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    Sydney (CNN Business)Trade ties between Australia and China worsened over the past year as the two countries became mired in a diplomatic dispute. Now it appears those problems, and the pandemic, are also hitting investment. Chinese investment in Australia plunged to just over 1 billion Australian dollars ($775 million) in 2020, down 62% from the previous year, according to a report released Monday by the Australian National University's Chinese Investment in Australia Database.That's also down nearly 94% from a peak of 16.5 billion Australian dollars ($12.8 billion) in 2016, according to the study. The countries are big economic partners in Asia Pacific. China, the world's second biggest economy, was Australia's largest trading partner in 2018, with trade between the two valued at 215 billion Australian dollars ($158 billion), according to official statistics. And some Australian exports, such as iron ore, remain vital to powering Chinese industry during the post-Covid 19...
    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Political strife in Haiti has deepened as opposition leaders and supporters claim that President Jovenel Moïse’s five-year term has expired, demanding that he step down on Feb. 7. But on that day, Moïse announced that authorities had arrested 23 people accused of plotting an alleged coup to kill him and overthrow his government, including a high-ranking police official and a Supreme Court judge favored by the opposition. Hours after the arrests, the opposition nominated a supposed transitional president that no one has recognized. The AP explains what is driving the protests and what the ongoing demonstrations and alleged coup conspiracy mean for Haiti. WHO IS PROTESTING AND WHY? Opposition leaders from various political parties organized protests in the weeks leading up to Feb. 7, the day they allege that Moïse’s term ended. Hundreds of supporters marched in the streets, often clashing with police as they clamored...
    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Political strife in Haiti has deepened as opposition leaders and supporters claim that President Jovenel Moïse’s five-year term has expired, demanding that he step down on Feb. 7. But on that day, Moïse announced that authorities had arrested 23 people accused of plotting an alleged coup to kill him and overthrow his government, including a high-ranking police official and a Supreme Court judge favored by the opposition. Hours after the arrests, the opposition nominated a supposed transitional president that no one has recognized. The AP explains what is driving the protests and what the ongoing demonstrations and alleged coup conspiracy mean for Haiti. WHO IS PROTESTING AND WHY? Opposition leaders from various political parties organized protests in the weeks leading up to Feb. 7, the day they allege that Moïse’s term ended. Hundreds of supporters marched in the streets, often clashing with police as they clamored...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden's nominee for education secretary is promising to help reopen schools but says much of the hardest work will come after that as schools try to address long-standing disparities worsened by the pandemic."These inequities will endure, and prevent the potential of this great country, unless tackled head-on," Miguel Cardona said in testimony prepared for a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing Wednesday. "And so it is our responsibility, and it would be my greatest privilege, if confirmed, to forge opportunity out of this crisis."Cardona, 45, became Connecticut's state education chief in 2019 after spending years as a teacher and administrator in the public school district in Meriden, Connecticut, which he also attended as a child. If confirmed, he is expected to play a pivotal role in supporting schools as they recover from a crisis that has laid bare many of their shortcomings.In his testimony,...
    By COLLIN BINKLEY, AP Education Writer President Joe Biden's nominee for education secretary is promising to help reopen schools but says much of the hardest work will come after that as schools try to address long-standing disparities worsened by the pandemic. “These inequities will endure, and prevent the potential of this great country, unless tackled head-on,” Miguel Cardona said in testimony prepared for a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing Wednesday. “And so it is our responsibility, and it would be my greatest privilege, if confirmed, to forge opportunity out of this crisis.” Cardona, 45, became Connecticut's state education chief in 2019 after spending years as a teacher and administrator in the public school district in Meriden, Connecticut, which he also attended as a child. If confirmed, he is expected to play a pivotal role in supporting schools as they recover from a crisis that has laid bare...
