Schiller introduces us to one local family in the thick of the home health care crisis. READ MORE: State Police Selling Yard Signs To Help Fund Shop With A Cop Event In Westmoreland CountyIt’s all about routine for 22-year-old Matthew Kolat. After he hangs up his shirt, he carefully removes his shoes and darts off to the basement. He’s autistic, non-verbal and needs round-the-clock supervision from his mother, Maria. “He’s with me over 100 some hours a week and to constantly be prompting and redirecting, he’s lost so much from the shutdown,” said Maria Kolat said. He lost the regular routine of school, graduating at 21 from Sunrise Academy in Monroeville, and he recently lost all the home health aides that care for him Monday through Friday. “They’re not being lost because they can’t do the...
    WASHINGTON -- A federal judge on Monday blocked President Joe Biden's administration from enforcing a coronavirus vaccine mandate on thousands of health care workers in 10 states that had brought the first legal challenge against the requirement.The court order said that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had no clear authority from Congress to enact the vaccine mandate for providers participating in the two government health care programs for the elderly, disabled and poor.The preliminary injunction by St. Louis-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp applies to a coalition of suing states that includes Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. All those states have either a Republican attorney general or governor. Similar lawsuits also are pending in other states.The federal rule requires COVID-19 vaccinations for more than 17 million workers nationwide in about 76,000 health care facilities and home health care providers that get funding from the government health programs. Workers are to receive their first dose by Dec. 6 and their second shot by Jan. 4The court order against the health...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A federal judge, pointing to a new state law, is reconsidering Florida’s request for an injunction against the Biden administration’s health care shots mandate. But lawyers in Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody’s office and the Biden administration indicated they would rather fight it out at a federal appeals court. READ MORE: Holiday Celebrations In Broward This Week, Here's The Forecast For Spreading Holiday CheerThe legal wrangling came as the vaccination requirement for health-care workers is poised to take effect Dec. 6 – and after U.S. District Judge M. Casey Rodgers on Nov. 20 denied a motion by the state for a preliminary injunction or temporary restraining order against the requirement. The state last week took the case to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and requested that Rodgers issue an emergency injunction against the vaccination requirement while the Atlanta-based appellate court considers the issues. Rodgers on Saturday refused to issue the emergency injunction but said she would reconsider the state’s original request for a preliminary injunction. The reason: Florida lawmakers on Nov. 17 passed a bill...
    (CNN)A federal judge in Missouri issued an order Monday partially blocking the Biden administration from implementing a vaccine mandate for certain health care workers. The judge's order, which covers the 10 states that brought the case, played down the effectiveness of the vaccines and said that the "public would suffer little, if any, harm from maintaining the 'status quo' through the litigation of this case."The mandate came out of the US Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. It covers certain health care staff at providers that participate in Medicare and Medicaid, and set a December 6 deadline for those workers to have received the first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine.It will be blocked in Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming Vaccine inequity and hesitancy made the Omicron variant more likely, scientists sayUS District Judge Matthew Schelp, an appointee of President Donald Trump, said in a 32-page order that those challenging the mandate were likely to succeed in their arguments that CMS lacked the authority to...
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday blocked President Joe Biden’s administration from enforcing a coronavirus vaccine mandate on thousands of health care workers in 10 states that had brought the first legal challenge against the requirement. The court order said that the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid had no clear authority from Congress to enact the vaccine mandate for providers participating in the two government health care programs for the elderly, disabled and poor. The preliminary injunction by St. Louis-based U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp applies to a coalition of suing states that includes Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming. Similar lawsuits also are pending in other states. The federal rule requires COVID-19 vaccinations for more than 17 million workers nationwide in about 76,000 health care facilities and home health care providers that get funding from the government health programs. Workers are to receive their first dose by Dec. 6 and their second shot by Jan. 4 The court order against the health care...
