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    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) — While global supply chain issues are reportedly easing, Florida farmers told lawmakers Thursday that perishable items with short shelf lives continue to struggle in being moved from fields to markets. During a meeting of the Senate Agriculture Committee, growers said the industry faces transportation and labor shortages in getting products out of the ground and to market. They also face increased prices and delays for materials — such as seeds, fertilizers and chemicals — needed to grow crops. READ MORE: Arrest Made After Social Media Threat Targets Marjory Stoneman Douglas High“There’s got to be some type of prioritization that can happen in the supply chain,” said Tori Rumenik, commodity services and supply chain manager for the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association. “I’m just going to lay it bare. I think that getting ag inputs to producers and food to consumers is more important than moving televisions and Christmas gifts. That’s just my opinion. But we’re all in competition for the same drivers and trucks.” Rumenik said what used to take two days to move products is now...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- After a weekend like we just had in the Bay Area, the immediate question for some is: will we see more mass organized crime?Silicon Valley Central Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Christian Malesic has his own question."What can we do about that? That is a very difficult one," Malesic said. "You not only need a security presence, and that can be electronic of some sort whether that be cameras or scanners and that kind of thing, but it also needs to be good guys like security or police."WATCH: Videos show scope of Bay Area's weekend of organized retail robberies EMBED More News Videos Organized theft spree: Bay Area high-end retail stores hit with spate of robberies over weekend (1 of 5) Union Square looks welcoming and festive Monday morning but there is still evidence that weekend looting spree happened here. San Jose police said it's up to individual retailers whether they beef up their own security.The Apple Store was a continuous target for robberies for quite some time until they made changes like...
    WALNUT CREEK (KPIX) — City leaders and shoppers said Sunday they are worried about the growing trend of mass robberies around the Bay Area as police look for the majority of the 80 or so suspects responsible for looting a Walnut Creek Nordstrom store on Saturday. “I hope this doesn’t happen because this is not safe for the community and all of us want to be in a safer neighborhood,” said Mohini Soodan, a regular customer at the store. “We have family around.” Police also alerted businesses and residents that looters who targeted a Nordstrom store Saturday may be planning more thefts on Sunday evening. The police department “is actively monitoring intelligence that indicates the group of thieves who stole from the Broadway Plaza Nordstrom last night are considering similar activity later today,” Walnut Creek police said in a community advisory posted about 3:30 p.m. Sunday on social media. “This has not been confirmed, but out of an abundance of caution, we’re alerting businesses and residents to be prepared,” police said in the advisory. The department is calling in additional...
    (CNN)With hospitals throughout Colorado facing increases in Covid-19 hospitalizations, state officials announced that attendees of large public indoor events in certain jurisdictions must be vaccinated in order to help curb the virus' spread. Gatherings of more than 500 people in parts of metro Denver will require attendees to provide proof of vaccination, according to an amended public health order released Sunday, with exceptions provided to places of worship. Colorado is one of several Mountain West states hit hard by a coronavirus surge this fall, driven by the highly transmissible Delta variant as more than 150,000 Americans have died of Covid-19 since June. The state also reactivated its crisis standards of care last week for staffing of health care systems, allowing for greater flexibility for hospitals to shift personnel and resources to handle the latest wave of Covid-19 patients.Seven states -- all west of the Mississippi River -- have at least 30% of ICU beds filled with Covid-19 patients, according to Sunday data from the US Department of Health and Human Services. Montana leads the nation at around 44%, followed by...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- With Thanksgiving just two weeks away, activity is ramping up at the Alameda County Community Food Bank, in a year when not only a pandemic, but also rising inflation and supply chain interruptions present considerable challenges.RELATED: Bay Area businesses brace for holidays during global supply chain nightmare"We're actually able to get it, but it does cost a lot more than it was previously," said Regi Young, Executive Director at the Alameda County Community Food Bank in Oakland. "Generally, we're seeing one in four people in Alameda County are at-risk of needing our services. So what we're just having to be doing is be really strategic about the way we're sourcing food items."In just one month, the food bank's cost for seven core items rose $60,000.VIDEO: Smaller birds, popular Thanksgiving sides could be harder to find in 2021EMBED More News Videos With the countdown to Thanksgiving underway, companies are warning that some turkeys and all those trimmings may be harder to find this year. The price for one item alone, oatmeal, has jumped 18 percent.And then there...
    LAKEWOOD, Colo. (CBS4) – With prices for food going up, groups which provide groceries for those in need are being caught in need as well. One example is the Action Center on 14th Avenue in Lakewood. They come by car, on foot, or send someone here for them, all in need of food. Some like Danielle Micheletti. READ MORE: Staffing Shortages Forces 3 Denver Schools To Switch To Remote Learning (credit: CBS) “We were doing alright and then the pandemic hit, and everybody needed a little extra help,” she said while picking up boxes of groceries which were put into her car by volunteers. Micheletti and her husband work, but with two children it’s hard to put food on the table. Now, it’s also become difficult for those who distribute the badly-needed groceries like Food Bank of the Rockies. (credit: CBS) “Our challenge is it is costing us more money than we imagined and more money than we ever spent on food before,” Food Bank of the Rockies CEO Erin Pulling told CBS4. She says eggs are...