    President Joe Biden’s nominee for education secretary is promising to help reopen schools but says much of the hardest work will come after that as schools try to address long-standing disparities worsened by the pandemic. “These inequities will endure, and prevent the potential of this great country, unless tackled head-on,” Miguel Cardona said in testimony prepared for a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing Wednesday. “And so it is our responsibility, and it would be my greatest privilege, if confirmed, to forge opportunity out of this crisis.” Cardona, 45, became Connecticut’s state education chief in 2019 after spending years as a teacher and administrator in the public school district in Meriden, Connecticut, which he also attended as a child. If confirmed, he is expected to play a pivotal role in supporting schools as they recover from a crisis that has laid bare many of their shortcomings. In his...
    Suarez Navarro dreams of Olympic return after cancer treatment The most mispronounced places in America H&M Warns Profit Outlook Has Worsened on Lockdowns, Discounts (Bloomberg) -- Hennes & Mauritz AB warned it’ll be difficult to make a profit this quarter due to lockdowns, leading the Swedish clothing retailer to increase discounts to clear out a longstanding inventory buildup. © Bloomberg Pedestrians, wearing protective face masks, pass a Hennes & Mauritz AB (H&M) store in Stockholm, Sweden, on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021. Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven has said he can’t rule out further restrictions under a temporary new law to combat the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. The stock fell as much as 5.3%. Sales plunged 23% in local currencies so far this quarter after lockdowns forced the retailer to shutter more than a third of its stores, the owner of the H&M chain said Friday. Load Error ...
    A new report from the Department of Justice’s Office of the Inspector General paints a dire picture of problems that exacerbated a deadly coronavirus outbreak last year at Terminal Island federal prison. The report, released Wednesday, found that officials at the low-security prison in San Pedro struggled to keep inmates socially distanced and did not adequately quarantine those who tested positive for the virus, which ultimately infected more than 70% of the prison population and killed 10 inmates. Investigators found that the prison failed to identify the virus early in many of those who eventually died and that five of the 10 “did not receive a COVID-19 test until after staff sent them to the hospital.” Terminal Island officials told the inspector general’s investigators that three of those five inmates did not initially show COVID-19 symptoms and that staff sent the other two inmates to the hospital the same day...
    The economy shed 140,000 jobs in December, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday, the first losses since April, reflecting renewed economic closures amid a worsening coronavirus pandemic that has infected more than 21.5 million people in the United States and killed more than 365,000. The unemployment rate remained flat at 6.7%. "It has never been more true that the path of the economy depends on the course of the virus, and right now, new Covid outbreaks across the nation are threatening to bring the economy down with it," said Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at MUFG. Employment in the leisure and hospitality sector declined by 498,000 jobs. Of those losses, 372,000 came from the restaurant industry alone. Those steep losses were offset in part by gains in business services, retail trade, construction, and transportation and warehousing. Since February, the leisure and hospitality industry has shed 3.9...
    (CNN)Pediatricians like us have seen it over and over again in the last few months -- kids who have put on 5, sometimes 10, at times even 20 pounds -- since the onset of the pandemic. In a year filled with so much tragedy and suffering, it would be easy to dismiss a few extra pounds in a child or to think of weight gain as a problem to be solved once the pandemic recedes. But the weight gain we are seeing in kids is neither trivial nor can it wait. New US dietary guidelines include recs for babies and toddlers for first time The specifics leading to weight gain vary. Sometimes it's Dad, who recently took over the cooking and may be overfeeding the kids; other times it's Grandma, who has been spoiling them now that they're home; for still others, favorite sports are no longer an option, or...
    DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- At the Union Rescue Mission in downtown Los Angeles - where residents of Skid Row get housing and help - two crises are colliding: Homelessness and the COVID-19 pandemic."The battle to save the lives of our guests, the battle to save the lives of our staff. We're in the battle of our lives and it's like playing chess with a monster genius," said the Rev. Andy Bales, CEO of the mission.Like every other local shelter in Los Angeles County, capacity at the Union Rescue Mission has dropped from about 1,000 people to just 350. That's because more homeless people are getting COVID-19.Those who are sick need to be under quarantine or isolation - and that means there's less space for other homeless people. Senior citizens are being hit the hardest according to local officials."One sweet senior thought she had COVID and we put her in...
