Monday, Dec 06, 2021 - 05:53:57
78 results - (0.001 seconds)

residents had:

latest news at page 1:
12
    RESIDENTS living at an estate plagued by rats and flies thought that someone had DIED because of the horrendous stench. Locals living in Altrincham, Greater Manchester, have been driven so mad by the waste and rodents that they are desperately trying to move out. 5Residents have complained about excessive dust and rodentsCredit: MEN Media 5Flies are also alleged to be part of the issue that residents are battling withCredit: MEN Media People living on Great Oak Drive are now blaming a nearby waste disposal unit for the problems that they are facing. But Allen’s Waste Disposal Limited, which has been in business since the 1950s, claim that they are being “victimised” and were working in the area before the estate was built. The Environment Agency is carrying out an investigation following complaints of rats and fly infestations. Residents are also claiming the dust from the site make it difficult for them to even open their windows in the summer. They have raised concerned about the long term risk of health problems linked to air quality. But the Environment Agency has...
    A geneticist has revealed how he and other students were 'terrorised' by an 'evil spirit' in the same university room in a chilling new podcast series that claims to be 'the biggest ever investigation into the paranormal'.  Ken, now in his 60s, recalled a malicious force that haunted his bedroom at Queen's University Belfast in the 1980s, sending cutlery flying, stalking empty corridors and trying to 'bang down the door'. Over three years, three groups of students staying in room 611 in Alanbrooke Hall reported supernatural happenings, including friends who believed their dreams had been hijacked by the force.   Speaking to presenter Danny Robins on BBC Radio 4 podcast Uncanny, Ken explained he later learned at least three former residents of the room had died, including one who was rumoured to have been pushed out of the window. Ken recalled a malicious force that haunted his bedroom at Queen's University Belfast in the 1980s, stalking empty corridors and trying to 'bang down the door'. Stock image Ken, who grew up in rural Northern Ireland, said he doesn't believe in ghosts, but has...
    RESIDENTS of the apartment building where a maintenance man broke into Miya Marcano's apartment shortly before she went missing slammed the building's owners for the "disgusting" security breach. "Us not knowing who is entering our apartment or who has access to our apartment at any given time, we have to keep our guard up 24/7 and that's not okay," resident and University of Central Florida student Eryn Rutherford told WESH2. 5Residents said the lack of security at the apartment complex is 'disgusting'Credit: Youtube/WESH2 5Miya went missing on September 24 Fellow student Julia Veiga also told the outlet: "It's disgusting that we have had to take it into our own hands!" Miya, 19, vanished from the Arden Villas apartments in Orange County, Florida on September 24 shortly after Armando Caballero, a maintenance man at the building, used a master key fob to enter her room. Her remains were found on October 2 in a wooded area near the Tymber Skan apartments, where Caballero also worked. Caballero, 27, was found dead of a suspected suicide on September 27. 'HARD TO BELIEVE' It...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — With the FDA having granted emergency use authorization for a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot for some Americans, health officials on Tuesday say that already 54,209 Minnesotans have had a third COVID vaccine shot. According to the Minnesota Department of Health’s daily update, there are an additional 6,203 virus cases and 11 more deaths since Monday’s update. The state’s total positive cases have risen to 706,158 since the pandemic began, with 8,109 deaths attributed to the virus. READ MORE: Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Alleging Minn. DOC Failed To Properly Prioritize Inmates For COVID VaccinesMeanwhile, the latest rolling seven-day average positivity rate has notched down to 6.6%, as reported Tuesday. The positivity rate, which went as far down as 1.1% in the middle of summer, remains in the “caution” status; the line for high risk is drawn at 10%. Total ICU bed usage among COVID-19 patients is also starting to show signs of scaling back, with 196 listed in that category Tuesday. (The peak number of recorded ICU patients with COVID-19 was at the beginning of Dec. 2020, at nearly...