    Consumer borrowing accelerated by far more than expected in September, as American households dealt with rising prices by swiping their credit cards and taking out more loans. Total consumer credit increased $29 billion, up from a $13.8 billion gain in August, according to data released by the Federal Reserve Friday. Economists had been expecting a $15.5 billion gain, according to Econoday. That’s a monthly gain of 0.7 percent, well above the decade average of 0.4 percent. Compared with a year ago, consumer debt is up 4.9 percent. Consumer prices rose 0.4 percent in September and were up 5.4 percent compared with the prior September. The gain in September translates into an annual growth rate of 8.3 percent in September, a big pick up from the 3.8 percent pace in August. Revolving credit, which is mostly credit cards, rose 11.8 percent, which follows a 3.4 percent gain in August. Expansions in revolving credit can be an indicator of economic confidence and can help an economy grow. But they can also be a signal of economic distress if cash-strapped households are turning...
    ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — St. Paul Public Schools says it might close LEAP High School and four elementary schools because of low enrollment. From a refugee camp in Thailand to a student in St. Paul, 18-year-old Naing Aung has finally found his refuge in LEAP High School. READ MORE: Ivan Contreras-Sanchez Charged With Murder In Beating Death Of Man Found In Farm Ditch“We came from same refugee, so we understand each other,” Aung said. “We can’t speak English that well.” Students at the school have a special bond because LEAP specifically serves learners that are new to the country. “LEAP High School is the perfect place for immigrants to have a good environment while learning culture, language and assignments,” said Israel Toledo, a sophomore. Declining enrollment could cause the school to close. LEAP went from about 360 enrolled students in 2011 to a current enrollment of about 140 students. The St. Paul Board of Education recommends shutting down LEAP and four elementary schools including Highwood Hills, John A. Johnson, Jackson, and Wellstone. It’s part of a plan called Envision...
    President Joe Biden and the Democratic Party may have fallen into a complacency trap set, in part, by polling and arrogance that led to shock results in gubernatorial elections in New Jersey and Virginia. Biden now has to grapple with what the results mean for his stuck-in-Congress legislative priorities and how he will lead his party through what is expected to be a tough midterm cycle. BIDEN'S WELCOME HOME GIFT: A LEGISLATIVE AGENDA A Senate Democratic aide disagreed the party had rested on its laurels or had overestimated goodwill toward it following Virginia gubernatorial nominee Terry McAuliffe's loss and a surprisingly close race for New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy. The reason McAuliffe lost to Glenn Youngkin was that the one-time governor and Democratic National Committee chairman ditched his primary contest strategy of promoting his economic and education accomplishments, nationalizing the general by focusing on former President Donald Trump, the aide told the Washington Examiner. "The blame isn’t on Congress necessarily, but it’s on Democrats who don’t know how to run on a vision and on a disciplined messaging campaign,"...
    CALUMET, Mich. (AP) — Some of Michigan’s smallest towns are seeing ripples from short-term lodging popularized by Airbnb and other websites. Calumet is on the Keweenaw Peninsula in the far north of the Upper Peninsula. Short-term rentals came up at a recent meeting of the village council. READ MORE: Planet Fitness Gives Cardio Equipment To Detroit Firehouses Aerial View of the City of Calumet with St Paul the Apostle Catholic Church in the Foreground (Jeremy Woodhouse/Getty Images) The chairwoman of the planning commission, Colleen Kobe, said the rentals are not a permitted use under Calumet’s zoning law, The Daily Mining Gazette reported. “Those really shouldn’t be happening there,” Kobe said of short-term rentals in downtown apartments. READ MORE: Duggan Seeks 3rd Term As Detroit Mayor Against Lawyer AdamsAnd even if the ordinance is changed, Airbnb-style rentals could reduce long-term rentals and cause a population loss, Kobe said. “The other thing, which might not be all that popular,” said Kobe, “is we could start taxing. That’s what other communities do, the city of Chicago started doing that because it’s just like...
    Three Los Angeles Lakers were involved in two separate incidents at the Staples Center on Friday night during their 10-point loss to the Phoenix Suns in their second game of the 2021-22 regular season. Anthony Davis, Dwight Howard and Rajon Rondo were all involved in altercations while the game was going on. The incident between Davis and Howard happened during a timeout in the first half, while Rondo got involved with a courtside fan later in the game. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Oct 22, 2021; Los Angeles, California, USA; Los Angeles Lakers forward Anthony Davis (3) and Phoenix Suns guard Cameron Payne (15) battle for the ball in the first half at Staples Center. (Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports) The Lakers lost 115-105, but the incidents drew the most attention after the game. Video from the ESPN broadcast showed Davis forcing Howard back down onto his chair as he tried to get back up. Davis had to be pulled away from Howard by teammates. The two continued to argue after an assistant coach stepped in between...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks outside of the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 20, 2021.Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images As Democrats wrestle over their spending package, key lawmakers are still fighting to change the $10,000 cap on the federal deduction for state and local taxes. The measure, known as SALT, is a priority among lawmakers in high-tax states, such as New York, New Jersey and California, jeopardizing the Democrats' multitrillion-dollar plan. The budget can pass without Republican support. However, Democrats need votes from nearly every member of the House and all Democratic senators. Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., who met with President Joe Biden and other party centrists on Tuesday, said he emphasized the importance of restoring the write-off, among other priorities, for families in his district.    More from Personal Finance:Inflation is here for now. How top financial advisors are handling itProposed elimination of Roth conversions for wealthy wouldn't start till 2032First bitcoin futures ETF starts trading. What to know before investing "I'm working around-the-clock with my colleagues in the House and Senate to reinstate SALT," he said. "I'm...