    BHOPAL, India (Reuters) - Protesters in the central Indian city of Bhopal formed a human chain on Thursday to demand justice for people suffering cancer, blindness, respiratory, immune and neurological problems from the world's worst industrial disaster 36 years ago. In the early hours of December 3, 1984, methyl isocyanate gas leaked from a pesticide factory owned by American Union Carbide Corporation. More than half a million people were poisoned that night and the official death toll exceeded 5,000. Thousands of survivors have said they, their children and grandchildren are struggling with chronic health problems as a result of the leak and toxic waste left behind and face hefty medical bills at a time when the pandemic is making their health even more fragile. Dow Chemical, which now owns Union Carbide, has denied liability, saying it bought the company a decade after Union Carbide settled its liabilities to the Indian...
    By CASEY SMITH, Associated Press/Report for America INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Dozens of Indiana schools are struggling to stay open as growing numbers of coronavirus infections and related quarantines exacerbate a preexisting statewide teacher and substitute shortage. As of last Monday, 1,755 schools across the state have reported at least one positive case of COVID-19, according to the Indiana State Department of Health’s weekly data update. That brings the statewide total to more than 15,000 students, teachers and staff who have tested positive for the coronavirus. While some schools have elected to close their doors entirely, others are asking teachers to continue with in-person instruction. Oftentimes, that means taking on more classes and duties to compensate for those out sick or in quarantine. In other instances, that's also meant teachers are asked to keep working even after they’ve been exposed to COVID-19. That's been the case in Shelbyville Central Schools, 30...
    LONDON (Reuters) - The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened inequality in Britain, Labour's would-be finance minister Anneliese Dodds said on Monday, criticising the government's response to the crisis as wasteful and divisive. "We went into this crisis as one of the most unequal countries in Europe. The pandemic has only made that worse," Dodds told a Reuters Newsmaker event. "This government claims it has the answers to regional inequality. But the Conservatives have simply not delivered, and regional inequalities have deepened." (Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge, writing by William James; Editing by Kate Holton) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, vaccines, coronavirus, United Kingdom, Europe
    Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Sunday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “AM Joy” that President Donald Trump’s “ignorance” had worsened the coronavirus pandemic. Guest host Jonathan Capehart asked, “As the mayor of a major American city, as the mayor of Chicago, do you feel abandoned by the federal government as a result of its inaction, as a result of there the not being a national plan to get a handle on the coronavirus pandemic?” Lightfoot said, “Well, from the earliest days of this pandemic, I knew that the federal government was not going to be helpful. The CDC has been helpful, but the White House, HHS, DHS, they have not even had a plan, and I knew that we were on our own. I knew that from the earliest days when they were diverting flights from China to airports across the country, Chicago being one of them. But what is worse and...
    The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is operating under a judicial order to report its on-time performance every day, and those reports are trending badly in some key battleground states. For the third day in a row, on Sunday it reported moving fewer ballots on time than the previous day, That puts ballots in the system at risk of not being received in time in 28 states that require ballots be received on or before Election Day. The USPS reported moving 97% of ballots on time Wednesday, then 93% on Friday, and 91% on Saturday. That's at a national level. In battleground states, the on-time rate is below 90% and in some of these states, it’s disastrously low. In central Pennsylvania, the on-time rate for ballots was just 62% on Saturday. Atlanta's was just 64%, same as ballots processed in Maine and New Hampshire. Less than half—43%—of ballots were on time Saturday in Colorado....