              moreby J.D. Davidson   Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost kept pressure on the Biden administration this week by joining a lawsuit challenging the federal COVID-19 vaccination mandate for health care employees. Yost signed onto a federal lawsuit filed in Louisiana that wants the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ mandate declared illegal. Yost said the mandate affects about 17 million people across the country working full- and part-time jobs at hospitals, nursing facilities, hospices and home health agencies. “We have seen the challenges nursing homes and other facilities have had in retaining and recruiting staff,” Yost said. “This mandate, and the walkouts that will likely follow, will only make those challenges worse – leaving vulnerable Ohioans without adequate care.” The latest action was the third lawsuit Yost either filed or joined attacking different parts of President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate. The other two, one challenging the vaccination mandate for federal contractors and one challenging the requirement for a vaccine of private businesses with more than 100 employees, are in the U.S. Court of Appeals Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati. “It’s...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) – The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration has begun a process to revoke an assisted living home’s license in Lauderhill after a 69-year-old woman who went missing ended up dead in a car in the parking lot. Yvanne Moise left Victoria’s Retirement home on Sept. 18 and never returned, the South Florida SunSentinel reported. READ MORE: Miami Weather: Cooler And Drier Air Set To Move Into South FloridaThe state health care agency’s recent inspection said the facility lacked a plan required by state law to address Moise’s “severe or persistent mental condition.” And it did not have updated versions of those plans for seven of its 18 other residents who were also considered “limited mental health residents,” the newspaper reported. Moise didn’t sign out when she left the home on Sept. 18. The report said she repeatedly told a staff member she was going to leave, and by 8:30 that morning, she was nowhere to be found. The report said an employee watched her walk out the front gate and into the parking lot. Moise didn’t listen...
    In 2020, the holiday season preceded the worst COVID-19 surge the U.S. has faced since the pandemic began. Last year, the increase in daily virus cases began to accelerate in early December before peaking at more than 250,000 every day in early January. Now, Covid cases are rising once again in the U.S., with a seven-day rolling average of 95,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. This had led some experts to fear another winter surge is just around the corner.  Dr Richard Zane, the chief innovation officer at University of Colorado Health (UC Health), told DailyMail.com that because of the different circumstances of this year's wave when compared to last, hospitals may struggle to deal with the surge even more this time around. Some Colorado hospitals have already reached a breaking point, according to UC Health's Dr Richard Zane, and if things get worse the upcoming holiday surge could overwhelm the state's healthcare system One Chicago-base epidemiologist believes his state may have already put the worst of the pandemic behind them. Due to the high vaccination rate, combined...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — While many Minnesotans enjoy the comfort of family and friends this Thanksgiving, Dr. Jess Boland and nurse Mikayla Reimers are caring for people they barley know: sick patients inside our hospitals battling COVID and other critical illness and trauma. “It still hurts to try everything we can do for someone and have them get worse regardless of that,” said Boland, a critical care physician at Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids. READ MORE: 'There’s No One Here To Help Us': Staff Shortages Devastating Senior Living Facility ResidentsBoland is frank about the situation: It can feel demoralizing battling a pandemic that’s still persisting after 20 months. It’s stressful and challenging, she said, to establish boundaries between her personal and professional life. But working on Thanksgiving Day, she still finds so much to be grateful for — her supportive co-workers, her family and her baby. And moments of gratitude people have shown her during challenging times. “It’ll be a family that has really been struggling with the critical care process, and all of a sudden, somebody does something that’s...
    State Surgeon General nominee Joseph A. LadapoPhoto via @FLSurgeonGen/TwitterIn a nod to the ongoing tug-of-war over the COVID-19 pandemic, a Republican Florida state legislator wants to bar state regulators from going after doctors even if they tout medically questionable treatments or cures. Rep. Brad Drake, a Republican from Eucheenana, has filed “free speech” legislation that would require the state or its licensing boards to prove by clear and convincing evidence that a health care provider’s social media posts caused harm to a current patient before revoking — or threatening to revoke — a license, certificate, or registration of a health care practitioner. House Bill 687 allows the state to sanction doctors for social media posts that caused direct physical harm to current patients. But in order to prevail the state or licensing board must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the posts caused the harm. Florida Department of Health or its licensure boards could also be liable for up to $1.5 million to any doctor who suffers direct or indirect damages as a result of an unsuccessful regulatory effort. Some expressed concerns...