    (CNN)Forced to pare down their bill to expand the social safety net, Democrats are now having to make tough calls on what they can cut from the proposal, prompting fresh concerns from members who had been working for years on provisions that once had been included in President Joe Biden's Build Back Better agenda and now may be on the chopping block.Democratic leaders face the challenge of shrinking a once $3.5 trillion bill closer to the President's recently discussed $1.75 to $1.9 trillion price tag -- and find a way to pay for it -- at a time when each member of their party holds considerable influence as leadership will need almost every vote to move Biden's agenda over the finish line.With nothing yet fully decided, some Democrats are trying to boost provisions that may be reduced or knocked out of the final bill entirely -- and, at times, are letting their displeasure spill into public view -- as members of the party receive more information about what cuts could be coming.During a meeting with House progressives on Tuesday, Biden...
    The school board for Springfield District 186 has moved forward with possible discipline against two teachers who have not complied with COVID-19 vaccine or testing mandates. The teachers, Kadence Koen and Kingsley Keys, say their conscience won’t allow them to comply. Fellow teacher Kimberly Smoot is complying with the testing, but told the school board Monday she won’t take the vaccine. She worried about a slippery slope. “First we must test, then you take away the option to test and make us get the vaccine,” Smoot said. “Next, that’s not enough and we must get a booster according to your schedule. When we give up our rights, even if it's little by little, we will never get them back.” Springfield school teacher Sara Combs stood in support of teachers not complying. She said testing requirements are discriminatory and arbitrary because even vaccinated people can spread the virus. Combs said the governor’s mandate is not law “as it has not been through legislative process.” “And even a state law is unconstitutional if it violates rights protected by federal law,” Combs said....
    DOUGLAS COUNTY, Colo. – This is the first in a two-part series on school board politics in Denver suburbs. Douglas County, Colorado, parents told Fox News that school board politics forced them to mobilize for the future of their children’s education.  "I think with the pandemic, we were stuck at home with our kids, we had to get more involved in our education, listening to Zoom calls, classes, things like that," said Christa Gilstrap, one of the parents. "Parents started realizing, ‘Wait, what is happening?'" "It doesn't really matter who the president is, so much for my day-to-day life, but it really matters who my school board, who my governor is," she continued. Debates around school board politics in places like Loudoun County, Virginia, have dominated the national conversation, but they are similarly playing out in other communities all across the country, including in Douglas County.  SAN DIEGO-AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT MAY BAN CRITICAL RACE THEORY The Douglas County school board unanimously passed an equity policy in March, which the district said "will ensure every DCSD student and staff member has...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The chaos on the streets of New York City continues. Over the weekend there was more teen gun violence and a tragic death of a nurse after she was pushed onto the ground in Times Square, police say, by a mentally ill homeless person. On Monday, CBS2’s Marcia Kramer demanded answers from elected officials at the Columbus Day Parade, and has more on what they said they will do to combat the problem. READ MORE: Inquiry To Be Launched Into Newburgh Schools Following Starvation Death Of 7-Year-Old Peter CuacuasIt seems that there are no easy answers to the perception that city streets are frequently unsafe, but a number of politicians either running for office or trying to hold on to their current jobs offered suggestions for changing the dynamic. And when it comes to the blame game, well, Mayor Bill de Blasio is squarely in the crosshairs. “We have precipitously dropped so quick in terms of the loss of quality of life and violent crime,” Republican mayoral candidate Curtis Sliwa said. Sliwa said there’s no doubt...
    Magali Sanchez-Hall, a Wilmington resident for over two decades, has struggled with asthma her entire life. She says the health issue stems from her proximity to oil and gas drilling.Emma Newburger | CNBC LOS ANGELES, CALIF. — Stepping out of a coffee shop near Interstate 110 in the Wilmington neighborhood of Los Angeles, you're immediately hit by a foul odor. Magali Sanchez-Hall, 51, who's lived here for more than two decades, is used to the smell of rotting eggs wafting from the hundreds of oil wells operating in the neighborhood. She's used to her neighbors describing chronic coughs, skin rashes and cancer diagnoses, and to the asthma that affects her own family, who live only 1,500 feet from a refinery. "When people are getting sick with cancer or having asthma, they might think it's normal or blame genetics," she said. "We don't often look at the environment we're in and think — the chemicals we're breathing are the cause." Wilmington, a predominantly working-class and Latino immigrant community of more than 50,000 people, has some of the highest rates of asthma...
    Thomas Barwick | DigitalVision | Getty Images The financial advisory industry continues to struggle with efforts to boost diversity, though more firms seem to be emphasizing the issue in their recent recruiting, according to top firms on CNBC's annual FA 100 ranking.    The profession has long been one dominated by white men. For example, Black and Hispanic certified financial planners represented just 4% of the 87,784 total CFPs in 2019 — despite being nearly 30% of the U.S. population, according to a CFP Board report published last year. Women have made up about 23% of CFPs for a decade, despite accounting for more than half the U.S. population, according to a 2019 report. While financial planners are just a subset of the overall spectrum of "financial advice," their stats are in line with those of the broader industry.    More from FA 100:Meet the financial advisor ranked No. 1 by CNBCHow the pandemic has changed the financial advice businessHere's how top financial advisors are hiring young talent "Our industry has a lot of the same problems our society has,"...