    The ability to afford buying a home has declined since the pandemic hit the nation, according to the National Association of Realtors, but that does not make the purchase unaffordable. The organization’s latest “Housing Affordability Index” shows that affordability was on the rise at the start of the year until April, at which point it declined. The reason for the decline in affordability is that median incomes have trended down since April, while the income required to purchase a home has trended up as home prices have increased. Still, a drop in affordability does not mean that homes are unaffordable. The NAR’s index found that median income levels in all parts of the country were above the required level to afford a median-priced home. The index also showed that in August, the Midwest was the most affordable region in the country to buy a home. The median income for...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — As more people at the White House test positive for COVID-19, many are wondering when it will end and what can be learned about the virus is spread. President Trump announces the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his choice for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C on Sept. 26. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images) Dr. Jesse O’Shea, an infectious disease specialist, says COVID-19 has the unique ability to be highly contagious, but not lethal enough to kill itself off. “I think it’s showing us how brilliant COVID-19 really is,” Shea said of the White House outbreak. As of Monday, more than a dozen people at the White House have tested positive for the virus in less than one week. The latest was White House Press...
    By ERICA BREUNLIN, The Colorado Sun DENVER (AP) — Alamosa School District is so short on educators that all it might take is the quarantine of a single class to leave many kids without a teacher. That’s largely because the southern Colorado district of 2,178 students is battling a significant K-12 substitute teacher shortage. Coronavirus fears have chased a large percentage of the sub pool away, Interim Superintendent Marsha Cody said. “We actually need more subs than ever before, when we have less,” Cody said. It’s a problem other Colorado districts can sympathize with as the state faces a substitute teacher shortage that also reflects a burgeoning teacher shortage. The pandemic is only making it worse. In Denver Public Schools, the largest district in Colorado, a little more than half of the teachers active in the substitute pool said they were willing to take in-person assignments this fall. Now, districts...
    After the announcement of her coronavirus diagnosis early on Friday morning, the first lady appears to be doing well. "Her symptoms have not worsened, and she continues to rest. She remains in touch with her husband," Melania Trump's chief of staff said in a statement Saturday morning. "She is thinking of all who are ill and wishes them a speedy recovery." During a Saturday afternoon press conference, Dr. Sean Conley, the president's physician, indicated that both the president and the first lady were doing well. President Trump is receiving medical treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, but the first lady is not. "She has no indication for hospitalization or advanced therapy. She’s convalescing at home," said Conley when asked why Melania Trump was not there as well. In the past few hours, questions have arisen as to whether the White House has been fully...
    According to NPR, hotline calls to the National Eating Disorders Association are up by 70-percent to 80-percent. For many people eating is a form of control and a coping mechanism tied to stress, experts said. Food scarcity and stockpiling behavior can trigger anxieties about eating or overeating. According to the CEO of the National Eating Disorders Association, eating disorders have a strong link to trauma. A survey in the International Journal of Eating Disorders showed, 62-percent of people in the U.S. with anorexia said their symptoms have worsened since the pandemic started. Some people’s symptoms worsened because they had a lack of structure, social support, and lived in a triggering environment, said Christine Peat, co-author of the study. People with eating disorders also said working from home has also caused to binge eat food, since it’s more accessible to them during all times of the day. Copyright 2020 by KSAT...
    A new report from Republicans on the House Foreign Affairs Committee contends the Chinese Communist Party’s alleged coronavirus cover-up and the World Health Organization’s actions allowed the coronavirus outbreak to grow into the lengthy and deadly pandemic that persists to this day. The 90-page report, titled The Origins of the COVID-19 Global Pandemic, Including the Roles of the Chinese Communist Party and the World Health Organization, is severely critical of both the Chinese government and the WHO’s leadership, noting that “research shows the CCP could have reduced the number of cases in China by up to 95% had it fulfilled its obligations under international law and responded to the outbreak in a manner consistent with best practices” and asserting that “it is highly likely the ongoing pandemic could have been prevented” had China followed its obligations under the 2005 International Health Regulations and the WHO pushed China to be...
