Sunday, Dec 05, 2021 - 20:33:57
286 results - (0.532 seconds)

in the cost:

latest news at page 1:
    A woman who resides in rural Alaska is lifting the lid on what it's really like to live in a remote part of the state, where moose are her neighbors and a half-gallon of milk costs $18.  Emily, who is known as @emilyinalaska_ on TikTok, has been documenting the highs and lows of life in south-central Alaska after joining the social media platform last year during the coronavirus pandemic.  She went viral a few weeks ago when she shared a video revealing the astronomical prices tags found on common grocery store items, leaving viewers stunned by the markup.   Scroll down for video   Behind-the-scenes: Emily, who is known as @emilyinalaska_ on TikTok, has been documenting the highs and lows of life in south-central Alaska for over a year Yikes: She went viral a few weeks ago when she revealed the cost of groceries in rural Alaska. A block of Tillamook is $24.99 and a half-gallon of Darigold milk is $18.29 Pricey: A pack of Land O’Frost honey smoked turkey breast is $10.29 at her local store  'Goods are priced higher since they...
    Utah’s demolition of third-ranked Oregon did more than knock the Pac-12 out of the playoff race. It eliminated all hope of the conference sending a second team to the major New Year’s bowls. In addition to enhancing the Pac-12’s reputation, a second New Year’s Six participant would have generated millions of dollars in postseason revenue for the collective that was not included in campus budget projections. Free cash, an enhanced profile, berths in multiple major bowls — and it was blasted to smithereens as the Utes trampled the two-time defending conference champions. How might have the situation played out? There were two paths to a windfall: 1) Oregon in the College Football Playoff. Had the Ducks won out, their berth in the semifinals would have resulted in a $6 million paycheck for the conference split equally among the schools. (Oregon’s travel expenses would have been covered separately by the CFP.) Meanwhile, a second team — most likely Utah — would have filled the Pac-12’s spot in the Rose Bowl opposite the Big...
    The most expensive item over the first half-decade of President Joe Biden’s climate and social spending legislation is a tax cut for the wealthy. The Democratic Build Back Better Act, which passed the House on Friday morning, raises the current $10,000 cap on federal tax deductions for state and local taxes to $80,000, a move that leads to a significant tax cut for high earners in states with high taxes. The provision dwarfs many of the other priorities in the legislation and was included under pressure from a vocal contingent of Democrats from high-tax blue states. The nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget said that increasing the SALT cap to $80,000 through 2025 would end up costing the federal government $275 billion in revenue — an amount that is $5 billion more than the next costliest provision in the Build Back Better Act. COST OF DEMOCRATIC SPENDING BILL WOULD DOUBLE IF TEMPORARY PROVISIONS EXTENDED, BUDGET WATCHDOG SAYS The Joint Committee on Taxation estimated Friday that the SALT cap change in the bill that...
    STEVENSON, Md. (WJZ) — If you’re hosting Thanksgiving dinner, get ready to crack open your wallet. This year is expected to be one of the most expensive in the history of the holiday. Thanksgiving is a little over a week away and if you don’t yet have your turkey, it’s not going to be impossible to find one but you should just expect to pay a little more. READ MORE: Priest Assaulted, Robbed At Gunpoint, Outside Of St. Leo's Roman Catholic ChurchAt carriage house farms, in Stevenson Gaylord Clark tends to his flock pasture raised turkeys. “These birds benefit from being outdoors, they benefit from the grass, they benefit from the worms, the dirt the whole nine yard,” said Clark. At $7.25 a pound the price reflects the amount of work it takes to raise them. “There’s a humongous amount of work that goes into this operation and it’s extremely costly to operate,”  Clark said. Over the past year, that cost has gone up. READ MORE: Ex-Baltimore County Police Officer Wanted In Pennsylvania, Accused Of Abducting Children“Feed is going up,...
    On Monday’s broadcast of CNN’s “Situation Room,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki responded to inflationary concerns about the Build Back Better reconciliation bill by arguing that inflation increases cost and the bill will lower the costs of child care, health care, and housing and economists say the plan will help inflation in the long term. Host Wolf Blitzer asked, “Should that spending plan, though, be delayed, Jen, until next year, given that inflation here in the United States has now risen to a 30-year high?” Psaki responded, “Well, first, Wolf, inflation, which is something we certainly watch closely and any cost increase for the American people is something that’s of concern to the president. But what this bill will do is lower costs, and the way inflation impacts people at home is it increases costs of, whether it’s goods or housing or health care. And what this bill does is it lowers costs. It’s going to cut the cost of child care. It’s going to cut the cost of health care. For people out there who rely on insulin,...
    White House chief of staff Ron Klain has defended Joe Biden and his administration as the presidents approval ratings continues to fall amid rapidly rising inflation and a 'cost of living' crisis. Polling from Monmouth University suggests confidence in the president is in short supply and dwindling with 42 per cent saying they are unsure of the president's ability to rescue the economy in the aftermath of COVID-19.  The figures are 12 per cent lower than when Biden took office in January when his approval rating sat at 54 percent.  White House chief of staff Ron Klain, pictured, has defended several crises afflicting the Biden administration including rising inflation, high unemployment and supply chain issues 'Things are a lot better in this country than they were a year ago with regard to covid, with regard to the economy but we have a lot of work left to do and I think voters are in a "show me, don't tell me" mode,' Klain told Jake Tapper, seen left, on CNN WH Chief of Staff Ron Klain: "Things are a lot better in...
