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    The federal civil rights trial for the four Minneapolis police officers charged in connection with the death of George Floyd is slated to begin in January, according to a letter sent to prospective jurors.  The questionnaires mailed out to potential jurors orders them to report on Jan. 20 to the courthouse where Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thao and Thomas Lane will stand trial.  DEREK CHAUVIN HIRES NEW LAWYER TO APPEAL CONVICTION IN MURDER OF GEORGE FLOYD  This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows from left, former Minneapolis police officers Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. The federal civil rights trial of the four former Minneapolis police officers indicted in the killing of George Floyd is on track to begin in January, according to a judge's letter.  (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP, File) U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson noted that some of the questions could seem a bit intrusive in an attempt to find an impartial panel in such a highly-publicized case....
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The federal civil rights trial of the four former Minneapolis police officers indicted in the killing of George Floyd is on track to begin in January, according to a judge’s letter. U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson earlier this month mailed out jury questionnaires ordering prospective jurors in the case to report to the courthouse on Jan. 20. The trial of Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thao and Thomas Lane will run through mid-February, according to a copy of the summons packet obtained by the Star Tribune. A federal grand jury in May indicted Chauvin, Lane, Kueng and Thao for allegedly depriving Floyd of his rights while acting under government authority. The 46-year-old Floyd was held face-down, handcuffed and not resisting in a restraint. The arrest was captured on bystander video and sparked protests in the Twin Cities and elsewhere. Chauvin was convicted in state court in April of murder and manslaughter. Some issues are still lingering ahead of the trial, including a magistrate judge’s ruling that the four officers should be tried together. Attorneys for...
    A judge ruled Monday that the four ex-Minneapolis police officers facing federal charges for allegedly infringing on George Floyd’s civil rights will face trial together.  U.S. Magistrate Judge Tony Leung denied a motion from the lawyers representing J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane, and Tou Thao to keep the proceedings separate, citing "the significant overlap and interplay of the charges against them."  DEREK CHAUVIN HIRES NEW LAWYER TO APPEAL CONVICTION IN MURDER OF GEORGE FLOYD  Derek Chauvin, who was videoed kneeling on the upper back and neck of George Floyd on May 25, 2020 in Minneapolis while Floyd was handcuffed and faced down, was already convicted of murder in state court and sentenced to 22 ½ years behind bars back in June.  FILE - This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows from left, former Minneapolis police officers Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. The former Minneapolis police officers charged with violating George Floyd's civil rights are scheduled to be arraigned in federal court Tuesday,...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The four officers who are federally charged in the death of George Floyd will be tried together, after a motion was denied to sever three of the officers from Derek Chauvin, who has already been convicted of murder in Floyd’s death. A federal grand jury indicted Chauvin, Kueng, Thao and Lane in May, alleging they violated Floyd’s rights while acting under government authority as Floyd was restrained face-down, handcuffed and not resisting. READ MORE: Dave Chappelle's George Floyd-Inspired '8:46' Nominated For GrammyIn August, attorneys for J. Kueng and Tou Thao argued that their clients would be unfairly prejudiced if they went to trial alongside Chauvin. An attorney for Thomas Lane filed a motion asking to join in his co-defendants’ request. Keung’s attorney, Tom Plunkett, said evidence against Chauvin would confuse the jury and deprive Kueng of his right to a fair trial. He also said there is a conflict of interest due to Chauvin’s level of culpability in Floyd’s death, saying “the jurors will not be able to follow the Court’s instructions and compartmentalize the evidence as...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When attorneys begin sifting through potential jurors on Tuesday in the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer who says she meant to use her Taser instead of her gun when she killed Daunte Wright, they’ll take a hard look at their attitudes toward policing, protests, and the Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter movements. The prospective jurors in former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter’s manslaughter trial have already responded to questionnaires similar to those used this year in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial for the killing of George Floyd. Roughly 200 people were asked to provide extensive information on what they already know about the Potter case and whether they have positive or negative impressions about her and Wright. Potter shot Wright as he tried to drive away from a traffic stop on April 11 — a time when Chauvin’s trial had begun and tensions were already high in the Minneapolis area. Wright’s death sparked several nights of protests in Brooklyn Center, which revived painful memories of the sometimes violent unrest that erupted after Floyd’s...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — When attorneys sift through potential jurors for the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer who says she meant to use her Taser instead of her gun when she killed Daunte Wright, they’ll take a hard look at their attitudes toward policing, protests, and the Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter movements. Jury selection starts Tuesday in former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter’s manslaughter trial. The pool has already responded to questionnaires similar to those used this year in Derek Chauvin’s murder trial for the killing of George Floyd. Roughly 200 potential jurors were asked to provide extensive information on what they already know about the Potter case and whether they have positive or negative impressions about her and Wright. READ MORE: Daunte Wright Shooting: Will 'Wrong Gun' Defense Work For Kim Potter?Potter shot Wright as he tried to drive away from a traffic stop on April 11 — a time when Chauvin’s trial was taking place and tensions were already high in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Wright’s death sparked several nights of protests in Brooklyn...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minneapolis bank that was badly damaged during protests over the death of George Floyd is giving the property a nonprofit developer to build affordable housing, commercial space and a home for cultural organizations. The 2.4-acre U.S. Bank site is part of the Lake Street commercial corridor that became the target of vandalism and arson in May 2020. READ MORE: Court Panel To Reconvene In January On Video Trial CoverageThe multi-million dollar project will feature businesses led by people of color and community organizations will own portions of the development. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter for killing Floyd, who was Black, by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes. READ MORE: Both Sides On Minneapolis Policing Question Sit Down To Forge Path Forward: 'Let's Do This Together'Floyd’s death sparked violent protests in the Twin Cities and elsewhere. (© Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) MORE NEWS: Derek Chauvin, Ex-Wife Plead...