    A nursing home where almost every resident was fully vaccinated suffered a COVID-19 outbreak, though damage from the virus was limited due to the shots, a new study finds. A French research team, led by scientists from Hôpital Charles Foix in Ivry-sur-Seine, investigated a 17-case outbreak at a nursing home in Biscarrosse, France - 167 miles west of Toulouse -  from January and February 2021. The facility houses 74 seniors, of which 70 were fully vaccinated - or 95 percent of residents - and two were at least partially vaccinated. Only two of those living at the nursing home were unvaccinated, and one of them was the only person to die from the virus.  There were also only two hospitalizations out of all who contracted COVID-19. The researchers believe their investigation shows that fully vaccinated people can contract Covid, but even the elderly - who are among the most vulnerable to the virus - can recover with little complications if they are vaccinated. Seventeen cases of COVID-19 were tied to an outbreak at a nursing home in France that had fully...
    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday that 364,842,701 doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in the U.S., with 202,500,853 people having received at least one dose and 171,773,370 people now fully vaccinated. The data show 61% of the population has received at least one dose of vaccine, with 51.7% completely vaccinated; 71.3% of U.S. residents 12 and older have received at least one shot, while 60.5% are fully vaccinated. Among adults 18 and older, 73.4% have received one shot, while 62.7% are fully vaccinated. U.S. residents over 65 represent the largest vaccinated demographic, with 91.6% having had one shot, while 81.3% are fully vaccinated. The CDC says that, in total, 430,118,615 doses of COVID vaccines have been distributed throughout the country. Some information for this report came from Reuters.  
    COVID-19 may have infected more Americans in 2020 than previously believed, a new study finds. Researchers from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health simulated transmission of the virus across the country, and found that 31 percent of the country's population had contracted the virus at some point last year. This means that there could have been around 100 million cases in the U.S. last year compared to the official count of 34.4 million - an undercount of nearly 66 percent. In some areas, more than 60 percent of the population was infected.  The team says its simulation also found that nearly 80 percent of cases may have gone undetected.  A study finds that U.S. COVID-19 cases may he been undercounted by 66 million last year, and that nearly a third of residents were infected last year. Cases were significantly undercounted early last year. The blue bars on the chart represent the estimated 'real' case count throughout 2020, with numbers on the x-axis corresponding to the month of the year the data is gathered from ('3' represents March). The...
    (CNN)Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Monday announced "very startling numbers," including the state's largest single-day increase in hospitalizations, eclipsing its previous high of Covid-19 admissions.In a tweet, Hutchinson said there were only eight available intensive care unit beds in the state. The Arkansas Department of Health is reporting 995 new Covid-19 cases Monday, and 21 new Covid-19 related deaths.There are 1,376 people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 in Arkansas, up by 103 from Sunday, according to the department. Of those, 286 cases are currently on ventilators, 25 more than the previous day, the department said.All the beds are taken up by Covid victims: Hospitals in the South are running out of space or staffAlmost 43% of Arkansas residents 12 years and older have been fully vaccinated, according to data from the state health department. Nationwide, 58.7% of residents 12 and older have been fully vaccinated, according to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Read More"Vaccinations reduce hospitalizations," Hutchinson said in his tweet.Arkansas is one of a growing number of states, including Missouri, Texas and Florida, that are seeing...
    MARKLEEVILLE, Alpine County (CBS SF) — As firefighters battled a wall of flames burning through miles of tinder-dry trees and brush in the Sierra near Lake Tahoe early Tuesday, local residents were questioning the initial U.S. Forest Service response to the blaze that began smoldering after a July Fourth weekend lightning strike. While residents took to social media to thank firefighters for their efforts, many were also wondering why it took so long to get enough resources in the area to halt the Tamarack Fire’s rapid growth. READ MORE: History Made In Texas As Jeff Bezos Blue Origin New Shepard Crew Takes Spaceflight The fire began as one of nearly two dozen small blazes ignited in the Sierra wilderness by lighting strikes. The fire roared to life on Friday, quickly growing from 500 acres to more than 39,000 acres by early Tuesday. At the time it exploded to life, there were 50 firefighters assigned to monitor the fire. They were quickly overwhelmed, but were able to successfully keep the flames from burning through the center of the evacuated community of...