    As America's wealth gap continues to widen at an unprecedented rate, the Biden administration is looking to implement strategies and legislation to combat the ongoing problem. According to The Washington Post, new legislation has been proposed by House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) along with Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.). Their newly proposed policies would be focused on addressing racial and ethnic disparities that have created barriers for employment, fair and substantial income, wealth acquisition, and access to credit. So, what is the proposed solution to the problem? It appears to start with acknowledging that there is, in fact, a problem. Speaking to The Post on Tuesday, Chiraag Bains, who serves as deputy director for racial justice and equity under the Biden administration, insisted that resolving the issue begins with recognizing its root. He noted that "the Biden administration recognizes 'the racial wealth gap has direct roots in discriminatory federal, state and local policies.'" Bains also indicated that the president's plan involves using "the administration's vast purchasing power to increase government contracting...
    Morsa Images | DigitalVision | Getty Images The standard premium for Medicare's outpatient care coverage will jump by 14.5% for 2022, far outpacing an earlier estimate of 6.7%, according to the government. The standard premium for Part B, which covers outpatient care and durable equipment, will be $170.10 next year, up $21.60 from $148.50 this year, said a senior official for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Friday. The program's trustees had estimated this summer that the premium would rise to $158.50. The deductible for Part B will be $233, up $30 (14.8%) from this year.VIDEO1:4301:43Social Security COLA in 2022: How much more money you will see in your checkInvest in You: Ready. Set. Grow.The bigger-than-anticipated increase is partly attributed to rising prices and utilization across the health care system and congressional action that limited the increase in the 2021 Part B premium. Additionally, contingency reserves have been increased to account for potential new treatment costs incurred by the program. Meanwhile, the deductible for Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) per benefit period (which generally starts when you are...
    ronnachaipark | iStock | Getty Images You're not imagining the growing pinch to your budget from the cost of your workplace health insurance. Over the last decade, family premiums for employer-sponsored coverage have jumped 47%, according to a report from the Kaiser Family Foundation. That rate outpaces both wage growth (31%) and inflation (23%) over the same time period. Annual premiums for family coverage this year reached an average $22,221, with workers contributing an average $5,969 toward the cost and employers paying the rest, the report says. The amount is 4% more than 2020.VIDEO13:2813:28Why major health insurance companies are getting into dental insuranceHealth InsuranceDeductibles — amounts that you pay out of pocket for services before your insurance starts paying — also have jumped 68.4% since 2011, to an average $1,669 from $991. This year, 85% of covered workers have a deductible in their plan, up from 74% a decade ago. At companies with under 200 employees, average deductibles are 70% higher than those at larger firms ($2,379 vs. $1,397). Roughly 155 million people rely on employer-sponsored coverage, according to Kaiser's...
    BRITS are costing the NHS £350,000 per YEAR by shoving random objects in their anuses, a report reveals. Beer bottles, toothbrushes, carrots and wine corks are just some of the items reported over the years. 3Care to guess where this person got an aerosol can stuck? This report on Radiopaedia said "aerosol cans are a relatively common improvised rectal foreign body"Credit: Radiopaedia.org An analysis by medics at Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust aimed to uncover the financial burden to the country. They calculated the “number of rectal foreign bodies that required removal in hospital” between 2010 and 2019. A total of 3,500 objects were removed from the back passage over the course of nine years. The cost of anaesthetics, bed occupancy and more has totalled the NHS £3 million over the same period. Men were almost always (85 per cent) the patients, said the report published in the Royal College of Surgeons of England Annals. And oldies were just as into it as youngsters, with one in six patients over the age of 60.  The authors of the paper said...
    A treasure-hunter who got lost in a grizzly bear-filled part of Yellowstone while hunting for a tycoon's gold has been ordered to pay the $2,880 it cost to rescue him by helicopter.  Mark Lantis, 48, was ordered to pay the National Park Service the cost of the flight at an appelate ruling earlier this month while searching for Forrest Fenn's treasure.  The oil worker's unsuccessful search started on August 2, 2018, after his mother drove and dropped him off at the trailhead for Mount Holmes in Wyoming. There, Lantis - who was living with his mom at the time - hoped to find gold hidden by Fenn, an antiquities collector whose 2010 memoir, titled The Thrill of The Chase, included clues to what he claimed was a treasure worth at least $1 million. According to court documents, Lantis had only packed a day's worth of clothing and didn't bring any food. He wore 'a T-shirt, jeans, a light windbreaker and tennis shoes,' and carried a small backpack with water. Although he did not bring any food, he carried several cans of...
    Rapper Travis Scott says he'll cover the funeral costs for the eight people killed during a violent crowd surge at his Astroworld Festival as he's hit with a slew of lawsuits from surviving victims who accuse him of causing 'extreme distress'. A number of injury lawyers, including famed civil rights attorney Ben Crump, are claiming that Scott, Live Nation and other parties behind the festival failed to provide the necessary security measures to prevent the stampede that injured hundreds of people, in addition to the eight fatalities. As 11 more lawsuits poured in on Monday, Scott pledged to cover all funeral costs and announced that he will be partnering with BetterHelp to supply free one-on-one online therapy to any concertgoers impacted by the tragic events at Astroworld. He will also refund the cost of all tickets. But attendees and their lawyers, including Crump – who is representing Noah Gutierrez, 21 – said that the tragedy was 'years in the making' because of a history of injuries reported at Scott's performances, including three hospitalizations at the same event in 2019. The...