    ST, PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Democratic Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, who led the prosecution team that won the conviction of ex-officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd, announced Monday he will seek a second term. Ellison assembled a team of attorneys in private practice and from his office that persuaded jurors earlier this year to convict Chauvin of murder. Floyd’s death last year became a flashpoint in the national conversation about the deaths of Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement and sparked worldwide protests. Ellison is Minnesota’s first Black attorney general. He was also the first Muslim elected to Congress, a job he left in 2018 to run for attorney general. He was a prominent booster for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ presidential bid. Ellison and Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington led a task force that proposed steps in 2020 to reduce police-involved deadly force encounters, including a bill for a uniform standard for when such actions are justified and a measure to encourage development of new models for policing. Party officials said in an announcement...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Keith Ellison is set to announce that he will seek re-election as Minnesota’s attorney general. Ellison, a former U.S. representative and deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee, will be seeking a second term after first being elected in 2018. Sen. Amy Klobuchar and St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter are also expected to announce their endorsements for Ellison. READ MORE: Both Sides On Minneapolis Policing Question Sit Down To Forge Path Forward: 'Let's Do This Together'In his first run, Ellison promised to “protect Minnesotans.” His first term has been marked by suits against pharmaceutical companies, the Trump administration and Minnesota businesses that violated COVID-19 restrictions. His most high-profile case was that of Derek Chauvin. The Attorney General’s Office led the prosecution of the former Minneapolis police officer who was convicted of murdering George Floyd in April. Chauvin was sentenced to 22.5 years in prison. The Attorney General’s Office will also lead the prosecution of Kim Potter, the ex-Brooklyn Center officer charged with manslaughter after fatally shooting Daunte Wright. READ MORE: Prosecutors Want Leeway On Sentencing Rules In...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Live video coverage will be allowed in the trial of a former suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in the death of Daunte Wright after the judge overseeing the case reversed herself Tuesday, citing the state of the pandemic. Judge Regina Chu had ruled in August that she would not allow recording or livestreaming of Kim Potter’s trial, which is due to start Nov. 30. Under Minnesota court rules, audio and video coverage of a criminal trial is usually barred unless all parties consent, and Potter has not agreed to it. But a different judge made an exception for the trial earlier this year of ex-Officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd. A coalition of media organizations including The Associated Press made a fresh plea last week for reconsideration, saying “reasonable and meaningful” public and media access to the proceedings requires live coverage under current conditions. Chu issued an order Tuesday granting their request, saying her expectation that COVID-19 would be on the wane by the time the trial starts has not come true. She noted...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) —  A judge entered not guilty pleas on tax evasion charges Friday on behalf of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murder in George Floyd’s death, and for the officer’s ex-wife. Washington County District Judge Sheridan Hawley also set the next court date in the case for Jan. 21. A trial date has not been set. READ MORE: Minneapolis Voters Feel 'Burden' Voting On Future Of PolicingChauvin appeared via Zoom for the brief hearing from the state’s maximum security prison at Oak Park Heights, where he’s serving a 22 1/2-year sentence for his conviction in April for second-degree murder in the May 2020 death of Floyd. The white former officer knelt on Floyd’s neck for 9 1/2 minutes as the Black man pleaded that he couldn’t breathe. Sitting in a prison conference room and wearing a white T-shirt, Chauvin said little except “yes, your honor,” to answer routine questions from the judge. Kellie Chauvin appeared from a different location. READ MORE: Chauvin Trial Jurors: All Three Verdicts Were 'Based On The Evidence And The Facts, 100%'The nine felony tax evasion counts filed in July...
    It’s a worker’s market. The Star Tribune’s Dee Depass reports: “Amid one of the tightest labor markets in U.S. history, employers begin their annual employee-benefits enrollment drives this week with a menu of options designed to get workers to stay and desperately needed job applicants to climb aboard. … Employers across Minnesota and other states are stacking their usual health, dental, vision and 401(k) benefits with fresh perks: tuition reimbursement, more time off, flexible schedules, expanded mental health offerings, day care assistance, remote work options and even a few surprises like pet insurance.” Chauvin back in court. In the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, Iain Carlos and Robin Washington report: “Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murdering George Floyd, is due in court again Friday, this time for a pretrial hearing via Zoom for his separate criminal charges of tax fraud. … Chauvin faces nine charges of tax-related crimes. Among the alleged offenses, Chauvin and his now-former wife are accused of underreporting $464,433 of joint income, including $96,000 he earned between 2014 and 2019 for security work at...