    WASHINGTON DC (WJZ) — The University of Maryland Medical System Telehealth Services is set to receive a nearly $800,00 grant to bolster its telehealth services, the Baltimore congressional delegation announced Wednesday. The grant, totaling $795,146, was announced by U.S. Senators Ben Cardin, Chris Van Hollen and Congressmen Dutch Ruppersberger, John Sarbanes and Kweisi Mfume. READ MORE: Boyfriend Charged With Murder In Baltimore County Woman's Shooting Death, Police SayThe funds will be used to purchase tablets and other software to help support remote patient monitoring. READ MORE: 'We're Good': Baltimore Ravens QB Lamar Jackson Says He's Over His Cold, For Real This TimeTelehealth services have been an important part of the modern medical system, proving essential during the COVID-19 pandemic. They are also a very popular option for those on a tighter budget and those in rural areas, says CDC. “The COVID-19 pandemic has made it clear that telehealth is an essential service,” the lawmakers said in a joint statement. “Expanding telehealth services will benefit everyone from patients to health care workers. We will continue to increase availability of safe and effective health care...
    Sign up here to get our updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. On Tuesdays, MinnPost provides weekly updates that cover COVID-19 developments in Minnesota from the previous Wednesday to present. This week in COVID-19 news Ahead of Thanksgiving weekend, state health leaders on Tuesday said Minnesota’s hospitals are dangerously full and urged people to get vaccinated, get booster shots and reduce behavior that puts them at high risk for catching COVID-19. Jennifer DeCubellis, the CEO of Hennepin Healthcare, told reporters that the “demand for emergency and life saving care has exceeded our capacity.”  “We need all Minnesotans right now to stand up, to stand together and to protect our limited and vital emergency resources the best we can so that no one in Minnesota is faced with a life-threatening need without optimal care and recovery supports immediately available,” DeCubellis said. Hennepin Healthcare, which runs HCMC in downtown Minneapolis, is the largest top-level trauma center for adults and kids in Minnesota and has unique expertise in emergency...
    (CNN)Employees of the Massachusetts hospital system Mass General Brigham have asked the Supreme Court to intervene in a lawsuit they've brought challenging their employer's Covid-19 vaccine mandate.The employees have struck out in their attempts to get a district court or the 1st US Circuit Court of Appeals to block the health care provider's mandate, which required employees to be vaccinated by November 5. The hospital system has declined to grant the employees who brought the lawsuit exemptions to the mandate despite, according to the filing, their sincerely held religious beliefs or medical concerns about getting vaccinated.Non-compliant employees have been terminated, the application filed with Justice Stephen Breyer on Tuesday said. Private SCOTUS files that could reveal what happened in Bush v. Gore remain locked up In the filing, the employees pointed to other employees who were granted exemptions by Mass General Brigham. They said that the hospital hadn't proven in the litigation that extending those exemptions to the wider group of unvaccinated employees would cause an undue burden on the health care provider."The fact that Respondent is already accommodating hundreds...
    SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CBS SF/BCN) — A local union announced Tuesday that hundreds of airport workers will protest the next day at San Francisco International Airport to highlight demands for affordable health care benefits, according to union officials. The protest is scheduled from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the airport’s Terminal 3 on what is typically one of the busiest travel days of the year and will include about 200 workers — some non-union and some members of the Unite Here Local 2 union — who are cashiers and food service employees in airport terminals as well as those who prepare food and drinks served on planes. READ MORE: UPDATE: Shaken Holiday Shoppers Changing Plans in Wake Of Retail Smash-and-Grab Crime SpreeIn a news release from Unite Here, claims include workers being denied affordable family health care in the face of increased risk of COVID-19 due to exposure to holiday travelers, and the union keeping workers on part-time status so they can’t qualify for health care coverage. READ MORE: Embattled District Attorney Chesa Boudin: 'We Want Everyone To Feel Safe'...