    Glasgow, Scotland (CNN)TGIF! It's been a long week at the COP26 climate conference, where Friday's theme was about the impact of climate change on future generations.The focus, therefore, turned away from the suits and briefcases in the conference venue to the city center, where thousands of kids and young adults wanted to make sure their voices were heard by marching though Glasgow.Here's what happened Friday.'Green wash festival'Young activists poured into Glasgow from all over the world to demand from leaders at a Fridays for Future demonstration.Generation Climate: How the crisis made young people the adults in the roomRead MoreGreta Thunberg headlined the event and called the COP26 summit a "global north green wash festival," and said "it should be obvious that we cannot solve a crisis with the same methods that got us into it in the first place."But while Thunberg was the most anticipated guest at the event, there were many other equally passionate speakers that took the stage, many sharing their personal experiences with the crisis. Young Filipino climate advocate Jan Karmel Guillermo told crowds the summit was...
    The COVID-19 pandemic cost the world millions of years of human life, with the United States being among the countries struck hardest, a new study finds. Researchers from the University of Oxford in the UK used excess death data and historical age of death trends to estimate how many total years of life were lost in 31 countries in 2020. The U.S., much of Europe, and Asian countries such as Israel, South Korea and Taiwan, and a few others like Chile and New Zealand were included. The researchers determined that Russia, Bulgaria, Lithuania and the U.S. lost the most years of life between them. Across all 31 countries, 28 million total years of life were lost due to the pandemic. Researchers found that the U.S. was among the countries that suffered the most total years of life lost, with around 3,500 years of life lost for every 100,000 people (above). Other leaders included Russia, Bulgaria and Lithuania. In total, 28 million years of life were lost across 31 countries included in the study On average, men suffered a larger drop...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden and congressional Democratic leaders have slashed the size of the party's sweeping spending package in half to woo Sen. Joe Manchin. Yet, the West Virginia lawmaker is still throwing up red flags about the size of the proposal and the measures that would pay for it.Accusing his colleagues of playing "shell games" and including "budget gimmicks," Manchin said Monday that "the real cost" of the $1.75 trillion bill would be almost twice that amount if its provisions were extended or made permanent. And he said he won't support it without knowing how it would "impact our debt and our economy and our country."Manchin is fuming over one of the main ways the Democrats shrunk the package, which originally totaled $3.5 trillion over 10 years. They shortened the duration of several measures, thereby reducing their cost. For instance, the enhanced child tax credit would be extended for only one additional year, instead of four. The beefed-up Affordable Care Act subsidies would continue only through 2025, instead of being made permanent.It's a technique used by both Republicans and Democrats,...
    President Joe Biden's proposals to reduce methane emissions in the US have been released, revealing an ambitious combination of new regulations and voluntary initiatives. The proposal announced Tuesday centers largely on the oil and gas industry, which the Environmental Protection Agency says accounts for about 30 percent of all methane emissions in the US. Industry analysts say that the impact on oil supply and prices will likely be minimal, and the petroleum industry has greeted the plan with a cautiously positive attitude, indicating it is willing to work with the administration to finalize the plan. Though the plan does not include a topline cost for taxpayers, it relies on at least $16 billion budgeted in the infrastructure bill currently stuck in Congress to cap abandoned mines and oil wells. Republicans and small oil and gas firms have said Biden's plan lead to skyrocketing energy bills, companies going out of business and unnecessary burdens on the industries. They also believe the restrictions are 'onerous', will hurt everyday Americans when gas prices are at a seven-year high, and will benefit OPEC+ countries...
    ATU Images | The Image Bank | Getty Images A major expansion of Medicare that Democrats proposed as part of the Build Back Better initiative is in danger of being trimmed or even taken out of the legislation as lawmakers scramble to make a deal. In their original $3.5 trillion budget proposal, Democrats included a revision of Medicare that would add coverage for dental, hearing and vision. The plan was expected to cost around $350 billion over a decade. But now, those parts of the expansion may be dropped as lawmakers look to trim the overall cost and rework pieces of the legislation to appease centrist Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz. More from Invest in You:Nearly 1 in 3 Americans will take on debt this holiday seasonHow much house can you afford? Here's what you need to knowHere's the budget this millennial used to save $100,000 by age 25 "About the expansions — we are negotiating and talking about that," Manchin told CNN Wednesday, adding that he's concerned about the country's deficit and pending insolvency...
    Thanksgiving of 2021 may “be the most expensive meal in the history of the holiday,” the New York Times wrote Monday about inflationary prices American families will absorb to celebrate the holiday first commemorated by the Pilgrims in 1621. “I can buy that this will be the most expensive Thanksgiving ever, but there’s an income-inequality story here that matters a lot,” agricultural economist at Michigan State University Trey Malone told the Times. “The rich are going to be spending more on Thanksgiving than they have ever spent before, but not everyone is going to be able to do that.” Indeed, Calvin Moore, the Congressional Leadership Fund communications director, a super PAC with close connections to the House Republican leadership, told Breitbart News that Biden’s policies have created a situation in which “working families can’t even afford to celebrate the holidays this year.” “Family budgets are being pushed to the brink, and voters will quit House Democrats cold turkey because of it,” Moore said. The Times noted many grocery items have increased in cost since Donald Trump held the Oval Office. American worker Caroline Hoffman said...