    NEW HYDE PARK, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Three of the nation’s first COVID-19 vaccine recipients got booster shots on Wednesday. They are front-line workers and, therefore, eligible for the third dose of the Pfizer vaccine. READ MORE: Judge Denies Temporary Restraining Order Against COVID Vaccine Mandate At NYC SchoolsBut as CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff reported, the heath care community still has a number of holdouts for their first shots. They were all smiles under masks, as doctors and nurses received their third shots, COVID boosters, which are now recommended for health care workers and other front-line occupations. “We believe a fully vaccinated workforce and community is the way to get out of this pandemic,” said Dr. David Battinelli, Northwell Health‘s chief medical officer. FLASHBACK: Students Send Letters Of Appreciation To ICU Nurse Sandra Lindsay, Who Was First In US To Receive COVID Vaccine Among them was LIJ ICU nurse Sandra Lindsay, who was the first American to receive the COVID-19 vaccine back in December. Now, she’s spreading the word that boosters are safe and effective in fighting the deadly virus. “I am...
    Share this: Rodney Lee began looking for alternatives to in-person instruction for his daughter as soon as it became clear that New York City would not offer a remote option for families this year. Ten-year-old Priya suffers from a seizure disorder that could be exacerbated if she contracts the coronavirus. Lee learned that his daughter would be an excellent candidate for “medically necessary instruction,” a revamped education department-run program that allows students to learn from home if they have health needs, including seizure disorders, that prevent them from safely returning to classrooms this school year. But the family soon learned that the program would only offer an hour a day of instruction, far less than what Priya received last school year when she opted for fully remote learning.
    BEIJING (AP) — Global shoppers face possible shortages of smartphones and other goods ahead of Christmas after power cuts to meet government energy use targets forced Chinese factories to shut down and left some households in the dark. In the northeastern city of Liaoyang, 23 people were hospitalized with gas poisoning after ventilation in a metal casting factory was shut off following a power outage, according to state broadcaster CCTV. No deaths were reported. A components supplier for Apple Inc.’s iPhones said it suspended production at a factory west of Shanghai under orders from local authorities. The disruption to China’s vast manufacturing industries during one of their busiest seasons reflects the ruling Communist Party’s struggle to balance economic growth with efforts to rein in pollution and emissions of climate-changing gases. “Beijing’s unprecedented resolve in enforcing energy consumption limits could result in long-term benefits, but the short-term economic costs are substantial,” Nomura economists Ting Lu, Lisheng Wang and Jing Wang said in a report Monday. They cut their economic growth forecast for China to 4.7% from 5.1% over a...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Companies around the country are still trying to decide how to implement President Joe Biden’s sweeping new vaccine mandates. On Thursday, the president outlined who he now wants to be vaccinated. Locally, some private companies already require all employees to be vaccinated, while others are trying to figure out what to do next. READ MORE: Fourth Stimulus Check: Is Another Relief Payment Coming In 2021? “The Department of Labor is developing an emergency rule to require all employers with 100 or more employees that together employ over 80 million workers to ensure their workforces are fully vaccinated or show a negative test at least once a week,” said Biden. With that announcement, companies are back at the drawing board trying to figure out how a vaccine requirement will affect them. READ MORE: 40 Chalk Portraits At Flight 93 National Memorial Bring Back Memories For Those Who Lost Loved Ones Giant Eagle says no decisions have been made yet, and school districts across the area are still waiting on guidance. North Allegheny says: “We, like other employers, are...
    LONDON (AP) — Britain’s interior minister was meeting her French counterpart on Wednesday amid a surge in the number of people making risky journeys across the English Channel in small boats. Thousands of migrants have landed on beaches in southeast England in recent days of calm, summery weather, with 785 arriving on Monday alone, according to Britain’s Home Office. More than 12,000 have made the crossing this year, according to a count by Britain’s Press Association news agency. In 2020, about 8,500 people made the journey, and several died in the attempt. Migrants have long used northern France as a launching point to reach Britain, either by stowing away in trucks or on ferries, or — increasingly since the coronavirus pandemic disrupted international travel — in dinghies and other small boats organized by people smugglers. The British and French governments have worked for years to stop the journeys, without much success. Earlier this year, Britain agreed to give France 54 million pounds ($74 million, 63 million euros) to help fund a doubling of the number of police patrolling French...
                        Danville Public Schools moved its middle and high school classes to virtual on Friday with about 1,100 out of the district’s total 6,900 students quarantined for COVID-19. The school is using the Labor Day weekend to do a deep-clean. Director of Curriculum and Instruction Brenda Muse said most of those cases were among middle and high school students. “Those levels have been increasing, and so in consultation with our State Superintendent Dr. Lane and with our local health department we asked for some advice on what they felt we needed to do. And our health department said a deep cleaning would greatly assist at the secondary level,” Muse said. Nearby Franklin County also had middle and high-school students attend classes virtually on Friday, with a plan to return in-person Tuesday. “After considering the current situation and consulting with [the Virginia Department of Health], the decision was made to go to virtual learning on Friday, Sept. 3 at Benjamin Franklin Middle School, Gereau Center, and Franklin County High School...