    Lidia Vilorio, a home health aide, with her patient Martina Negron. There are about 800,000 people, elderly and disabled, who qualify for subsidized home care on waiting lists to get that care. Some will end up in nursing homes, where they don’t need to be and where the threat of COVID-19 lingers indefinitely. President Joe Biden and the majority of congressional Democrats want to fix that. They originally proposed $400 billion over the next 10 years to provide home and community-based health services. That’s since been whittled down to $150 billion, one indication that it’s a huge sector of society that just doesn’t have the power of, say, a defense contractor to fight for itself. “We Don’t Fix This Because We Just Don’t Care About Old People,” Joanne Kenen, Commonwealth Fund journalist-in-residence at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, writes in a op-ed for Politico. As a society, we don’t care about old people. It’s not just old people, but also disabled people. People who aren’t infants who need help feeding, bathing, and clothing themselves don’t have value in this society. The ancillary point is that...
      ROME, GA., Nov. 22, 2021– Atrium Health Floyd plans to establish northwest Georgia’s first freestanding emergency department in Chattooga County, bringing a new level of 24/7 emergency care to residents of Summerville, Trion, Lyerly and surrounding communities. Working with the Chattooga County Commissioner’s office, and through discussion with state elected officials, Atrium Health Floyd identified the need to provide around-the-clock emergency care to these rural communities and on Monday, Nov. 22 submitted a Letter of Intent to apply for a Certificate of Need to build and operate the new freestanding emergency department in Chattooga County. “Access to necessary medical care in rural areas is an important state policy goal for Georgia, and this is an issue we have been in communication with the Governor’s office about,” said Kurt Stuenkel, President and CEO of Atrium Health Floyd. “Atrium Health Floyd will fulfill an unmet need for the Chattooga County area. Currently, patients can travel an hour or more in an emergency situation to get to an emergency department.  We will...
    LONG ISLAND (WABC) -- A dad on Long Island is sharing his story on the critical importance of getting the right doctors to check on your health - especially for those with serious conditions.Chris Frey has had heart problems all his life, and he knows the importance of checks all too well from experience."Last Thanksgiving, actually I wasn't feeling that great," Frey said.During Thanksgiving dinner, too much turkey or too much stuffing might lead to physical discomfort. But that's not what was going on with Frey and he ended up in the ER the day after."They said basically your heart is failing and the only way for you to get out of here is for you to get a new heart," Frey said.That's when the bottom fell out for the 39-year-old father of two who was born with a heart condition. He's managed it all his life, but still found himself in full congestive heart failure and was transferred to Mount Sinai for specialized care."My wife got a call at 6 or 6:30 in the morning that I coded," Frey...
    (CNN)A federal judge said this weekend that she would not block the Biden administration's vaccine mandate for health care workers while a Florida lawsuit challenging the mandate moves forward.In her decision declining Florida's request for preliminary order blocking the health care worker mandate, US District Judge Casey Rodgers said that Florida had not shown "that irreparable injury will occur " if the court did not block the mandate before it starts to take effect next month.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, has been a prominent opponent of President Joe Biden's efforts to mandate vaccines. The state is involved in other lawsuits challenging the Biden administration's mandate for federal contractors, as well as the vaccine rules issued by Occupational Safety and Health Administration. At DeSantis' urging, Florida's GOP-controlled legislature also passed last week bills that would impose fines on companies that require vaccines as a condition of employment."The affidavits in support of the motion include assertions of how the various agencies and institutions anticipate they may be adversely impacted by the mandate," the judge, a George W. Bush-appointee, wrote in an...