    This year’s Thanksgiving feast is biting back as the ongoing supply chain crisis causes some holiday favorites to balloon in price, with turkeys now 27 per cent more expensive.  Nearly every dinnertime staple – from the popular roasting bird to pumpkins – have jumped in price year-over-year, leaving consumers with a heftier tab. The price of a frozen 15-pound turkey will cost around $21.50 this year, up 27% from last year’s $16.95 price tag. A three-pound bag of Russet potatoes cost $1.12 last week, a 13% year-over-year spike from the previous $0.99 cost, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). Other Thanksgiving standbys – including bread, beverages, carrots and more – are also more expensive ahead of the November 25 holiday. The supply chain crisis has driven up prices across the spectrum, as port backlogs slow deliveries, labor shortages drive up wages, and demand for food rises. The price of a frozen 15-pound turkey will cost around $21.50 this year, up 27% from last year’s Supply chain-driven disruptions helped drive up the prices of of vegetables, booze, bread,...
    DENVER (CBS4) – The Dumb Friends League is overflowing with more adoptable animals than they have seen in a decade. (credit: CBS) A number of factors have contributed to the numbers, including financial reasons like people moving out of state. People can adopt adult cats for only $10 through the end of the month at the Malone Center Shelter in Denver or the Buddy Center Shelter in Castle Rock, and there are discounts on other normal fees. If you can’t keep an animal permanently, you can also help out the Dumb Friends League by becoming a foster owner.
    THE USA’s travel restrictions end next month for fully vaxxed visitors. Here are our top tips for where to visit when you go across the pond. 6As the USA's travel ban ends next month for fully vaxxed visitors, we share our top tips for when you go across the pondCredit: Getty Images 6At Universal Orlando Resort, you’ll feel like you’re actually flying on the latest Harry Potter rideCredit: Shutterstock Orlando Theme park magic and sun-drenched days are guaranteed. Park ’n’ ride Thrill-seekers will forever flock to Florida for the world’s best theme parks, which keep getting bigger and better. At Universal Orlando Resort, you’ll feel like you’re actually flying on the latest Harry Potter ride, Hagrid’s Magical Creatures Motorbike Adventure. Day tickets cost from £100, but book online for the best deals (Universalorlando.com). Early next year, the world’s fastest and steepest hybrid (wood and steel) rollercoaster, Iron Dwazi, will open in Tampa Bay’s Busch Gardens. It will be the park’s 10th coaster, joining the likes of SheiKra, a 200ft, 90°-drop beast. Book online for the best day...
    MENLO PARK, Calif. (KGO) -- It's the cheapest, fastest COVID test on the market - based in the Bay Area.A quarter of all California's COVID tests are processed out of one small Menlo Park-based lab -- that's more than any other company across the state.RELATED: COVID testing company CEO warns of rapid test supply issues in coming monthsSummer Bio launched during the pandemic to make testing more accessible in schools and has since grown into the largest volume testing site in California. The company's mission is to drive down the cost of COVID testing."We wanted to build a testing structure that would allow everyone to get back to their normal lives," said the company's co-founder Dave Scheinman."We needed high quality, low cost testing with a fast turnaround time," Scheinman said.VIDEO: New California-made at-home COVID test on the wayEMBED More News Videos A new, less expensive, at-home COVID test is on the way. When the pandemic hit, diagnostic testing for COVID was limited, expensive, and plagued with slow turnaround times. Scheinman and his partner Sasha Seletsky made it their mission to...
    Joe Biden's argument that his multi-trillion dollar spending program will cost 'zero' is 'delusional,' some analysts warn, pointing out that everything has its price.  The president has repeatedly argued his multi-trillion social program - which increase funding for numerous fuderal programs involving education, healthcare and climate - will have no cost.  The cost of the Build Back Better bill, in terms of adding to the deficit, is zero because we're going to pay for it all. In addition to that, half of it is a tax cut. It's not spending money; it's a tax cut for working-class people,' Biden said Wednesday during a speech in Scranton. But some experts counter a price must be paid even if it's indirectly through a rise in goods and services instead of a hike in individual taxes.  'Everything gets paid for somehow. Of course if there's, if there's higher tax rates, somebody's going to pay for. So it's either going to be the companies are going to lower profits or they're gonna pass it on to consumers. That's called the market,' Joshua Sewell, a senior policy...
    It appears that some version of President Joe Biden's jobs-and-infrastructure plan is still alive and could very well be passed soon, despite the strenuous efforts of some of the shadier Democrats in Congress to kill it. The Washington Post reports that Biden is agreeing to scale back the bill from the original $3.5 trillion price tag to $1.9 trillion, largely to placate Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, two centrist holdouts who have been vocal about their belief that the original bill is simply too big. The Post describes Biden's new number as a possible "truce among Democrats' warring left-leaning and moderate factions." This language is misleading, however, for two major reasons. First, the vast majority of Democrats — 96%, to be exact, a group that encompasses both progressive and moderates— support passing Biden's original bill. The holdouts are just a handful of problem children, whose motivations are often more about ego and corruption than ideology. But just as importantly, such framing falsely implies that this is a clash between spendthrift progressives and the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- A new poll by Joint Venture Silicon Valley reveals that a majority of Bay Area residents to consider leaving the region in the next few years.1,600 registered voters were surveyed from five Bay Area counties. The polls finds that 56% of people surveyed are likely to leave.RELATED: More people leaving California than moving in: Is the California Dream dead?A higher percentage than previous polls show a number of factors contribute to the migration out of the Bay Area - high cost of living, homelessness, drought conditions, and wildfires.The new results compare to a previous survey taken before the pandemic showed that 46% of residents were ready to move out of the Bay Area.That is a 10% jump from poll by the Bay Area Council.RELATED: Bay Area exodus: Where is everyone going and why?During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, 60% of residents surveyed say their lives are "more stressful" and 66% are "worried about the future."The general cost of living and high housing costs allude to the top two reasons Bay Area residents are likely to leave.