    Not sure how you come to the conclusion that masks don't work but livestock dewormer does, but I suspect the answer is 'Facebook' In the news today: It may be a mostly-quiet holiday weekend, but there's no respite from the times in which we live. As schools grapple with our children's safety and essential workers grapple with their own safety, during a pandemic(!), there are no shortage of Americans to threaten violence against them and anyone else who might take a emergent deadly disease more seriously than the conspiracy-minded would prefer they do. Anyone looking for optimism about the future of the human race might want to just curl up with a good book for a while. But here's some of what you may have missed: • Nun and advocate slams Remain in Mexico policy, saying all she saw 'was a lot of human suffering' • BIPOC workers grapple with public anger over masks • After school orders quarantine, a father and his friends threaten principal, zip ties in hand • Listen: Sperm whales’ echolocation sounds are much more than...
    A woman wears a face mask as she buys food at a coffee shop at Penn Station in New York on Aug. 2, 2021. by Brenton Weyi This story was originally published at Prism. Since the onset of the pandemic, front-line workers nationwide have contended with abuse from mask-resistant customers for enforcing mask rules in their places of work. For Black, Indigenous, and other workers of color, this has meant facing additional risks to their safety as COVID-19 continues to disproportionately damage their communities. And now that mask requirements are returning to combat rising infection and hospitalization rates, BIPOC front-line workers are worried about dealing with increasingly hostile customers. “I’ve had several people actually try to fight me,” said Keanu, an AAPI security professional who moonlights working the doors at clubs in Colorado. “You try to keep positive customer service in mind, but some people just don't want to hear it. I hear everything from ‘COVID is a hoax’ to ‘masks don't work’ to ‘this is just stupid.’” Some workers have been attacked or even killed for trying to...
    As the school year gets underway, signs that read “school bus drivers wanted” are a familiar sight throughout Illinois. The nationwide driver shortage is being felt in the Land of Lincoln. Numerous districts are forced to tier bus schedules, with buses making multiple rounds to prevent overcrowding. “Due to the driver shortage, we had to change from two-tier schedule to three-tier schedule to use drivers on multiple routes,” Peoria Superintendent of Schools Sharon Desmoulin-Kherat said. Parents in the Granite City area are being asked to find their children other means of transportation to school because of the driver shortage. This week, the district is providing bus transportation only for students in kindergarten through 4th grades, according to a letter on the district's website. All 5th through 12th grade students without a ride to school will be granted an excused absence and will be allowed to make up any work. School officials are turning to mass transit for help. The district announced Madison County Transit will offer free bus rides to students through the end of...
                        Chesterfield County Public Schools (CCPS) announced a starting pay increase from $17.21 to $20.21 per hour to attract bus drivers amid a national bus driver shortage. That combines with an already-in place $3,000 bonus, and was made possible by additional funding from Chesterfield County, the school and the county announced Monday. “A national school bus driver shortage has led to transportation challenges at the start of the 2021-22 school year. Chesterfield school bus drivers are working long hours and driving multiple routes to get students to and from school, but dozens of school buses are sitting idle because of a lack of drivers,” a CCPS press release said. Districts across Virginia are battling a driver shortage, part of a national trend that existed before the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey released Tuesday by several school transportation organizations found that of 1,500 respondents across the country, 65 percent said the bus driver shortage is their number one problem or concern, and 51 percent said the shortage was severe or desperate....
    Share this: This article was originally published on Sep 1 at 9:47am EDT by THE CITY   Before the pandemic, 60,000 people a day came to Hudson Square in Lower Manhattan. Despite the recovery from the COVID shutdown, now only about 15,000 people show up most weekdays.
    In this article YUM CMG MCD VIDEO2:0202:02Restaurants weigh vaccine mandates in tight labor marketSquawk BoxTo mandate, or not to mandate? That's the question facing down restaurant owners and operators during one of the most challenging hiring environments in decades. The Food and Drug Administration approved Pfizer and BioNTech's Covid-19 vaccine on Monday, opening the door for workplaces to opt to require workers to have the shot. But between enhanced unemployment benefits, hesitancy surrounding Covid, child-care hurdles and more, the industry is already facing a shortage of available workers and adding a vaccine mandate to the picture could cut both ways. Big players in the industry have mostly remained silent on vaccine mandates for restaurant staff. McDonald's recently pushed back its return-to-office date to Oct. 11 and said it will require its U.S. corporate workforce to be fully vaccinated by Sept. 27, with exemptions for religious or medical reasons permitted. Chipotle CFO Jack Hartung told CNBC this week after the FDA's approval that the company was looking to get feedback from employees and had not yet made a decision on...
    SACRAMENTO —  After ceding power to Gov. Gavin Newsom throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, state lawmakers are now considering one of the most politically challenging government mandates yet: requiring Californians to show proof of vaccination to enter many indoor business establishments and forcing workers to get vaccinated or regularly tested. Democratic legislators leading the conversation at the state Capitol believe mandates provide an opportunity to improve vaccination rates and help lessen the effects of the Delta variant spreading through California. But the proposal, which is still in draft form and has not been introduced in a bill, requires weighing serious considerations such as enforcement, costs, implementation, the political will of the state Legislature and how such a sweeping statewide mandate could help or hurt Newsom’s chances of beating back a possible recall. “There’s literally nothing more personal than taking the vaccine shot, so it’s going to elicit a reaction, no matter what,” said Robin Swanson, a Democratic political consultant. “I think that the Legislature doing this takes a little bit of heat off of the governor, but at the...