    MARKLEEVILLE, Alpine County (CBS SF) — As firefighters battled a wall of flames burning through miles of tinder-dry trees and brush in the Sierra near Lake Tahoe early Tuesday, local residents were questioning the initial U.S. Forest Service response to the blaze that began smoldering after a July Fourth weekend lightning strike. While residents took to social media to thank firefighters for their efforts, many were also wondering why it took so long to get enough resources in the area to halt the Tamarack Fire’s rapid growth. READ MORE: Oakland As Future Hangs In The Balance; Crucial City Council Vote Tuesday The fire began as one of nearly two dozen small blazes ignited in the Sierra wilderness by lighting strikes. The fire roared to life on Friday, quickly growing from 500 acres to more than 39,000 acres by early Tuesday. At the time it exploded to life, there were 50 firefighters assigned to monitor the fire. They were quickly overwhelmed, but were able to successfully keep the flames from burning through the center of the evacuated community of Markleeville. By...
    More On: heat wave Devastating wildfires torch homes, force thousands to evacuate in Western US Extreme heat boils Canada’s waters and shellfish Western states facing more blistering heat, fire danger Oregon adopts most protective heat rules for workers in US PORTLAND, Ore. — Most people who perished in last month’s record-smashing heat wave in Oregon’s most populous county were white, male, older and socially isolated, according to a preliminary report released Tuesday in Portland. Initial tallies show that heat was likely the cause of death for 71 residents of Multnomah County, home to Oregon’s largest city. The heat has been officially confirmed as the cause of death in 54 of those people. Some residents’ bodies were not found for up to a week after the worst of the heat had passed, a fact that authorities said supports the role of social isolation in the deaths. The average age was 70. “Many of them were our elders, those who need our care the most and many were all alone,” County Chair Deborah Kafoury said. Three consecutive days of extraordinary temperatures...
    A mass labor shortage has left the privileged residents of the Hamptons fending for themselves.  The combination of soaring local rental prices, the ban on temporary work visas and the fact that many hospitality workers are not keen to rush back to their grueling, low paid jobs after generous Covid-19 boosted unemployment, has left many Hamptonites without paid help for the first time.  Some wealthy residents have even been forced to do the unthinkable; mow their own lawns or wash their own laundry. 'I had to buy a lawn mower and cut my own lawn. I wanted flowers planted behind the pool,' one resident posted on the neighborhood app Nextdoor. 'The landscaper didn't show up. I had to do it myself,'  The same person added that their brother had to teach them how to use 'the thing that trims the weeds.'   'Yesterday, I finally did that. I had to take my $800 sneakers off first, but it was actually satisfying,' the resident added. A mass labor shortage has left the wealthy and privileged residents of the Hamptons fending for themselves in...
    Unnerving footage from inside the Miami condo that collapsed shows the seconds before the 12-story building fell and reveals residents would have had no time to react.  The 13-second video posted on Twitter shows debris falling in one of the apartments before the footage shakes and the video shuts off.  Officially, one woman has been confirmed dead and 11 injured after the Champlain Towers South beachfront building collapsed at about 1:30am on Thursday in Miami's Surfside neighborhood.  But there are still 99 people missing, so the death total could certainly climb. Hundreds of rescue crews are searching through tons of rubble while desperate families wait for news of any survivors.  The Twitter user who posted the video - @_rosie santana - said in the tweet that she's a resident of one of the condos.  'This is a video from my camera footage inside from the start of the collapse until the lose (sic) of connection (I was away from the building today). Towards the end, you hear the structure failing,' she tweeted.  Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who represents Surfside, Florida,...