    SCOTTSBORO, Ala. (AP) — A fire that killed eight people and did more than $500,000 damage at an Alabama marina started accidentally but was worsened by the marina’s “limited fire safety practices,” according to a federal report. The National Transportation Safety Board, in a report released this month, said the Jan. 27 fire started near the electrical panel of a houseboat named Dixie Delight at the Jackson County Park Marina in Scottsboro. The fire spread quickly because of the abundance of combustible lawn furniture and propane cylinders for barbecue grills on the dock and boat decks. The report found the county and marina’s “limited fire safety practices” contributing to the severity of the fire and loss of life. “The fire spread due to the neighboring vessels of similar fiberglass construction, an abundance of combustible lawn furniture on the vessel decks and open dock areas, and the presence of portable liquid...
    SCOTTSBORO, Ala. (AP) — A fire that killed eight people and did more than $500,000 damage at an Alabama marina started accidentally but was worsened by the marina’s “limited fire safety practices,” according to a federal report. The National Transportation Safety Board, in a report released this month, said the Jan. 27 fire started near the electrical panel of a houseboat named Dixie Delight at the Jackson County Park Marina in Scottsboro. The fire spread quickly because of the abundance of combustible lawn furniture and propane cylinders for barbecue grills on the dock and boat decks. The report found the county and marina’s “limited fire safety practices” contributing to the severity of the fire and loss of life. “The fire spread due to the neighboring vessels of similar fiberglass construction, an abundance of combustible lawn furniture on the vessel decks and open dock areas, and the presence of portable liquid...
    Microsoft founder Bill Gates claims President Donald Trumps executive orders in the spring banning travel into the country from countries where the novel coronavirus was spreading worsened the outbreak in the United States. "We created this rush, and we didnt have the ability to test or quarantine those people," Gates said in an interview with the Fox News set to air Sunday. "And so that seeded the disease here. You know, the ban probably accelerated that, the way it was executed.” Interviewer Chris Wallace pressed Gates about how the prohibitions made the situation worse. "March saw this incredible explosion – the West Coast coming from China and then the East Coast coming out of Europe, and so, even though wed seen China and wed seen Europe, that testing capacity and clear message of how to behave wasnt there," Gates said. Trump banned travel from China – where many believe the virus...
    Microsoft founder and billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates said President Donald Trump’s coronavirus travel ban “accelerated” the spread of the pandemic. In a preview clip from a “Fox News Sunday,” Gates said that the travel ban “seeded the disease here.” Gates said, “We created this rush, and we didn’t have the ability to test or quarantine those people, so that seeded the disease here. You know, the ban probably accelerated that, the way it was executed.” Anchor Chris Wallace asked, “I just want to pick up on that. You’re saying that the travel bans made this situation worse, not better?” Gates replied, “March saw this incredible explosion. The West Coast coming from China, and then the East Coast coming out of Europe, and so even though we’d seen China and we’d seen Europe, that testing capacity and clear message of how to behave wasn’t there.” Follow Pam Key on Twitter @pamkeyNEN
    Microsoft founder Bill Gates told "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace President Trump may have worsened the coronavirus pandemic with his travel bans, in an exclusive interview set to air this weekend. On Jan. 31, Trump issued a travel ban on China after the coronavirus broke out in Wuhan before issuing others in February and March, banning travel from Europe and other countries with coronavirus outbreaks. "We created this rush, and we didn’t have the ability to test or quarantine those people," the billionaire philanthropist said. Bill Gates takes issue with President Trump's coronavirus travel bans in an exclusive interview with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace. (Photo by Thierry Monasse/Getty Images) "And so that seeded the disease here. You know, the ban probably accelerated that, the way it was executed," Gates said. BIDEN, HARRIS CONCERNS ABOUT TRUMP INTERFERENCE IN CORONAVIRUS VACCINE NOT SHARED BY TOP HEALTH EXPERTS Wallace...
    Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Bill Gates claimed on Fox News that President Donald Trump’s coronavirus travel ban may have made the spread of Covid-19 worse. In a Fox News Sunday interview with Chris Wallace — which is set to air in full on Sunday — Gates said that the travel ban “created this rush, and we didn’t have the ability to test or quarantine those people, so that seeded the disease here.” “You know, the ban probably accelerated that, the way it was executed,” he added. Watch the latest video at foxnews.com Wallace questioned, “I just want to pick up on that. You’re saying that the travel bans made this situation worse, not better?” Gates replied, “March saw this incredible explosion. The West Coast coming from China, and then the East Coast coming out of Europe, and so even though we’d seen China and we’d seen Europe, that testing capacity and...
    Loading the player... Chris Rock has a new show debuting during the pandemic, and this week, he pulled no punches outlining all the things he believes have gone wrong since COVID-19 changed life as we know it. As we previously reported, during an interview with the New York Times, the comedian shared how the pandemic has impacted both his comedy and acting. He argued that while everyone is mad at President Donald Trump for mishandling the response to the virus, in his mind House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic party played a hand as well. READ MORE: Naomi Osaka: Trolls who said ‘keep politics out of sports’ inspired me to win The comedian saied the Dems let “the pandemic come in” because they were too preoccupied with the president’s impeachment hearings earlier this year. “It was totally up to Pelosi and the Democrats. Their thing was, ‘We’re going to...
    Eating disorders are thriving as the COVID-19 pandemic stretches into its sixth month of reshaping American life. Hotline calls to the National Eating Disorders Association are up 70-80% in recent months, according to a Tuesday report by NPR. For many Americans, eating is tied to stress, anxiety and other disorders. Often an emotional coping mechanism, it can be triggered by food scarcity and stockpiling behavior. PERCENTAGE OF AMERICANS REPORTING DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS TRIPLES DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC; STUDY SHOWS In July, an International Journal of Eating Disorders survey of 1,000 participants found that 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia nervosa -- a disorder characterized by extremely limited eating and abnormally low weight -- experienced a worsening of symptoms as the pandemic hit. Almost a third of Americans with the more common bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorders reported an increase in episodes. Forbes reported at the time that when asked Likert-scale questions -- with multiple-choice responses from “not at all concerned” to “very concerned” -- about how various COVID-19-related stressors...
    China’s state-run Xinhua news agency published a glowing profile on Tuesday of the work dictator Xi Jinping allegedly did to contain the Chinese coronavirus pandemic, heaping praise on Xi for leading teleconferences and giving “important instructions” to underlings. Xi notably vacated the political spotlight for months following the initial revelation in January that Communist Party scientists had identified a novel form of coronavirus in the central city of Wuhan. After a brief public appearance in Beijing at the height of the outbreak in Wuhan hundreds of miles away, Xi visited Wuhan in March, after local officials had contained the virus. He similarly made visits to provinces like Zhejiang and Shaanxi, far from the most severely affected, that made it into Xinhua’s coverage of his activities. In keeping with Chinese Communist Party autocratic tradition, Xi has not faced journalists or given the public an opportunity to address the pandemic with him...
    Shinzo Abe, the longest-serving prime minister in Japan’s historical past, is predicted to resign over well being points, experiences mentioned early Friday. Japan’s nationwide broadcaster mentioned that the prime minister will announce in a press convention Friday night that he “intends to resign as his sickness has worsened and he worries it’s going to trigger hassle.” Abe, 65, went to the hospital final Monday — his second go to in every week. Following his Monday journey to Keio College Hospital in Tokyo, Abe tried to quell considerations about his well being, telling reporters outdoors his official residence that he had gone again to the physician to be taught take a look at outcomes from the week prior. Nippon TV, a Japanese information broadcaster, reported Monday that regardless of Abe’s declare that he had been within the hospital for examinations, he was truly being handled for ulcerative colitis. Abe has...