    In their first interview since convicting former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd, seven jurors spoke to CNN about their experience during the trial.  "Race wasn't even ever mentioned in the three and a half weeks that we were in that courtroom, and it was never mentioned during deliberations, I don't believe," juror Sherri Belton Hardeman told host Don Lemon during the interview.Another, Nicole Deters, added that the cause of the trial was ultimately "racism within the system."  "But when it came down to all three verdicts, it was based on the evidence and the facts 100 percent," Deters said.The jurors recalled watching the gruesome video of Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck as Floyd called out for his mother and said he could not breathe.  Belton Hardeman said the footage "is definitely in my spirit and it will always be there." "Watching George Floyd call for his mom just broke my heart. Me being a mom, a Black mom, a Black grandmother. We call out for our mom when we're hurting, when we're in pain, and when we're in need......
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The names of jurors in the Derek Chauvin murder trial will be released Monday after a petition by the media. In a CNN exclusive interview, seven jury members said their guilty verdict in the death of George Floyd was based solely on the evidence. READ MORE: Chauvin Trial Jurors: All Three Verdicts Were 'Based On The Evidence And The Facts, 100%'Now, six months after convicted Chauvin, the names of all twelve jurors and the two alternates will be made public, along with their jury questionnaires. Before Lemon’s interview, two jurors and one alternate had come forward. In an interview with WCCO shortly after the conviction on April 20, juror Brandon Mitchell shared the mental toll sitting in the courtroom had on him, saying that “you’re watching somebody die every day over and over again on video. You’re watching somebody die on instant replay, in real life.” But Mitchell said he felt the responsibility, as a young Black man, to be in the deliberation room. The key testimony for him came from Dr. Martin Tobin, a lung and breathing expert,...
    The jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial denied they felt public pressure to convict the Minneapolis cop who knelt on George Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes, causing him to die. Five jurors and two alternates told CNN’s Don Lemon Tonight on Thursday that race was never mentioned during the jury deliberations and that initially a few of them wanted to acquit Chauvin of third-degree murder. They also described the traumatic experiences of having to watch the video of Floyd’s death repeatedly while trying to come to agreement on a verdict.  Some of the jurors said they were left so scarred emotionally that they needed therapy and were experiencing nightmares. Chauvin, who is white, was convicted of second-degree manslaughter as well as second- and third-degree murder in the death of Floyd, who was black. He is currently serving a 22-and-a-half year prison sentence in a Minnesota penitentiary. Chauvin plans to appeal the verdict. The May 25, 2020 incident in Minneapolis was filmed by a 17-year-old bystander and shared on social media, where it quickly went viral. The video clip ignited...
    (CNN)Months after convicting the former Minneapolis Police officer who murdered George Floyd, jurors describe the trial as a life-altering experience that still haunts them. It was their first and only interview since finding Derek Chauvin guilty in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Seven jury members told CNN's Don Lemon their verdict in the most important trial of the Black Lives Matter era was based solely on the evidence, not their views on race.The gruesome video of Chauvin pressing his knee on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes as the Black man cried out that he couldn't breathe is seared into their minds, they said. Some have sought counseling and therapy."It is definitely in my spirit and it will always be there," Sherri Belton Hardeman said of the video. Read More"Watching George Floyd call for his mom just broke my heart. Me being a mom, a Black mom, a Black grandmother. We call out for our mom when we're hurting, when we're in pain, and when we're in need... And unfortunately his mom could not...
    Five jurors and two alternates in the trial of Derek Chauvin spoke out to CNN’s Don Lemon about how they reached their verdict. Chauvin was found guilty in April for the murder of George Floyd. Sherri Belton Hardeman told Lemon “this was no easy task for us” but that they “took this very seriously.” “People are saying that we were pressured to give that verdict that day… which was not true. We went through everything,” Tossa Edorh added. Nicole Deters agreed that “people need to know that due diligence was done and taken very seriously.” She showed Lemon the copious notes she took during the trial, while Brandon Mitchell said they were “a little bit eager” to meet up with everyone and “get our thoughts out.” Jodi Doud said they took a number of votes during deliberations. Deters explained they all agreed on a guilty verdict for the manslaughter charge, but then “a couple of us played devil’s advocate” to raise questions the defense would point out. Hardeman emphasized they went in this direction to make sure “everyone was on...
    Chauvin jurors speak out. WCCO reports: “Jurors who convicted Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd sat down to share their experience in the courtroom with CNN’s Don Lemon, just days before their names will officially be made public due to a court order. … Judge Peter Cahill’s order will make the names of all 15 jurors public on Nov. 1, along with the written questionnaires from all the 109 potential jurors. The seven jurors who spoke to Lemon said they wanted to do a single interview together, before their identities were released. … Lemon’s interview with the five jurors and two alternates will air Thursday night, and will offer an inside look into how they came to the decision to convict Chauvin on all three counts, their desire to hear from Chauvin himself, and how they worry for their safety after Nov. 1.” Some fine work by the Maple Grove Police Department here. KARE’s Brandon Stahl, A.J. Lagoe and Steve Eckert report: “January 7, 2020, began like any other evening at their Dayton, Minn., home. Faris Hussien sat...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Jurors who convicted Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd sat down to share their experience in the courtroom with CNN’s Don Lemon, just days before their names will officially be made public due to a court order. Judge Peter Cahill’s order will make the names of all 15 jurors public on Nov. 1, along with the written questionnaires from all the 109 potential jurors. The seven jurors who spoke to Lemon said they wanted to do a single interview together, before their identities were released. READ MORE: America 'On Fire': Facebook Watched As Trump Ignited Hate During Unrest In MinneapolisLemon’s interview with the five jurors and two alternates will air Thursday night, and will offer an inside look into how they came to the decision to convict Chauvin on all three counts, their desire to hear from Chauvin himself, and how they worry for their safety after Nov. 1. Lemon also asked how the jurors felt about the racial implications of their decision. “Race wasn’t even mentioned in the three-and-a-half weeks that we were in that courtroom....