                          Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Monday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths to date: 628,503.      As of this morning, 60.7 percent of the U.S. population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 51.5 percent is fully vaccinated, according to the Bloomberg News global vaccine tracker. Evacuations of Americans, allied personnel, and thousands of Afghan translators, interpreters and their families from the chaotic Kabul airport could stretch beyond the Aug. 31 deadline for the withdrawal of U.S. forces, President BidenJoe BidenHenri downgraded to tropical depression as it dumps rain on northeast Britain to urge G7 leaders to consider adopting sanctions against Taliban:...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- An ABC7 data journalism analysis of K-12 school discipline numbers found drastic differences in which students get suspended and how often.The majority of schools in our largest districts are facing discipline practices that disproportionately suspend Black and Latino students.RELATED: Bay Area school district grapples with learning loss among students of color, low-income householdsDuring the 2017-2018 school year (the most recent data available), two-thirds of schools in the San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and San Jose, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara metro areas reported unequal discipline practices, according to the Department of Education."Nobody has ever taken the time to actually get to know who I am," Bay Area teen Lanyiah Green, who has faced excessive discipline since the third grade, told ABC7 News earlier this year. "They just pushed me out without even trying to understand me. I feel like being a Black girl is just all around hard."Green has been pushed out of Pittsburg Unified School District's traditional classroom environment and into an independent study program after being excessively disciplined by educators."They suspended her 23 times in one year,...
    (CNN)Democrats on Capitol Hill are grappling with the political fallout in Washington of a crisis they warned the Biden administration months ago could become a fiasco on the world stage, as horrific images pour out of Kabul with residents desperately trying to flee. Democrats are now in the midst of a political firestorm and struggling to find a way to both back President Joe Biden on an exit from Afghanistan many thought was long overdue, while acknowledging the administration made major tactical mistakes that could have been avoided. Members of his party in Congress nearly all backed Biden when he announced plans to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan in April, but many Democrats have been infuriated by the administration's slow response to evacuating Afghans who worked alongside the US military and are now at risk. The images of a hasty withdrawal of Americans and the chaos at the Kabul airport are conflicting with the administration's claims that they were carrying out an orderly withdrawal."These past few days have been difficult to process, and not because the Taliban's progress was surprising,"...
    Medical staff push a stretcher with a deceased patient out of the COVID-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Go Nakamura/Getty Images The rise in cases in Texas has led hospitals to nearly reach full capacity. The new wave in COVID-19 cases amid the spread of the Delta variant resulted in as little as six empty ICU beds in the city of Austin. Doctors working in the Texas capital told Insider about their experience working in hospitals overwhelmed with patients.  10 Things in Politics: The latest in politics & the economy Loading Something is loading. Email address By clicking ‘Sign up’, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider as well as other partner offers and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. It's the phone call that gets to Dr. Anna Vu-Wallace the most. At the end of her 12-hour shift in the intensive care unit in a city where bed availability is low, Vu-Wallace has to break harrowing news to family members of patients,...
    DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – North Texas school districts are set to address learning loss due to COVID-19 pandemic-related online education last year, while dealing with the new challenges of the delta variant. More than 2,000 Dallas ISD students from five schools returned to campuses on Monday, August 2. READ MORE: Dwindling Number Of 911 Call-Takers Has Fort Worth Looking For Solutions Dallas ISD’s H.I. Holland Elementary started the school year in safety vests. “Our actual theme for this year is under construction,” Principal Shanieka Christmas-McDonald said. “Redesigning today for a better tomorrow.” Following an extended calendar in an effort to address learning loss, this year they’re offering students more built-in social and emotional learning time. A morning meeting to check in and see how they’re doing and a closing circle to end their day. “That was always an obstacle and a challenge for us, just having enough time to make sure we are meeting our scholars where they are so they can grow effectively,” Christmas-McDonald said. As students head back to school, the number of pediatric patients across North Texas is...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged the Biden administration on Monday to stave off looming evictions by extending a moratorium after Congress failed to do it last week, and the California Democrat wrote to fellow lawmakers, urging them to help speed up the distribution of federal COVID-19 aid meant for renters and landlords. Pelosi wrote to fellow Democrats on Monday instructing them to use the seven-week recess to “urge the immediate disbursement of funds,” allocated earlier this year by Congress to prevent evictions and help landlords. Local governments have distributed only a fraction of the $46.5 billion in aid for both renters and landlords. DEMOCRATS DEMAND MASKS AND VACCINES AS CONFIDENCE PLUMMETS On Sunday, Democrats called on Biden to extend the moratorium on evictions, which expired Saturday. “The money must flow, and the moratorium must be extended by the Administration,” Pelosi wrote. House Democrats are grappling with backlash from their base after leaving town for the August recess without extending the moratorium themselves. A group of liberal House Democrats has been camped out on...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Throughout the pandemic, the federal government has relied on states and local jurisdictions to quickly get rent relief to tenants — but some local leaders in Maryland have had to get creative to work around red tape and other legal requirements slowing down that process. It’s difficult to quantify exactly how much rent relief funding has gone to tenants in Maryland since the onset of the pandemic: A slew of federal relief efforts, from the CARES Act last year to the more recent American Rescue Plan Act, have earmarked funding for rent relief, and local jurisdictions have adopted a variety of methods to distribute that funding. A recent U.S. Treasury report on Emergency Rental Assistance Program (ERA1) funding from the Consolidated Appropriations Act found that Maryland’s state government lagged behind others in terms of distributing funding, although the state and local governments have picked up the pace in recent months. That report doesn’t account for other funding sources,...