    People have trouble identifying the emotions of those who are wearing masks - but not when the face covering is see-through, a new study finds. A joint research team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital examined how the widespread use of masks affects the ability to non-verbally communicate. They compared the ability of the general population, health care workers and deaf people to identify a person's emotion through both a normal, opaque N95 mask, and a transparent mask. For each group, people were around four times more likely to identify an emotion correctly when the person was wearing a transparent mask. Researchers found that in all three study groups, general population (yellow), health care workers (blue) and hearing impaired health care workers (gray), around 80% of them were able to identify the correct emotion of the man wearing the mask if it was transparent. When the mask was opaque, they could only correctly identify his emotion 20% of the time Each participant in the surve was shown a video of a man smiling. In...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris will announce Monday that the Biden administration is investing $1.5 billion from the coronavirus aid package to address the health care worker shortage in underserved communities. The funding will go to the National Health Service Corps, Nurse Corps and Substance Use Disorder Treatment and Recovery programs, all federal programs that offer scholarship and loan repayments for health care students and workers if they pledge to work in underserved and high-risk communities. The money, which includes funds from the American Rescue Plan and other sources, will support more than 22,700 providers, marking the largest number of providers enrolled in these programs in history, according to the White House. It comes in response to recommendations laid out earlier this month by the White House’s COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force, which issued a report outlining how the administration could address systemic inequality in the health care system. The COVID-19 pandemic has both highlighted and exacerbated health care disparities for minority and underserved communities. According to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation, over the course of...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBEA federal judge has quickly rejected Florida’s request to block a Biden administration requirement that workers at hospitals, nursing homes and other health-care providers be vaccinated against COVID-19. U.S. District Judge M. Casey Rodgers issued an 11-page order Saturday denying a motion by Attorney General Ashley Moody for a preliminary injunction or temporary restraining order against the federal rule. Moody’s office filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the rule and sought an injunction or temporary restraining order before the vaccination requirement takes effect Dec. 6. Rodgers, however, wrote that Florida had not shown “irreparable harm” to justify an injunction or temporary restraining order. In part, the state contended that rule would affect state-run facilities, such as veterans’ nursing homes, and exacerbate health-care staffing shortages. “On review of the record, the court finds no adequate showing that irreparable injury will occur in the absence of a TRO (temporary restraining order) or preliminary injunction prior to December 6, 2021,” Rodgers wrote. “The affidavits (of state officials) in support of the motion include assertions of how the various agencies and institutions anticipate...
    Vice President Harris on Monday announced that the Biden administration would invest $1.5 billion from the coronavirus relief law into supporting the U.S. health care workforce with an eye toward underserved communities. The investment is designed to address the shortage of doctors, nurses and behavioral health providers in minority communities, rural areas and other underserved communities by providing additional funding for programs that address health workforce shortages. “These awards are supporting the National Health Service Corps, Nurse Corps, and Substance Use Disorder Treatment and Recovery programs,” the White House said in an announcement. “These programs address workforce shortages and health disparities by providing scholarship and loan repayment funding for health care students and professionals, in exchange for a service commitment in hard-hit and high-risk communities.” “Thanks to the American Rescue Plan, this funding will support over 22,700 providers—the largest field strength in history for these programs and a record number of skilled doctors, dentists, nurses, and behavioral health providers committed to working in underserved communities during a moment when we need them the most,” the announcement continued. The White House...
    A new law drafted by a Maryland congressman focuses on improving access to mental health services and privacy for the nation’s first responders who seek help. The federal Confidentiality Opportunities for Peer Support Counseling Act, or the COPS Counseling Act, was signed into law by President Joe Biden last week. More Local News More Government News It improves privacy standards for first responders and expands their overall access to mental health care. Democrat David Trone, who represents Maryland’s 6th Congressional District, created the legislation after Montgomery County Police Officer Thomas Bomba died by suicide in 2019. Trone highlighted the need to provide a safe space for those on the front lines, and his hope is that the act will also lead to better policing and safer communities. In a statement, Trone called it “a victory in the fight to end the stigma surrounding mental health.”