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Jurors who convicted Derek Chauvin in the murder of George Floyd sat down to share their experience in the courtroom with CNN’s Don Lemon, just days before their names will officially be made public due to a court order. Judge Peter Cahill’s order will make the names of all 15 jurors public on Nov. 1, along with the written questionnaires from all the 109 potential jurors. The seven jurors who spoke to Lemon said they wanted to do a single interview together, before their identities were released. READ MORE: America 'On Fire': Facebook Watched As Trump Ignited Hate During Unrest In MinneapolisLemon’s interview with the five jurors and two alternates will air Thursday night, and will offer an inside look into how they came to the decision to convict Chauvin on all three counts, their desire to hear from Chauvin himself, and how they worry for their safety after Nov. 1. Lemon also asked how the jurors felt about the racial implications of their decision. “Race wasn’t even mentioned in the three-and-a-half weeks that we were in that courtroom....
    Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn) has blamed Minneapolis police officers for rising crime rates in the city because they are not 'providing the public safety they owe to the citizens they serve'. Omar accused the Minneapolis police department of 'not fulfilling their oath of office' during a town hall event in the city this past weekend, and said that there is 'no accountability' for what the police are doing.  Her comments came just three weeks before the 2021 Minneapolis elections in which voters will tackle a controversial proposal to disband the city's police department and replace it with the Department of Public Safety. Omar's speech was met with incredulity from many commentators who pointed out she had actively campaigned to dismantle the police department and cut its funding.  In December last year, the Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to slash around $8 million in direct police department funding in the wake of the 'defund the police' movement following the death of George Floyd.  Floyd, 46, was killed in May 2020 when Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pressed him down into the...
    Derek Chauvin, the disgraced Minneapolis cop convicted of murdering George Floyd, may regain his freedom sooner than expected, after another officer from the same department had a homicide conviction scrapped last month. Former Minneapolis officer Mohamed Noor, 36, was initially convicted of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the 2017 shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, an unarmed, dual U.S.-Australian citizen and yoga teacher who was engaged to be married, and was sentenced to 12 years in prison in 2019.  She was shot dead after running up to Noor after calling 911 to report what she feared was a rape happening nearby, with the cop later convicted of her killing.  However, that sentence was tossed in September of this year, after Noor's lawyers argued that the third-degree murder charge did not fit the then officer's crime, citing a technicality concerning the specific wording of Noor's murder charge. Legal experts now fear that precedent could be used to challenge Chauvin's April 2021 conviction for the second-degree murder of Floyd in May 2020.   Minneapolis cops Derek Chauvin, 45, and Mohammed Noor, 36, were both convicted of murder...
    The names of at least 14 people and the alternates who sat on the jury that convicted former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd will be released publicly, according to a Monday order from the judge who oversaw the case. The written questionnaires of the 109 possible jurors and the verdict, which the foreperson of the jury signed, will be released Nov. 1, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill said. "On the present record, this Court cannot assay any strong reason to believe the jurors continue to need protection from any external threats to their safety at this point, four months after this Court's sentencing of Chauvin, or that there is a substantial likelihood that making the prospective and impaneled jurors' names public information will interfere with the fair and impartial administration of justice," Cahill said in a statement. NEW YORK CITY OFFICIALS REPORTEDLY MOVE CONVICTED PEDOPHILES INTO HOMELESS SHELTER SURROUNDED BY SCHOOLS Cahill conceded that the soon-to-be-named jurors performed their duties in a trial, which "played out on a stage of unprecedented...