    Millions of retirees will see a significant boost to their Social Security checks as the Biden administration gave its cost of living adjustment (COLA) the most significant boost in nearly 40 years.  Social Security checks will raise 5.9%, about $92 for the average retired worker, in a shocking display of inflation. For the last 10 years, an inflation lull has led to checks that rise only 1.65% per year on average. The Social Security Administration has not raised benefits so drastically year-over-year since 1982.   A typical retired worker will now receive $1,657 a month starting next year while a typical couple's benefits will rise $157 to $2,753 per month. To account for the added cost to taxpayers, the Social Security tax will be applied to earnings up to $147,000 in 2022, up from $142,800 this year.  The COLA affects nearly 1 in 5 Americans, 70 million people in total, including Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees. About half of seniors live in a household where Social Security accounts for at least half of their income, and one-fourth say they rely on...
    Russia was not invited to attend a 30-country virtual meeting to discuss ransomware on Wednesday, according to a senior Biden administration official. The country hosts many of the hacker syndicates believed to be behind an epidemic of global attacks that cost $400 million in payments last year but will not be part of a White House-led effort to find new strategies to counter the threat. 'We are having active discussions with the Russians, but in this particular forum they were not invited to participate,' said a senior administration official.  Also absent from the list of participants was the world's second biggest economy, China, which was accused of hacking Microsoft servers earlier this year.  Nations were meeting to discuss ransomware attacks, which use a type of malware that criminals use to encrypt files on a victim's computer network before demanding a ransom to restore the data. President Biden's White House is hosting a virtual ransomware summit on Wednesday but Vladimir Putin's Russia was not invited to take part. U.S. officials say Russia hosts many of the cybercriminal gangs responsible for an...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. How much does it cost to give birth in Maryland? It depends on which hospital you choose. In 2019, the Maryland Department of Health reported 209,836 live births. And, according to the Maryland Health Care Commission’s Wear The Cost campaign, if the mother had private insurance and underwent a cesarean section, she could expect the procedure to cost an average of $14,695 and, at its highest, $23,608. Vaginal births that year had an average medical bill of $13,458, but could reach up to $18,414. Those are huge financial discrepancies. But the Maryland Health Care Commission said common procedures like c-sections and vaginal births are “shoppable,” allowing expectant families to compare prices before selecting a hospital. The commission has updated its Wear the Cost campaign data to provide financial transparency for cost of childbirth and 11 other common medical procedures, including hysterectomies, knee replacements and tonsillectomies. The lowest cost for a tonsillectomy at seven hospitals surveyed was $2,864. But the same...
    On Thursday’s broadcast of the Fox Business Network’s “Kudlow,” Sen. Bill Hagerty (R-TN) argued that whatever the final dollar amount of the budget reconciliation bill is, the bill is “broadening social programs to an extent that they’ll never be cut back” and will “be denominated in the tens of trillions of dollars by the time this is moved through the system.” Hagerty said, [relevant remarks begin around 1:20] “[W]hether the number is five trillion, three trillion, or two trillion that they come up with, that’s only the beginning of this. Because what they’re talking about doing is broadening social programs to an extent that they’ll never be cut back. This is going to burden our children and our grandchildren. It’s going to be inherently more inflationary. And this is something that’s going to be denominated in the tens of trillions of dollars by the time this is moved through the system.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
    (CNN)Half a billion dollars of aircraft that flew for about a year. A huge $85 million hotel that never opened, and sits in disrepair. Camouflage uniforms for the Afghan army whose fancy pattern would cost an extra $28 million. A healthcare facility listed as located in the Mediterranean Sea. These are part of a catalog of "waste, fraud and abuse" complaints made against the United States' reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan -- an effort totaling $145 billion over 20 years -- made by the United States' own inspector general into the war. But the in-depth audits detailing these findings have, for the most part, been taken offline at the request of the State Department, citing security concerns. The total cost of the war, according to the Pentagon, was $825 billion, a low-end estimate: even President Joe Biden has cited an estimate that put the amount at over double that -- more than $2 trillion, a figure that factors in long-term costs such as veterans' care. The interest on the debt runs into hundreds of billions already. The $145 billion reconstruction effort...
    With all of the conversations about public safety in Minneapolis, one incredibly important thing seems to be flying under the radar: The ballooning cost of policing threatens the city’s entire budget. The mayor unveiled his proposed 2022 budget in August and it includes an unprecedented amount of financial risk related to police lawsuits. I hope that voters will see through the influx of misleading political mailers and fear-mongering online ads trying to obscure the truth: Minneapolis taxpayers are paying more and more for policing and getting less and less in return. There is an urgent need to invest in a more fiscally responsible and resilient system of safety, something that I and other City Council members have fought to do for years to do despite aggressive opposition from the mayor, the Police Federation and their allies. When I took office in 2014, the Minneapolis Police Department budget was $145.6 million to cover 850 sworn personnel. In 2021, the MPD budget is $181.9 million to cover an authorized police force of 770 officers. Despite a $36 million annual increase, 22% higher...