    PHOTO VIA ADOBEFlorida is grappling with a wave of COVID-19 infections that is sending more young people to hospitals, forcing some facilities to limit visitors and reschedule elective surgeries and prompting elected officials to plead for people to get vaccinated. During a news conference with top Northeast Florida hospital officials, Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry made a plea for COVID-19 vaccinations, saying 800 people, most of them unvaccinated, were in area hospitals. “The vaccine is the best tool we have to protect ourselves, our friends, our neighbors and our loved ones,” Curry said. “Despite having access to the vaccines, we are seeing hospitalizations for this virus here in Jacksonville at a level we haven’t seen since the height of the pandemic last year. We have a better solution. It’s a solution that helps prevent severe illness and death, and that is the vaccine, a vaccine that is accessible to basically anyone who wants it.” The pleas for vaccination came as the dangerous delta variant of the coronavirus has spread in Florida and across the country. In Duval County, 49 percent of...
    Tokyo — There are more problems for the troubled Tokyo Olympics. The director of the opening ceremonies was fired just hours before the spectacle is scheduled to kick off. And despite reports that the Games could be canceled, officials said they are "currently proceeding as planned." Team USA's Simone Biles trained with none of the usual spectators in place on Thursday because of COVID restrictions. While she mostly managed to stick her landings, Biles has said she's unsure of how she'll do in actual competition without the energy of a live crowd. There are more than 90 cases of COVID in people connected to the Games. USA volleyball player Taylor Crabb and four other American athletes have been sidelined by positive COVID tests. "After taking every precaution, getting vaccinated and following protocols, I have tested positive for COVID-19," Crabb announced Thursday on Instagram. "I'm symptom-free, thankfully, but deeply disappointed to not be able to join Jake on the sand and compete as a member of Team USA. I've faced adversity before, and I will face it again, but it...
    Disturbing video captured the moment a one-year-old girl was struck by a stray bullet during a gunfight at a convenience store in West Philadelphia as the city and others around the US struggle with a surge in crime.  The shooting took place over the weekend inside a convenience store located on the corner of the neighborhood's 50th Street. Surveillance video shows the baby girl in her mother's arms when chaos erupts and shots are fired from outside and inside the store. The mother, who was at the counter, instinctively wraps her arms around her baby to protect her and runs out of the view of the camera while the shooting continues.  Surveillance footage captures the moment bullets begin to fly at a convenience store with a mother and her one-year-old daughter getting caught up in the violence The mother of the one-year-old baby injured in the shoot out frantically pleads for help after the gunfire ends  Once the gunfire stops the mother reappears with her injured baby in her arms and frantically pleads for help before exiting the...
    Good TV shows that were made into bad movies What Income Level Is Considered Middle Class in Your State? The pandemic-postponed Tokyo Summer Games are both troubled and troubling, but what does that mean for you as a viewer? Here's how to approach an unusual and unprecedented Olympics. © Provided by Sports Illustrated Very Olympic Today is SI’s daily Olympics newsletter. You can receive each issue for free in your inbox by subscribing here. To continue reading the newsletter at SI.com every day, along with the rest of our Olympics coverage, readers can subscribe to SI.com here. People like to say that sports bring us together. The Olympics in particular, we are told repeatedly throughout each broadcast of the Games, unite us and remind us of some sort of shared, universal experience. Well, in 2020 our world got a much different shared experience. While living through the COVID-19 pandemic (which now has a worldwide death toll of more than 4 million) has had its differences from country to country and region to region, the totality of the disruption was felt everywhere,...
    California will embrace one of the nation’s most stringent school mask mandates next fall, but is leaving enforcement to local educators, who are proposing a range of consequences for students who don’t follow the rule — such as issuing warnings or barring them from campus. Some even suggested they may ignore the order because they don’t believe it’s needed. The state’s hands-off position on enforcement comes after several days of rapidly evolving policy announcements at the state and federal level. The movement was especially swift on Monday, when state officials mandated that students who refuse to wear masks be prohibited from campus. Hours later, the enforcement rule was deleted, and the office of Gov. Gavin Newsom said enforcement would be left to local education officials. School administrators must now contemplate how to keep students and staff in line, especially as vaccinated people no longer have to wear masks in many other situations. Adding to concerns are increasing coronavirus infections from the Delta variant — and the knowledge that students younger than 12 are ineligible for vaccines and not all older...