    The judge who oversaw the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted in April of murdering George Floyd, will make public next week the names of 15 jurors and alternates.  In signing his order Monday, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill said the written questionnaires of all 109 potential jurors who were formally evaluated, as well as the verdict form signed by the jury foreperson, will also be made public by Nov. 1, Fox 9 Minneapolis reported.  "On the present record, this Court cannot assay any strong reason to believe the jurors continue to need protection from any external threats to their safety at this point, four months after this Court’s sentencing of Chauvin, or that there is a substantial likelihood that making the prospective and impaneled jurors' names public information will interfere with the fair and impartial administration of justice," Cahill wrote.  DEREK CHAUVIN APPEALS MURDER CONVICTION IN DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD, WILL REPRESENT HIMSELF  Though the judge did also acknowledge the jurors were called upon to carry out their duties in a case that "played out...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge who oversaw the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin said Monday that he will make the names of 15 jurors and alternates who sat in the courtroom public next week. Judge Peter Cahill’s order said he will make the list of jurors public on Nov. 1. The written questionnaires of all 109 potential jurors who were formally evaluated will also be made public.. READ MORE: Derek Chauvin Hires Lawyer For AppealChauvin, who is white, was convicted in April of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years for kneeling on Floyd’s neck for 9 1/2 minutes as the Black man said he couldn’t breathe. Cahill initially kept the names of the jurors sealed, citing the high-profile nature of the case, and had ordered that their identities remain secret for at least 180 days after the verdict. A media coalition, which includes The Associated Press, had asked Cahill to release the jurors’ identities, saying the media and public have a right to the...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge who oversaw the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin said Monday that he will make the names of 15 jurors and alternates who sat in the courtroom public next week. Judge Peter Cahill’s order said he will make the list of jurors public on Nov. 1. The written questionnaires of all 109 potential jurors who were formally evaluated will also be made public.. Chauvin, who is white, was convicted in April of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years for kneeling on Floyd’s neck for 9 1/2 minutes as the Black man said he couldn’t breathe. Cahill initially kept the names of the jurors sealed, citing the high-profile nature of the case, and had ordered that their identities remain secret for at least 180 days after the verdict. A media coalition, which includes The Associated Press, had asked Cahill to release the jurors’ identities, saying the media and public have a right to the information and...
    (CNN)The Minneapolis Police Department's top homicide detective testified that kneeling on George Floyd's neck after he had been handcuffed was "totally unnecessary," saying that "if your knee is on someone's neck -- that could kill them."Lt. Richard Zimmerman, head of the homicide division for more than 12 years, testified Friday that Derek Chauvin's actions violated policy by pressing his weight down on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes while the man was handcuffed and in a prone position. Police are not trained to kneel on a person's neck, he said. "Once the person is cuffed, the threat level goes down all the way," the lieutenant told jurors at Chauvin's murder trial. "How can that person hurt you?" he asked, adding that "you getting injured is way down." Keeping the person handcuffed and in a prone position "restricts their breathing," he said. Asked by prosecutor Matthew Frank if he was ever trained to kneel on a person, Zimmerman said no. Read More"Because if your knee is on someone's neck -- that could kill them," the lieutenant said. Chauvin at that...
    (CNN)The Derek Chauvin trial is technically the second trial in my lifetime to be at once ubiquitous and hugely consequential. I was a newborn during the first. A jury acquitted O.J. Simpson of murdering his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman on October 3, 1995, two weeks after I was born. The outcome divided the nation along racial lines -- nearly 75% of White Americans believed Simpson was guilty at the time of the verdict, compared to roughly 20% of Black Americans. The trial was a wrestling match over the particularities of the case -- the infamous glove, phone recording and forensic evidence -- but also so much more. It was about celebrity, culpability and consequence. It bore the weight of race, discrimination and a local police department that acted as enemy combatants in Black neighborhoods. Most of all, it bore the weight of Rodney King. Cole Brown The King trial in 1992 was strikingly similar to this week's Chauvin trial. It centered on police violence and videotape -- the recording in that case was of L.A....
    (CNN)First there was the agonizing video, showing Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin grinding his knee into George Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes as three of his colleagues watched and didn't intervene. Then came the protests, a national wave of outrage coursing through communities large and small. Now the nation is watching Chauvin's trial, underway in a Minnesota courtroom -- nearly 10 months after Floyd's death. It's a chance for the wheels of justice to finally turn. And it's a moment to ask ourselves:If another officer were to engage in similar misconduct today, would his colleagues again refuse to step in and stop it?We serve together on the Council on Criminal Justice Task Force on Policing -- a Georgia police chief and a parent who founded Mothers Against Police Brutality after her son was killed by police in 2013. Not surprisingly, we don't see eye-to-eye on everything. But like our nine task force colleagues, we do agree on what's needed to ensure officers don't stand idly by as tragedies like Floyd's death unfold. Why I cant watch the Derek Chauvin...
    (CNN)Not every piece of evidence presented in a criminal trial is relevant to its outcome. Over the course of the trial of former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin thus far, we have heard a number of witness statements that are irrelevant to the central legal matter at issue in the case: is Chauvin legally responsible, under Minnesota's murder statute, for the death of George Floyd? Elliot WilliamsThe defense could have objected to some of this witness testimony or the judge could have easily struck it down, but they didn't. And that's a good thing.Under Minnesota law, which governs Chauvin's trial, "relevance" is a term that doesn't track with our colloquial understanding of the term. "Relevant evidence" there is defined as "having any tendency to make the existence of any fact that is of consequence to the determination of the action more probable or less probable than it would be without the evidence." This is a nebulous concept, but it means that to be admissible in court, evidence must prove or disprove a fact that is of consequence to the...