              more   In an 11-page order released on Saturday, U.S District Judge M. Casey Rodgers rejected Florida’s motion to block a Biden administration rule that requires workers at hospitals and other health-care related facilities be vaccinated against COVID. The decision was in response to a motion filed by Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody seeking a preliminary injunction against the federal rule which takes effect December 6. Moody’s argument contended that the requirement would increase health-care staffing shortages. However, Judge Rodgers concluded that Florida had shown “irreparable harm” to justify an injunction. Rodgers wrote in the order, “On review of the record, the court finds no adequate showing that irreparable injury will occur in the absence of a TRO (temporary restraining order) or preliminary injunction prior to December 6, 2021. The affidavits (of state officials) in support of the motion include assertions of how the various agencies and institutions anticipate they may be adversely impacted by the mandate. In particular, the affidavits express opinions of agency heads who ‘estimate’ that they ‘may’ lose a certain percentage or a number of employees,...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Ahead of the big holiday weekend COVID cases are surging in the region. In Minnesota alone new cases are up 53% over the last 14 days. Minnesota hospitalizations due to COVID are up nearly 40% over the last 14 days. There are concerns the Thanksgiving holiday could lead to an even greater surge and most hospitals are back to putting off elective surgeries. The increase in hospitalizations is coming not just from a rise in COVID patients but also non-COVID emergencies, as well as preventative health checks many patients have been putting off. For health care workers, exhaustion and burnout set in long ago. Emily Allen is a critical care nurse who has been caring for COVID patients since the pandemic began. She was a guest on WCCO Sunday Morning. “Our ICUS are completely full right now I’d say 70% of our patients are unfortunately unvaccinated but it’s not just the COVID patients, it’s all the ones that need surgical procedures and have life-threatening things going on. These COVID patients can stay in the ICU anywhere from...
    Democratic Assemblymember Ash Kalra is proposing a bill to jump-start the process, but Big Medicine will fight to kill it. By Mark Kreidler for Capital & Main The COVID-19 pandemic has brought all sorts of uncomfortable truths to the surface in California. Minority and lower-income communities, with families who live and work in conditions that produce worse health outcomes overall, have been ravaged by the virus. Testing and vaccination distribution efforts have been wildly uneven. While wholly ignorant of the science, the politicization of the COVID-19 vaccine and basic safety measures like masking have hindered even the most organized efforts to prevent the spread of disease. And for those who’ve long considered the state’s health care system broken, the pandemic’s march has reminded them why they’re working to change it. “I often say that the pandemic didn’t create the inequities we see, but it certainly exposed and exacerbated them,” said Democratic California state Assemblymember Ash Kalra. “A lot of people have woken up to the fact that our health care system is not only inequitable, but there are a lot of...
    TOKYO (AP) — Yoshihiko Takeuchi, who ran a small restaurant on the island of Okinawa, told only a few friends he had the coronavirus. When he didn’t answer phone calls from public health workers for three days, police went to his home and found him dead in his bed. He was among hundreds of people who have died while subject to “jitaku ryoyo,” or a policy of having some COVID-19 patients “recuperate at home.” In many countries, those with the virus stay home to isolate and recover, but critics say that in Japan, a country with one of the most affordable and accessible health care systems, people have been denied hospital care, and the policy amounted to “jitaku hochi,” or “abandonment at home.” Takeuchi’s sister and a daughter of another man who died at home of COVID-19 have started an online support group for grieving relatives of such victims. Japan has seen caseloads fall dramatically in the past two months and the government has drawn up a road map to improve its pandemic response. A plan adopted...
    BOSTON (CBS) – It’s a scramble never experienced at such levels before. “I spend every day trying to find beds for patients,” said Dr. Richard Nesto, Chief Medical Officer for Beth Israel Lahey Health. An overloaded system struggling to care for every patient that needs it. Unlike a year ago, it’s not the pandemic that is causing the surge. READ MORE: Framingham Man Crashes Into Westboro Police Cruiser, Charged With OUI“Patients did defer care for a variety of reasons, either they couldn’t get in to see healthcare providers or they were afraid to,” said Katie Murphy an ICU nurse with the Massachusetts Nurses Association. She says patients are coming in sicker as a result. Dr. Nesto calls it the perfect storm of patients admitted longer, trouble finding rehab space for discharge, and staffing shortages. “Every aspect of patient care in the chain right now is not functioning where it should be because of these factors,” Nesto said. According to the state Department of Public Health, this week alone, of the 10,386 hospital beds in the state,...