    GREAT NECK, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Some residents on Long Island who live near a gas main project say they have headaches during the day from a lack of sleep during the night. CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan has more on those sleepless in Great Neck. READ MORE: 73-Year-Old Long Island Man Determined To Keep Community Clean Spends Weekends Picking Up Trash Students and senior citizens say getting shut-eye has been tough. “In the morning it was very noisy,” one person said. “They work all night long until 6 in the morning,” another added. Condominium and home owners along Middle Neck Road took photos and videos of overnight National Grid construction, as workers replace a 1.3-mile long gas main using jackhammers and floodlights. “I have two little children, two little girls. We try and get them to sleep. They have floodlights coming in our windows. It’s an absolute disaster,” resident Joseph Allen said. READ MORE: Teen Gets Trapped In Bank Vault Turned Dressing Room At Long Island Clothing Store Allen and his family wonder why the work can’t be done during the day....
    Buoyed with optimism and a high vaccination rate, officials in Northern California’s most populous county phased out its last local COVID-19 health order Monday. “I feel very grateful today. And I feel very hopeful today,” said Dr. Sara Cody, the local health officer and public health director of Santa Clara County. The home of Silicon Valley was also the home to the first recorded COVID-19 death in the nation. “And that’s because in Santa Clara County, and in the Bay Area region, our communities took COVID very seriously,” Cody said. “We also have had amazing uptake of vaccination.” Cody said 80% of residents 12 and older in Santa Clara County have received at least one dose of vaccine. Among residents of all ages, more than 71% are at least partially vaccinated. That is a big change from where Santa Clara County was more than a year ago, when it was home to the first recorded COVID-19 death in the nation. At the time, Cody struggled to convince the region that it was time to end large sporting...
    Areas of New York City with greater white populations had more COVID-19 vaccination sites than those with higher black or Hispanic populations, a new study finds. Researchers from the New York University Grossman School of Medicine looked at different districts in the borough of Brooklyn, and analyzed vaccine access along with racial demographics of each.     Districts with little to no white people about four vaccine sites compared to six sites in majority Caucasian area - a 50 percent difference.  The teams sats the findings show that this left many minority communities ill equipped to deal with the pandemic and likely contributed to the current racial disparity in vaccine distribution in the city. The median amount of COVID-19 vaccine sites in Brooklyn districts with a white population of over 40% was 50% higher, a new study finds (file image) For the study, published in JAMA Network Open, the team gathered data on 18 community districts in Brooklyn. They used the 2014 and 2018 American Community Survey results to estimate the racial makeup of each, and the city's online vaccine locater to find...
    PEOPLE who have already had Covid are protected from another infection for at least ten months, a study has shown. The “really good news” means a previously infected person is very unlikely to suffer the disease twice in one year, researchers said. ???? Read our coronavirus live blogfor the latest updates Safe for hugs? People who have previously had Covid are unlikely to get it again in a year Given seven in ten people in England have antibodies, and the vaccination programme is speeding ahead, it gives hope Covid cases will remain low. The Vivaldi study led by University College London looked at more than 2,000 care home residents and staff across 100 care homes. They underwent antibody testing last summer to see who had previously had Covid in the first wave. Antibodies are proteins in the blood involved with fighting infection, therefore signal someone has already had Covid and should be protected to some extent in the future. Researchers then kept records of Covid test results between October and February among the 682 residents and 1,429 staff members.  Only...
    The vast majority (94 percent) of U.S. nursing homes faced COVID outbreaks between May 2020 and January 2021, according to a new study from the Government Accountability Office. The average nursing home faced three outbreaks during this period, and 85 percent had an outbreak lasting at least five weeks. Some nursing homes had outbreaks that lasted 20 weeks or more, likely heightened by poor access to testing and protective equipment. As nursing home residents were prioritized in the first round of vaccinations, this vulnerable population has seen far fewer outbreaks in spring 2021. A nursing home resident gets vaccinated for COVID.  Only 64 outbreaks out of over 13,000 surveyed did not face any COVID outbreaks Nursing homes were an early - and devastating - site of COVID outbreaks in the U.S. In February 2020, about 27 out of 108 residents and 25 out of 180 staff at a facility in Kirkland, Washington became infected with the coronavirus. This became the first nursing home outbreak out of many. These facilities have been particularly vulnerable to COVID because they bring...