    By Steve Karnowski and Amy Fortliti | Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS — A Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot an unarmed woman after she called 911 to report a possible rape happening behind her home was sentenced Thursday to nearly five years in prison — the most the judge could impose but less than half the 12½ years he was sentenced to for his murder conviction that was overturned last month. Mohamed Noor was initially convicted of third-degree murder and manslaughter in the 2017 fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a 40-year-old dual U.S.-Australian citizen and yoga teacher who was engaged to be married. But the Minnesota Supreme Court tossed out Noor’s murder conviction and sentence last month, saying the third-degree murder statute didn’t fit the case because it can only apply when a defendant shows a “generalized indifference to human life,” not when the conduct is directed at a particular person, as it was with Damond. Judge Kathryn Quaintance, who also presided at Noor’s trial, granted prosecutors’ request to impose the maximum sentence in state guidelines on Noor’s manslaughter...
    No improvement in the COVID-19 numbers. The Star Tribune’s Jeremy Olson reports: “The tail end of the latest national pandemic wave continued to worsen in Minnesota, where more than 1,000 people with COVID-19 filled inpatient hospital beds and the new infection rate remained seventh worst among states. … Health officials on Monday urged more people to seek new or booster doses of COVID-19 vaccine when eligible to slow the spread of the coronavirus. While breakthrough infections continued to increase among fully vaccinated Minnesotans, health officials said the vaccine remains highly effective at preventing the worst outcomes.” Related: “Gov. Walz announces ‘Kids Deserve a Shot’ Vaccine Incentive Program” [WDIO] Bus shelter crash. KSTP report:s “A grand opening for a bus station along Interstate 35W in Minneapolis has been postponed Monday. … The event was postponed following a deadly crash in the area over the weekend. … The Minnesota State Patrol reported the crash happened Saturday around 7:40 p.m. when a vehicle heading north exited into the transit station at Lake Street and crashed.… State patrol initially reported two deaths but then...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Derek Chauvin has hired an attorney to represent him as he appeals his murder conviction in the death of George Floyd, according to court documents made public Monday. Attorney William Mohrman filed a document with the court Friday saying he would represent Chauvin in his appeal. Chauvin was convicted in April on state charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s 2020 death. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison. Chauvin filed documents last month saying he intends to appeal his conviction and sentence on 14 grounds, including that he believes his trial should have been moved from Hennepin County and that the jury should have been sequestered. He asked for a public defender to represent him on appeal, but the state Supreme Court denied that request this month, saying a review of his assets and debts showed he was ineligible. When Chauvin made the request, he said he had no income aside from nominal prison wages and that the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association’s legal defense fund, which paid...
    Disgraced Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has tapped a new attorney to handle the appeal of his conviction in April, when he was found guilty in the death of George Floyd, according to court documents released Monday.  Attorney William Mohrman filed a document with the court Friday saying he would represent Chauvin in his appeal. Chauvin was convicted in April on state charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s 2020 death. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison. Chauvin filed documents last month saying he intends to appeal his conviction and sentence on 14 grounds, including that he believes his trial should have been moved from Hennepin County and that the jury should have been sequestered. VideoDEREK CHAUVIN DENIED REQUEST FOR PUBLIC DEFENDER IN APPEALS PROCESS BY MINNESOTA SUPREME COURT Separately, Chauvin is also charged in federal court with violating Floyd’s civil rights when he knelt on the Black man’s neck for about 9 1/2 minutes as Floyd was facedown on the pavement, not resisting and pleading for air. He has pleaded not guilty...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Derek Chauvin has hired an attorney to represent him as he appeals his murder conviction in the death of George Floyd, according to court documents made public Monday. Attorney William Mohrman filed a document with the court Friday saying he would represent Chauvin in his appeal. Chauvin was convicted in April on state charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s 2020 death. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison. Chauvin filed documents last month saying he intends to appeal his conviction and sentence on 14 grounds, including that he believes his trial should have been moved from Hennepin County and that the jury should have been sequestered. He asked for a public defender to represent him on appeal, but the state Supreme Court denied that request this month, saying a review of his assets and debts showed he was ineligible. When Chauvin made the request, he said he had no income aside from nominal prison wages and that the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association’s legal defense fund,...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Thursday would have been George Floyd‘s 48th birthday. Family and friends plan to honor his life and impact near the intersection where he died. A celebration is happening at George Floyd Square in south Minneapolis. There will be food, music and a candlelight vigil. Festivities start at 5 p.m. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murdering Floyd in April. Chauvin, who is white, knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly 10 minutes on May 25, 2020, even as widely-seen bystander video showed Floyd, who was Black, pleading for air. The case fueled a national reckoning on racism and police brutality. Three other former officers — J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao — are also charged in Floyd’s death. Their trial is scheduled for March.   More On WCCO.com: Roseville Elementary Principal Brian Koland Dies By Suicide Naked Female At Denver International Airport Walked Around Concourse A Asking Passengers ‘Where Are You From?’ ‘It Was Unbelievable’: Hunter Bags 600-Pound Bear In Western Wisconsin ‘I’ve Been Targeted’: Proctor High School Football Coach Resigns...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Two of the Minneapolis police officers recorded on recently-released body camera video making disparaging comments about protesters in the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder are no longer on the force. The Minneapolis Police Department confirmed to WCCO-TV that Lt. Johnny Mercil left the department on May 3 and Cmdr. Bruce Folks left on July 31. In the body camera footage, which was released earlier this week, Mercil is heard saying that he thought a group of protesters was white because “there’s not looting and fires,” The Star Tribune reported. Folkens made comments about “hunting people” after curfew during the nights of unrest. RELATED: Body Cam Footage Of Minneapolis Officers During Unrest Released After Trial: ‘We’re Hunting Activists!’ Mercil also testified in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murdering George Floyd on May 25, 2020. Chauvin, who is white, knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly 10 minutes, even as the Black man pleaded for air. While on the stand, Mercil said that he trained Chauvin, noting that the neck...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Court of Appeals said Friday that Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murdering George Floyd, must hire a lawyer before he can make oral arguments in his appeal. In an order, Judge Matthew Johnson wrote that oral arguments are not be permitted for the ex-officer because he is not represented in his appeal. READ MORE: Florida Man Guilty Of Threatening Derek Chauvin's Attorney“If [Chauvin] later obtains counsel, however, he may file a motion with this court requesting oral argument,” the judge wrote. This development comes just days after the Minnesota Supreme Court upheld the denial of Chauvin’s request for a public defender. When the former officer, who is currently serving a 22-and-a-half year sentence for third-degree murder, filed his appeal last month, he requested “pauper status,” which would have exempted him from having to pay court costs and filing fees. READ MORE: Minn. Supreme Court Upholds Denial Of Public Defender For Derek Chauvin's AppealHennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill initially denied Chauvin’s request. After the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors are seeking approval for a more severe penalty than what is outlined in state guidelines if a former suburban Minneapolis police officer is convicted in the shooting death of Daunte Wright. Former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter is facing charges of first- and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Wright, who was shot while he was trying to drive away from officers during a traffic stop in April. The sentencing guidelines for first-degree manslaughter range from 6 to 81/2 years in prison. Potter has pleaded not guilty. She is scheduled to stand trial in December. The move is similar to one made by Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer convicted in George Floyd’s death. In that case, a judge approved Ellison’s request for an upward departure because Floyd was particularly vulnerable and Chauvin abused his authority as a police officer. Ellison wrote in a court document filed Wednesday that Potter “caused a greater-than-normal danger to the safety of other people” because she fired into...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The George Floyd Global Memorial nonprofit announced its plans for a fundraiser and community event to celebrate what would have been George Floyd’s 48th birthday. The event is set to take place at George Floyd Square between the intersections of 38th and Chicago Avenue South in Minneapolis on Oct. 14. READ MORE: Federal Prosecutors Not Filing Charges Against Officer In Jacob Blake ShootingGFGM organizers say their purpose for the commemoration is to bring members of the community, board members of the nonprofit, and friends and family of the Floyds together. “As we approach what would have been my nephew George Floyd’s birthday, we acknowledge that it’s time to focus on the impact his life has made on the world, beyond the tragedy of his death,” said Angela Harrelson, George Floyd’s aunt who lives in Minneapolis and serves as co-chair for the George Floyd Global Memorial.  “On this birthday, we want to bring the community together to reflect on what he meant to those of us who knew him and now, how he’s helping to change the lives of so many following...
    MIAMI (AP) — A Florida man has pleaded guilty to threatening to kill a lawyer who represented the former Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd. William John Hartnett made the threat in a phone call from Miami on April 6, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release Thursday. READ MORE: Minn. Supreme Court Upholds Denial Of Public Defender For Derek Chauvin's AppealHartnett, 42, faces a maximum of five years in prison at his sentencing Dec. 15. He pleaded guilty to one count of transmitting a threat through interstate communications. Eric Nelson (credit: CBS) READ MORE: George Floyd Memorial Statue In NYC Vandalized AgainProsecutors said Hartnett called the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association, which was paying for ex-officer Derek Chauvin’s defense. The 18-second message included several obscenity-laden threats against Eric Nelson, Chauvin’s defense lawyer. Chauvin was convicted in April of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter for killing Floyd, a Black man, by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes in May 2020. Floyd’s death sparked...
    MIAMI (AP) — A Florida man has pleaded guilty to threatening to kill a lawyer who represented the former Minneapolis police officer convicted in the death of George Floyd. William John Hartnett made the threat in a phone call from Miami on April 6, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release Thursday. Hartnett, 42, faces a maximum of five years in prison at his sentencing Dec. 15. He pleaded guilty to one count of transmitting a threat through interstate communications. Prosecutors said Hartnett called the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association, which was paying for ex-officer Derek Chauvin’s defense. The 18-second message included several obscenity-laden threats against Eric Nelson, Chauvin’s defense lawyer. Chauvin was convicted in April of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter for killing Floyd, a Black man, by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes in May 2020. Floyd’s death sparked protests nationwide and calls for police reforms intended to reduce confrontation and violence. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,...
    Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was denied his request for a public defender by the Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday as he appeals his conviction and 22 1/2-year sentence for the murder of George Floyd.  Chauvin previously said the only money he has are prison wages when he filed an appeal on his own behalf last month asking for a delay in the process until he could get a public defender. The Office of the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender previously determined that Chauvin was ineligible.  Chauvin said the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association’s legal defense fund paid for his legal fees during his trial but was no longer obligated after his conviction.  The justices on Wednesday reviewed his debts and assets and found he had not established that he was entitled to a public defender, Chief Justice Lorie Gildea wrote. He may seek a public defender in the future if he's unable to pay for a lawyer, the court said. DEREK CHAUVIN APPEALS MURDER CONVICTION IN DEATH OF GEORGE FLOYD, WILL REPRESENT HIMSELF  Defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant,...
    Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin will have to pay for his own attorney when appealing his murder conviction and sentence in the death of George Floyd, the Minnesota Supreme Court has ruled. Last month, when Chauvin filed his appeal to overturn previous convictions of second and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, documents reveal that he filed for a pauper status, claiming he was $142,000 in debt and in need of a public defender. “I do not have a sufficient source of income, besides nominal prison wages, which are being used to pay off fees from the above captioned case,” Chauvin wrote. “My only assets are two retirement accounts. If I take funds from said accounts, I will be significantly penalized and the remained will likely be taken to pay off debts. I also owe the IRS about $60,000 and the State about $37,000.” In this April 20, 2021, file photo, people take part in a rally in Los Angeles after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the 2020 death of George...
    The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday denied Derek Chauvin’s request for a public defender, as the former Minneapolis police officer prepares to appeal his murder conviction in the death of George Floyd. Chief Justice Lorie Gildea signed an order that said Chauvin failed to prove that he qualifies for representation from a public defender, according to the Star Tribune. The court determined that Chauvin did not illustrate that he was too poor to pay for a private attorney. Gildea did not, however, reveal further details regarding his assets or debts, according to the Star Tribune. The chief justice wrote in the order, citing state law, that a defendant is considered too poor to provide their own lawyer if “the defendant, through any combination of liquid assets and current income” is not able to finance their own attorney. The former police officer claimed in an affidavit that he has no earnings other than nominal prison wages he has received, according to The Associated Press. He contended that his debts are larger than his assets. Chauvin also said he does not currently have legal representation...
    Another Chauvin loss in court. WCCO reports: “The Minnesota Supreme Court has upheld the denial of Derek Chauvin’s request for a public defender to represent him in the appeal of his murder conviction. … Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd’s death on Memorial Day of 2020. He was sentenced to 22-and-a-half years in prison. … When Chauvin filed his appeal last month, he also sought ‘pauper status,’ which would have exempted him from having to pay court costs and filing fees. That motion was denied.” Yellow cards, red cards … and vaccination cards. KARE’s Dana Thiede reports: “The Red Loons and Dark Clouds are crazy about the Minnesota United Football Club (MNUFC) professional soccer team, but a disagreement over COVID-19 vaccination policies could keep the ardent supporters away from Allianz Field. … Both fan groups released statements Tuesday saying they recently held a meeting with Minnesota United’s CEO, COO and Field Manager, asking MNUFC to require either proof of vaccination or a negative COVID...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday denied former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin’s request to have a public defender represent him as he appeals his murder conviction and sentence in the death of George Floyd. The state’s high court said Chauvin has not established that he is entitled to public defender. The justices made that decision after reviewing information about Chauvin’s debts and assets, as well as the Office of the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender’s prior determination that Chauvin was ineligible, Chief Justice Lorie Gildea wrote. Chauvin may seek a public defender in the future if he’s unable to pay for a lawyer, the Supreme Court said. Chauvin filed documents last month saying he intends to appeal his conviction and sentence on 14 grounds, including that his trial should have been moved from Hennepin County and the jury should have been sequestered. Chauvin also filed an affidavit saying he has no attorney in the appeals process, and has no income aside from nominal prison wages. The Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association’s legal...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Supreme Court has upheld the denial of Derek Chauvin’s request for a public defender to represent him in the appeal of his murder conviction. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd’s death on Memorial Day of 2020. He was sentenced to 22-and-a-half years in prison. READ MORE: George Floyd Memorial Statue In NYC Vandalized AgainWhen Chauvin filed his appeal last month, he also sought “pauper status,” which would have exempted him from having to pay court costs and filing fees. That motion was denied. He applied for a public defender on the grounds “his debts currently exceed his limited assets.” The Office of the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender ruled him ineligible, and after reviewing his financial information, the Supreme Court agreed. “We conclude that Chauvin has not established that he is entitled to appointed representation at this time,” Chief Justice Lorie Gildea wrote. READ MORE: Derek Chauvin Files His Own Appeal Of Conviction, Sentence In George Floyd's MurderEric Nelson represented...
    A STATUE of George Floyd has been vandalized in New York City. This marks the second statue of Floyd to be hit in the city since June. 2A statue of George Floyd by artist Chris Carnabuci was vandalized Sunday morningCredit: Splash News Who is George Floyd? On May 25, 2020, George Floyd was arrested and killed by officers of the Minneapolis police department after a convenience store employee reported him for buying a pack of cigarettes with an alleged counterfeit $20 bill. Former officer, Derek Chauvin, kneeled on Floyd's back and neck at the time of arrest in an attempt of restraint. Chauvin continued to kneel for nine minutes and 29 seconds, resulting in the untimely death of Floyd. A viral video recorded at the time of the arrest shows Chauvin kneeling on Floyd as Floyd repeats the phrase "I can't breathe." His cause of death was ruled as homicide, a result of cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint, and neck compression according to Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office. Most read in NewsNASCAR SLAYING...