    Biden cancels trip to focus on infrastructure bill, Britney Spears conservatorship: 5 Things podcast Rikers Island conditions so bad that DA says not to ask for bail in nonviolent cases The music of the Mountain Goats lives on stage. Fronted by John Darnielle, the North Carolina-based indie rockers have played more than 1,000 concerts over their multi-decade career. Live shows are "among the oldest things humans do," notes the 54-year-old singer. "To gather is a communal, spiritual, and arguably religious experience." © Provided by Entertainment Weekly Illustration by Álvaro Bernis for EW For bands residing in the middle to outer tiers of fame, touring has another component that is just as vital as the communal, spiritual, and religious — it is also an economic essential. So when COVID-19 vaccines started rolling out earlier this year, accompanied by reschedulings of delayed concerts and announcements of new tours, many were relieved. Superstars such as Drake and Taylor Swift can survive a delayed show or 200, but most artists — and the crews working for them — depend on concerts as...
    AN INTERIOR design expert has revealed how one greedy builder tried to charge her thousands for the installation of wooden panelling in her home. Liz, who uploads cleaning and home interior videos to TikTok, explained that she tried to hire a builder to create a grey accent wall in her stylish dining room. 3Liz revealed that a contractor tried to overcharge herCredit: TikTok/@lizluxehome 3She and her husband did the job themselves, and it only cost $500Credit: TikTok/@lizluxehome She was left shocked when she was quoted $4.5k (£3.3k) for the work, so decided to take on the job herself with help from her husband. "When the contractor quotes you $4.5k... you do it yourself for $500 (£365)," she wrote in a video she uploaded online. In the clip, you can see a before and after of the job they completed, with the walls in her dining room having been completely transformed. FABULOUS BINGO: GET A £5 FREE BONUS WITH NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED Liz revealed that it took her and her husband three days to finish it all. While what they achieved...
    Candace Ayers, 66, died from COVID-19 at HSHS St Johns Hospital in Springfield, Illinois despite being fully vaccinated The family of a fully vaccinated Illinois woman who died from COVID-19 has blamed the millions of unvaccinated Americans for her death. Candance Ayers, 66, of Springfield, was vaccinated with the Moderna shot in March along with her husband Terry before being infected with the virus. She died six months later, on September 3 at HSHS St. John’s Hospital. Her family published an obituary which stated: 'She was preceded in death by more than 4,531,799 others infected with Covid-19. 'She was vaccinated but was infected by others who chose not to be. The cost was her life.'  Her son Marc believes that his mother contracted the virus in July after she and his father went to visit a friend, whose husband died of COVID-19, in Mississippi, where the vaccination rate is only 42%, according to the state's health website.  Ayers's son Marc (above) was among family members who blamed the unvaccinated in his mother's obituary 'This all could have been...
    In this article RY4C-IE EZJ-GB IAG-GB LHA-DE WIZZ-GB Ryanair and EasyJet airplanes.Horacio Villalobos | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesLONDON — European low-cost airlines have clear advantages over larger flag carriers in a post-pandemic world, analysts have told CNBC, despite the massive support packages deployed from governments around the world. It's been a bruising time for airlines as the coronavirus pandemic brought travel to a halt. But now, low-cost carriers seem to be showing signs of recovery compared with national carriers, which can often be subsidized or given preferential treatment. "You are seeing legacy carriers unable to move so quickly compared with the lost-cost carriers out of the pandemic," Paul Charles, chief executive officer of the luxury travel consultancy firm The PC Agency, told CNBC's "Squawk Box Europe" Monday. The International Air Transport Association said earlier this month that both international and domestic flights surged in July compared to June, but demand was still "far below pre-pandemic levels." In Europe alone, passenger traffic was still down 56.5% from July 2019. However, easyJet, a British low-cost carrier, said it expects...
    Potentially preventable COVID-19 hospitalizations have cost the U.S. billions of dollars, a new analysis finds. The Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) looked at hospitalization costs for unvaccinated people across the country since June 2021. Researchers estimate that 287,000 hospitalizations have occurred over the past three months, including 187,000 in August alone. Each one of these hospitalizations costs an average of $20,000, meaning that there was $5.7 billion in preventable health care spending over the past three months.  Researchers from KFF also note that this is a conservative estimate, meaning the true costs could be even higher. A KFF analysis finds that more than $5.7 billion was spent by Americans on preventable Covid hospitalizations from June to August 2021 Researchers estimate that 287,000 hospitalizations have occurred over the past three months, mostly unvaccinated adults. Pictured: Staff members help a newly arriving 81-year-old COVID-19 patient get settled into the ICU ward at Roseland Community Hospital in Chicago, December 2020 Every single adult in the U.S. has been eligible for the Covid vaccine since about May with every state fully opening its rollout...
    We begin today’s roundup with Dan Morain, former editorial page editor of the Sacramento Bee, and his piece on today’s recall attempt in California: Republican fantasies of evicting Gavin Newsom from the California governor’s office are about to be dashed. Despite some recent polls indicating potential trouble for Newsom, actual turnout in early voting — as well as patterns in candidate fundraising — suggest that he is all but certain to survive the Republican-backed recall effort. [...] This should prompt soul-searching among California’s Republicans, whose failure would make their nemesis almost untouchable in his 2022 reelection campaign, and would have needlessly tarnished some of their own most promising leaders for naught. It’s no surprise that Republicans are already crying fraud. After all, their new rule is if a Democrat may win, it must be fraud. From Damon Linker at The Week: In what must be the least surprising (but nonetheless demoralizing) story of the week, The New York Times reports that Republicans in California have begun to make accusations of voter fraud ahead of Tuesday's gubernatorial recall election. The story is unsurprising because all...