    Karin Johnson’s mother Dorothy, 86, often comes home singing from Martin Luther Adult Day Center in Bloomington. Dorothy, who has dementia, spends weekdays at the center in a program for seniors with memory problems or physical disabilities. It provides food, interaction, medication management and entertainment — all while giving participants’ caregivers a much-needed break. “She gets things there that she doesn’t get when she is just sitting around at my house,” Johnson said of the Martin Luther program. “My mom’s physically healthy but she lives in her own little world. She often doesn’t even know me most of the time — but she’ll come home and she’ll be singing songs like, ‘Let Me Call You Sweetheart.’ It makes her happy. She’ll even sing to the dog.” Modeled after a system designed to help elderly people stay out of residential care, the Martin Luther Adult Day Center provides as many services as possible so that participants and their families can limit the number of places they have to travel.  Johnson said that even though caring for her mother can be hard work,...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Nurses and mental health clinicians in Northern California walked out today in solidarity of the engineers union who have yet to reach an agreement with Kaiser. This disruption had a significant impact on patient care here in the Bay Area.RELATED: Hundreds of striking Kaiser engineers rally in the streets of OaklandEarly Friday morning, Kaiser union workers rallied in Oakland for a second day in a row. Today nurses joined the walkout to show their support for engineers who have been on strike since their contract expired in September."We thought we were making headway. We thought we were going to get a fair deal, just market value based on what other engineers make in the Bay Area," said Mark Sutherland, a Kaiser engineer.Kaiser argues that between their salaries and benefits, their engineers are among the best compensated in their profession.Robin Watkins, a nurse at Kaiser, said his job is getting harder without the engineers."They should be back in the building doing what they do fixing the equipment, helping us take care of our patients. We can't do...
    New York (CNN Business)CVS' announcement Thursday that it will close 900 stores over the next three years — around 10% of its pharmacies — may have caught some shoppers off guard.Isn't CVS doing really well right now? Haven't lots of people gone to drug stores during the pandemic to stock up on hand sanitizer, cleaning wipes and toilet paper? What about all those Covid-19 vaccine shots CVS gives out?How to find lower prices and avoid empty shelves during the holiday shopping rushActually, CVS' closures shouldn't come as a surprise. They are the latest moves in the long-running contraction of the US retail pharmacy sector. CVS (CVS), Walgreens (WBA) and Rite Aid (RAD) have been shuttering stores for years, while independent pharmacies have come under pressure from chains. Drug store closures can hurt local communities, creating access gaps for medications and essentials.CVS, the largest drug store chain in the United States, pointed to "changes in population, consumer buying patterns and future health needs" as factors in its decision to close stores. Here's why CVS will close 900 stores.Read MorePivot to health...
    Days after Kaiser reached an agreement with its pharmacists to avoid a strike earlier this week, the health care giant is bracing for thousands of workers to walk off the job at its Northern California medical centers on Thursday and Friday. Unions representing Kaiser nurses, mental health professionals and others say their members are prepared to strike in sympathy with Kaiser engineers, who have been picketing for better compensation for roughly two months. Around 40,000 members of three unions representing X-ray technicians, optometrists, phlebotomists, housekeepers and other employees are set to strike for a day if Kaiser and Local 39, which represents hundreds of engineers charged with keeping the health care provider’s buildings running smoothly, don’t reach an agreement by early Thursday morning. “We are sympathy striking because Kaiser has lost its way and is putting its drive for profits over people, hurting our patients and union co-workers,” said Ethan Ruskin, a health educator at Kaiser San Jose and a member of the SEIU-UHW, which is striking. “The Local 39 engineers play a critical role in maintaining our facilities and...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBEFlorida lawmakers sped Tuesday toward passing a plan to prevent COVID-19 vaccination requirements and rejected an attempt to exclude hospitals, nursing homes and other health-care providers from the measure. The House, during the second day of a special legislative session called by Gov. Ron DeSantis, took up the plan and is poised to pass it Wednesday. The plan also cleared the Senate Appropriations Committee, preparing it to go to the full Senate on Wednesday. The House and Senate are considering identical bills (HB 1B and SB 2-B) to prevent vaccination requirements, with Republicans rejecting Democratic attempts to make changes. That included the House on Tuesday rejecting a proposed amendment to carve out hospitals, nursing homes and other health-care providers that take part in the Medicaid and Medicare programs. The state plan conflicts with a rule issued this month by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services that seeks to require health-care workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19. If health-care providers do not comply with federal rule, they would face financial penalties. Rep. Carlos Guillermo Smith, D-Orlando, said...