    Princess Diana's statue could drive feuding brothers Prince Harry and Prince William further apart, a royal expert has claimed. The Duke of Cambridge, 39, and the Duke of Sussex, 36, are expected to put any tensions aside for the poignant event on Thursday at Kensington Palace to mark what would have been their late mother's 60th birthday.   However royal expert Angela Levin has suggested the memorial could be a cause for further heartache for the brothers, with Prince Harry trying to 'take ownership of his mother's legacy' with his recent behaviour. Writing in The Telegraph, she said: 'Certainly that statue – dreamt up in the last true summer of brotherly love – could end up casting a long shadow over Diana’s boys unless they find a way to unite, as she would no doubt want more than anything.' It comes as Meghan Markle's friend Omid Scobie argued Prince Charles is right to stay away from memorial because 'his association' with late princess 'isn't positive'.  Princess Diana's statue could drive feuding brothers Prince Harry, 36, and Prince William, 39, further apart, royal expert...
    You don’t have to tell Christi Ginn it’s going to be a challenging summer for air travel. She has already experienced it. The Dublin resident’s flight last week from Phoenix to Oakland that should have taken 90 minutes became a four-hour headache. She, her daughter and other passengers — told that their flight was on time — boarded a Southwest plane that then sat on the tarmac in stifling 115-degree heat. Thankfully, she said, an off-duty pilot taking the flight turned on the air conditioning so the passengers could cool down while they awaited the arrival of their pilots, who had yet to land in Arizona. “No explanation, no apologies, nothing,” she said, adding that others had it worse and missed connecting flights for Hawaiian vacations. “I sent a complaint to Southwest and received a reply the next day that more or less said, sorry, things happen.” Travel experts say things are going to happen, all right, as airlines and airports struggle to meet the pent-up demand for vacations now that more than half of all Americans are fully vaccinated against...
    Washington (CNN)There's a political fight brewing inside the nation's largest Protestant denomination as the Southern Baptist Convention gathers in Nashville this week for its annual meeting.On one side is a hardcore vanguard of conservatives seeking to beat back what's viewed as a move toward "wokeness." On the other is the SBC establishment that's adopted a more conciliatory approach on progressive social issues such as Black Lives Matter, critical race theory and ordaining female ministers -- all in an attempt to attract a broader group of adherents.The battle, which culminates in a vote for a new president on Tuesday, is similar to the current cultural debate raging across the country over questions of race, gender and equality. It also comes as the SBC, like most Christian denominations in the US, faces shrinking membership and an increasingly secular America.That has given rise to an internal conflict with a particularly Trumpian tone to it, pitting a populist group of self-identifying "real" Southern Baptists against those they say would transform the church into something unrecognizable to many traditionalists.Tensions within the SBC have been on...
    More On: joe biden Biden will hold solo press conference after Putin summit next week G7 backs cash splash to push post-COVID economic recovery China official insists COVID lab-leak theory ‘absurd’ in Blinken call Putin won’t deny Biden ‘killer’ claim, says it’s ‘not something I worry about’ President Biden strove to refocus the G-7 Summit on China and infrastructure Saturday as he met one-on-one with French President Emmanuel Macron in his only formal bilateral confab of the day. “Things are going, I think, well,” said a relaxed-looking Biden, squinting in the bright sunlight as the blue waters of Carbis Bay sparkled in the background. “As we say back in the States, we’re on the same page.” Macron cited some of the hot-button issues — including climate change and the pandemic, but not ongoing conflicts with China — the G-7 countries are grappling with. “For all these issues what we need is cooperation,” Macron told Biden. “And what you demonstrate is, leadership is partnership.” But the warm exchange came shortly after deep divisions emerged within the group of leaders of...
    Businesses are struggling to track employee hours in a COVID-19 world of remote work, and some have become the target of wage-and-hour claims from disgruntled workers who have been furloughed or laid off. John Viola, an employment lawyer with Thompson Coburn LLP, said employers have seen an uptick in claims from displaced employees who are taking legal action as a remedy to their situation. Although motivated by their loss of work as a result of the pandemic, the claims are typically not tied to COVID-19, he said. “The actions are usually linked to issues that weren’t brought to light before the health crisis hit,” Viola said. “It could be a case where someone alleges unpaid wages or they were not getting lunch or rest breaks.” Employees have a year in which to bring file a claim under the Private Attorneys General Act. That authorizes workers to file lawsuits to recover civil penalties on behalf of themselves, other employees and the state of California for labor code violations. “You can also bring a civil action as yourself,” Viola said. “That can...
    WHEAT RIDGE, Colo. (CBS4) – Some Denver-area restaurants are removing items from menus or even temporarily closing because they don’t have enough chicken wings. King of Wings was prepared to close on Wednesday night if its shipment of wings didn’t arrive before the dinner rush. (credit CBS) “A lot of nervousness, this chicken shortage has been going on a while and it hasn’t caught up to us. It finally did,” said Eddie Renshaw, co-owner of King of Wings. “These just got here, so we were supposed receive our order at 9:30 this morning. Unfortunately it didn’t come until 3:30. We had a limited amount of wings to start the day.” Eddie Renshaw (credit CBS) On Monday, the popular restaurant in Wheat Ridge closed because of a wing shortage. Demand is so high that a shipment that arrived on Tuesday and should have lasted a few days was nearly gone. Renshaw says it’s not just a quantity issue, but also quality. “You see broken bones, huge wings next to small wings. Our supplier says this is the worst it’s been in...