    A tourist boat passes cowboy statues along Oklahoma City's Bricktown Canal. Western heritage is a big draw in Oklahoma's capital.Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau Ready to head out on vacation after the long pandemic-era drought — but not looking to go broke in the process? Online airport parking platform ParkSleepFly has ranked the most — and least — affordable choices out of 51 U.S. destinations for vacationers, weighing six metrics ranging from the average price of a beer to the typical cost of a night's accommodations. The capital of Oklahoma, the aptly named Oklahoma City, came it at No. 1, ParkSleepFly found, with a score of 8.58 out of a possible 10. Thanks to great deals like beers for as little as $3, $11.50 restaurant meals and $106 for a hotel room, "Oklahoma City tourists could extend their vacations almost three times longer than if visiting New York for exactly the same price," said ParkSleepFly CEO Martin Jones. "Despite not being the top of most people's bucket lists, Oklahoma City is a great place to visit," Jones added, noting...
    President Joe Biden on Thursday slammed the 80 million Americans who have yet to get a COVD vaccine shot, asking them 'what more is there to wait for.'   'This is not about freedom or personal choice. It's about protecting yourself and those around you, the people you work with, the people you care about, the people you love. My job as president is to protect all Americans,' he said in remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House. 'We've been patient but our patience is wearing thin. And your refusal has cost all of us. So please do the right thing,' he said.  He charged the unvaccinated with 'overcrowding our hospitals and overrunning emergency rooms intensive care units, leaving no room for someone with a heart attack or pancreatic cancer.' The president decried the 'pandemic politics' that he said was behind those who had not yet gotten a shot in the arm, calling out public officials who were 'actively working to undermine the fight against COVID-19.' 'These pandemic politics, as I refer to, are making people sick, causing unvaccinated...
    Secretary of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra speaks to the press after taking a tour of a vaccination site at Community of Hope, a community heath center, on May 5, 2021 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer | Getty Images Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra on Thursday unveiled the Biden administration's road map to lowering the cost of prescription drugs in the U.S. The plan, summarized in a 29-page document, supports legislation that allows the U.S. government to negotiate lower prices on the costliest drugs each year and pass those savings on to private insurers. Current rules prohibit the HHS from negotiating drug prices on behalf of Medicare — the federal government's health insurance plan for the elderly. It would reduce regulatory barriers to getting a new drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration and incentivize drugmakers to develop medications that are already on the U.S. market, ensuring competition and forcing other companies to lower prices, according to the administration.CNBC Health & Science Read CNBC's latest global coverage of the Covid pandemic: WHO says wealthy nations are prolonging...
    Along those lines, Lore claims that the current system of capitalism has "significant flaws," many of them due to "the land ownership model that America was built on." "While the current economic system is a growth engine, it has led to increasing inequality," the project's website explains. Instead, it touts a new economic vision called "equitism" as a way to build "inclusive growth." "If you went into the desert where the land was worth nothing, or very little, and you created a foundation that owned the land, and people moved there and tax dollars built infrastructure and we built one of the greatest cities in the world, the foundation could be worth a trillion dollars," Lore told Bloomberg. "And if the foundation's mission was to take the appreciation of the land and give it back to the citizens in the form of medicine, education, affordable housing, social services: Wow, that's it!" he added. Bloomberg reported that the initial phase of the project would be built to accommodate 50,000 residents across roughly 1,500 acres by 2030 at a cost of...
    by Montse Reyes This story was originally published at Prism. Michigan’s largest insurance companies have announced they will stop free treatments for patients diagnosed with COVID-19 starting Sept. 30, joining other states across the country who have sunsetted their fee waiver programs. Vaccines and booster shots will remain free. The announcement comes as more vaccines have been made available, but also as the state sees a new surge in COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations. As of Aug. 25, the state announced a total of 933,394 cases and 20,123 deaths due to COVID-19. More than 4,300 new cases were confirmed on Monday, Aug. 23 and Tuesday, Aug. 24, and hospitalizations have increased by 231% since July 1. Dr. Victoria Dooley, a family medicine physician in Novi, Michigan, anticipates this move will have a tremendous impact on residents across the state. “Fear of medical costs is the number one obstacle to medical care,” Dooley said, noting that this will impact vaccinated people as well, since breakthrough cases persist—even those requiring hospitalization. “The one small consolation, debt-free medical care, is being taken away from everyone,...
    (CNN)Supreme Court justices tout judicial integrity and the importance of public confidence in their decisions, but the court's midnight silence Tuesday while letting a Texas law that curtails abortion rights take effect -- followed by a midnight order Wednesday -- offers the latest and most compelling example of its lack of transparency and the cost.The justices' secretive patterns have gained new attention as confidence in all government institutions has waned. Witnesses before a bipartisan commission set up by President Joe Biden to consider court revisions -- most visibly, the options of term limits and the addition of more seats -- have targeted the justices' secrecy and how it contributes to public distrust of the high court, along with the lopsided advantage the court gives to some litigants.READ: Supreme Court order and dissents in challenge to Texas abortion lawSuch lack of transparency is only part of the context behind the Supreme Court's silence in the closely watched Texas case. The emboldened conservative majority already is poised to reverse or at least undercut Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark ruling that declared...