              more   Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and Attorney General Chris Carr on Tuesday announced the state has filed a lawsuit challenging the Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers. Kemp and Carr announced this in an emailed press release. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued the emergency regulation this month. The regulation mandates full COVID-19 vaccination for all eligible staff at health care facilities that participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs by January 4, 2022. Kemp said in the press release that President Joe Biden’s mandate “will only worsen worker shortages in a critical-need area.” Carr, meanwhile, said in the press release that Biden is acting recklessly. “With this latest unconstitutional mandate, the Biden administration is targeting a health care community that is already reeling from the impacts of a global health pandemic,” Carr said. “Georgia health care providers, particularly those located in our rural areas, cannot afford to lose workers or lessen care services due to the unlawful actions of the federal government. We will continue to stand up for the rule of law and...
    Governor Brian P. Kemp and Attorney General Chris Carr today announced the State of Georgia has filed a lawsuit challenging the Biden administration’s vaccine mandate for health care workers. The emergency regulation, issued on Nov. 5, 2021 by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), mandates full COVID-19 vaccination for all eligible staff at health care facilities that participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs by Jan. 4, 2022. “After healthcare heroes went above and beyond the call of duty to keep Americans safe and healthy throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Joe Biden is now threatening their livelihood if they refuse COVID-19 vaccination,” said Governor Kemp. “Yet another unlawful mandate from this administration will only worsen worker shortages in a critical-need area as we continue to balance the everyday healthcare needs of hardworking Georgians and fighting COVID-19. We will continue to fight this repeated, unconstitutional overreach by Joe Biden and his administration in court.” “President Biden’s reckless ‘one-size-fits-most’ approach to governing continues to create immense disruption and uncertainty for Georgia...
    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A second set of states has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health care workers. The latest suit, dated Monday, was filed in Louisiana on behalf of 12 states and comes less than a week after another lawsuit challenging the rule was filed in Missouri by a coalition of 10 states. “The federal government will not impose medical tyranny on Louisiana’s people without my best fight,” Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry said in a news release announcing the lawsuit. Both lawsuits say the vaccine mandate threatens to drive away health care workers who refuse to get vaccinated at a time when such workers are badly needed. They also contend the rule issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services violates federal law and unconstitutionally encroaches on powers reserved to the states. The Louisiana lawsuit quotes from Friday’s order by the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals blocking a broader Biden administration vaccine mandate that businesses with more than 100 workers require employees to be vaccinated by...
    (CNN) — In the search for workers in this tight labor market, companies have courted new hires with the promise of higher wages, sign-on bonuses, ample vacation time, and childcare. The latest: “No vaccine required.” That three-word phrase is popping up across online job listings (sometimes emphatically in all caps and accompanied by exclamation marks) as businesses seek to turn the federal government’s proposed vaccine decree on its head and attract employees — notably those from a talent pool that’s been turned off by or turned away from employers that require a Covid-19 vaccination. Under the series of federal regulations, which have met some legal challenges that could delay or stop their implementation, private businesses with more than 100 employees, certain health care workers and federal contractors will be required to be fully vaccinated or, in some cases, undergo regular testing for the Covid-19 virus. And although the reasons behind the “no vaccine required” job listings vary by business — for some owners, it’s philosophical; for others, it’s desperation amid an unbalanced labor market — several employers say it’s working....