    Shinzo Abe, the longest-serving prime minister in Japan’s history, is expected to resign over health issues, reports said early Friday. Japan’s national broadcaster said that the prime minister will announce in a press conference Friday evening that he “intends to resign as his illness has worsened and he worries it will cause trouble.” Abe, 65, went to the hospital last Monday — his second visit in a week. Following his Monday trip to Keio University Hospital in Tokyo, Abe tried to quell concerns about his health, telling reporters outside his official residence that he had gone back to the doctor to learn test results from the week prior. Nippon TV, a Japanese news broadcaster, reported Monday that despite Abe’s claim that he had been in the hospital for examinations, he was actually being treated for ulcerative colitis. Abe has publicly acknowledged having the chronic illness, even resigning from his...
    Shinzo Abe, the longest-serving prime minister in Japan’s history, is expected to resign over health issues, reports said early Friday. Japan’s national broadcaster said that the prime minister will announce in a press conference Friday evening that he “intends to resign as his illness has worsened and he worries it will cause trouble.” Abe, 65, went to the hospital last Monday — his second visit in a week. Following his Monday trip to Keio University Hospital in Tokyo, Abe tried to quell concerns about his health, telling reporters outside his official residence that he had gone back to the doctor to learn test results from the week prior. Nippon TV, a Japanese news broadcaster, reported Monday that despite Abe’s claim that he had been in the hospital for examinations, he was actually being treated for ulcerative colitis. Abe has publicly acknowledged having the chronic illness, even resigning from his first...
    Bella Hadid walks the runway during the Jean-Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2020 show as part of Paris Fashion Week at Theatre Du Chatelet on January 22, 2020 in Paris, France. Peter White/Getty Images 23-year-old model Bella Hadid shared her personal story with Lyme disease on Instagram, detailing symptoms like headaches, joint pain, brain fog, fatigue, and fever. Hadid said she has struggled with the illness nearly every day since she was about 14, with symptoms worsening after age 18.  Chronic lyme disease is sometimes a controversial term that can refer to a variety of different illnesses after an infection caused by a tick bite. It's not well understood, and treatment can be tricky.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Bella Hadid has offered a rare glimpse into her personal battle with chronic illness on Instagram, sharing in her Stories that the "invisible illness" has become more...
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    Workers from the service industry, fast-food chains and the gig economy rallied with organized labor Monday to protest systemic racism and economic inequality, staging demonstrations across the U.S. and around the world seeking better treatment of Black Americans in the workplace. Organizers said at least 20,000 workers in 160 cities walked off the job, inspired by the racial reckoning that followed the deaths of several Black men and women at the hands of police. Visible support came largely in protests that drew people whose jobs in health care, transportation and construction do not allow them to work from home during the coronavirus pandemic. “What the protesters are saying, that if we want to be concerned — and we should be — about police violence and people getting killed by the police … we have to also be concerned about the people who are dying and being put into lethal situations...
    As the country experiences records of contamination, the wearing of masks has become an ideological marker in the cultural war raging since the advent of Donald Trump. The post In the United States, the coronavirus epidemic worsened by “anti-masks” appeared first on Analogik.
    Renuka Shahane had earlier taken to her Twitter account to reveal how Akshay Kumar had helped her good friend and TV actress Nupur Alankar with her financial woes. The actress was among the many victims of PMC Bank crisis and later with coronavirus lockdown in place, her condition went from worse to worst. She has an ailing mother to take care of and though her friends reached out to help her initially, the expenses kept on piling. Nupur finally had to visit different NGOs for medicines and is glad that she reached out to people for help. In her recent interaction with Bombay Times, Nupur elaborated on her financial worries and reveals why she had to finally seek help from various crowdfunding sites. “Help poured in from many friends, but the medical and other expenses kept rising. Then came a point where I started approaching various NGOs for free...
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