    Reginald Mathalone/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.A new law that bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy—and allows any private citizen to sue both abortion providers and individuals who “aid and abet” individuals trying to obtain an abortion—has officially gone into effect in Texas after the US Supreme Court failed to take action in an emergency appeal from abortion providers. The near-total ban, as most people don’t realize they may be pregnant before six weeks, makes no exception for cases of rape or incest. As my colleague Becca Andrews wrote in May when Gov. Greg Abbott signed the bill into law: [Texas’s law] is another so-called “heartbeat” bill, which is a misnomer. At around six weeks gestation, a flickering of electricity appears within a portion of tissue that will become a heart should the embryo continue to develop. It is, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, definitively not a heartbeat. And there are other issues with these bills, which have also passed in Idaho, South Carolina,...
    An Afghan mother sits with her children on the tarmac at Hamid Karzai airport. The oldest of the U.S. service members to lose their lives to an ISIS-K bomb at the Kabul airport was ten years old when the United States occupied Afghanistan. For most of them “we have always been at war in Afghanistan” wasn’t some pun on the doublespeak of 1984, it was simply the world as they knew it.  They missed seeing the end of that war by less than two weeks, and the rawness of that tragedy is just a shadow of the real cost—emotional, physical, mental, fiscal, diplomatic, environmental, cultural—of America’s twenty year dalliance in a nation we refused to understand. Now it’s over. Or, as over as wars ever get. The cost will linger, of course. It will linger in the resentment and loss of thousands of families in America, hundreds of families in allied nations, and hundreds of thousands of families in the region for whom that cost is endless. It’s existence will still be written in the flesh of more than 20,000 veterans. It will have...
    Dear MarketWatch, I am 66, single, and hoping to retire soon. I currently live in Connecticut, where taxes are quite high, and am looking for a less expensive place that is also warmer. I have cash assets of about $900,000 and another maybe $200,000 in equity in my house (but I might want to keep the house for rental income). I’d like my main source of retirement income to be my Social Security of about $26,300 a year. I want to travel, so I don’t want to spend a lot on housing, and I would like a small city, no more than 30 minutes from the Atlantic Ocean. I’d also like a city that’s two hours or less by car from an international airport. It would be great if the city has a college or university and/or a mixed population including retirees. Any great ideas? Thank you,MAM—————————————————————————————————————————Dear MAM, You’re part of a big trend: People getting the heck out of the Northeast for cheaper living and warmer weather — many of them to the South. And while...
    The financial cost of remaining unvaccinated ⁠against COVID-19 is rising. Health insurance providers are now asking people who contract the disease to share the cost of treatment, which can get expensive if that requires a lengthy hospital stay. Early in the pandemic, most private insurers waived cost-sharing for patients under their plans or even covered the full cost of treatment. In November 2020, nearly 90% of insured individuals would have had their out-of-pocket costs — including copays, coinsurance or payments toward a deductible — waived if they had been hospitalized for COVID-19, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF).   But with effective coronavirus vaccines widely available, most insurers are no longer waiving those costs, according to KFF. The change reflects a broader push by U.S. companies to nudge workers into getting inoculated in hopes of holding down medical expenses. To that end, Delta Air Lines this week said that it would charge unvaccinated employees an extra $200 a month for health coverage. Delta Air Lines to charge unvaccinated staff 00:37 Insurer profits soared during the...
    IF we had to describe our dream home, it would be a stunning newly-renovated property with lots of open-plan rooms. But most importantly, it'd have a walk-in wardrobe that'd make Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw envious. 5Megan used Ikea's Pax wardrobes - which cost £40Credit: megsathome/Instagram 5They changed the handles to give it a more luxe lookCredit: megsathome/Instagram That said, we always imagined that the closet of our dreams could easily set us back thousands - which is why it's remained something of a pipedream. But now savvy DIY fan Megan Righelato - who runs the Instagram account @megsathome - has revealed how she made her stunning walk-in wardrobe on a budget with some purse-friendly Ikea bargains. Speaking to MattressNextDay about her bedroom transformation, Megan said: "We are having to budget as we're renovating the whole house, and adding an extension downstairs next year."  After doing some online research, the social media star worked out that it would cost £1,200 to have a walk-in wardrobe professionally fitted - as labour costs can be up to £200 a day. Determined to...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A recent study from Zumper looked into the median cost for rental properties in the United States, and they found that Pittsburgh ranks 50th in the country. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Police Comfort Dog Zane Passes Good Citizen Test According to the study, the average cost for a one-bedroom rental in Pittsburgh is $1,130 per month while a two-bedroom costs $1,360. The study also found that rent growth throughout the country has continued to accelerate, finding that median one-bedroom cost is up 9.2% and two-bedrooms increasing 11%, all since the second quarter of 2020. READ MORE: Law Named For Penn State Student Who Died In Hazing Incident Will Impose Stricter Penalties As of August 2021, New York City surpassed San Francisco as the most expensive market, with a median cost of $2,810, compared to $2,800 for San Francisco. Rounding out the top five most-expensive markets, Boston was third at $2,300, San Jose in fourth at $2,200, and Washington D.C. in fifth with $2,160. The cheapest median cost for a...