    COVID-19 infection risks fall drastically in high-risk nursing homes once a majority of residents have been vaccinated - even for those who have not had the shots, new research shows. Unvaccinated nursing home residents had an infection rate of 4.3 percent when Brown University researchers first started tracking data on February 15.  As time went on, the infection rate began to plummet, cutting by about two-thirds every 14 days as more of their peers became vaccinated.  By late March, 82 percent of the residents had had at least a first vaccine dose, and about 59 percent had been fully vaccinated. The infection rate among unvaccinated residents fell all the way to 0.3 percent.  The combination of high vaccination rates, masking and social distancing 'is likely to afford protection for the small numbers of unvaccinated residents in congregate settings,' the researchers wrote in a statement about their findings.  Nursing home residents were among the first Americans to be vaccinated against COVID-19, and the impressive decline in resident infections suggests that as more people get vaccinated, those who can't get shots will...
    A $30,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of a possible arsonist who may have started the Palisades fire popped up on social media late Saturday, attracting interest from residents on Twitter and Facebook, some who set about directing as much attention as they could to the search. A photo of a man — shirtless with a beanie, with Southern California hills as a backdrop — started circulating, with tipsters saying this was the man police and sheriff’s deputies were looking for. The problem: Law enforcement officials do not consider the man in question to be a suspect in the possible arson. The man was detained briefly early Sunday, but was let go, said Los Angeles Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas in a briefing Monday on behalf of several fire, police and city departments. “We did detain one person,” Terrazas said. “The first person was not a suspect. The second person was arrested yesterday.” That second man was taken to a hospital with symptoms of smoke inhalation, Terrazas said. Still unclear, though, is how the photo of the first man...
    Michigan announced on Friday that 54 percent of adults in the state have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine. The figure, rolled out on the state’s COVID-19 dashboard, marks a roughly 2.5 percentage point jump after including people who got their shots outside the state or at federal facilities. The new tracker incorporates data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses data from out-of-state providers and federal sites. Nearly 4.4 million Michiganders ages 16 and up have gotten at least one shot. The new high-water mark puts the state in striking distance of the 55 percent threshold Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerMichigan Senate votes to exempt high school graduations from crowd restrictions White House to shift how it distributes unallocated vaccines to states For Michigan, Biden's first 100 days brought much-needed relief MORE (D) has said is needed to allow in-person services in all sectors. Sports stadiums, banquet halls, conference centers and funeral homes will be able to be 25 percent full once 60 percent of residents have at least one dose, and all...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed giving the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine to tourists visiting New York City even though less than half of residents have had a first COVID-19 shot. De Blasio proposed having the health department launch a program to create vaccination stations at popular tourist destinations like Times Square and Brooklyn Bridge Park, Gothamist reported. Data from the NYC Health Department shows that there have been 3,713,467 city residents who have received at least on dose of a vaccine, or about 45 percent of all residents. Only 2,779,992 residents, or about 33 percent, are considered fully vaccinated. Right now, non-residents who can prove they work or attend school in New York City can receive vaccines but the mayor said he wants 'to go the extra mile and make it easy for tourists.' 'If they're here - get vaccinated while you're here. It makes sense to put mobile vaccination sites where the tourists are,' de Blasio said at a press briefing Thursday. Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed giving the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine to tourists visiting New...
    Pendleton, Oregon (CNN)This mountainous frontier city on the Columbia River plateau romanticizes the pioneer personality of the Old West and celebrates its rugged past with one of the world's oldest rodeos. In rural Umatilla County, where Pendleton is located, locals take pride in the region's deep sense of freedom, toughness and self-reliance. Revelers gather for UK rave experiment without social distancingIt's not entirely surprising then that residents are avoiding vaccination sites in droves, even as Oregon leads the nation in the rate of Covid-19 cases over the last two weeks and this remote northeastern county ranks at the bottom in vaccines administered per capita."It is still the frontier out in these hinterlands and there's certainly a sense of individualism," said Tracy Bosen, the vaccinated owner of Pendleton House Historic Inn and a proponent of the shot. "As far as the political realm is concerned, Pendleton is known for being the wild, wild West. People don't like to be told what they have to do when we have our lives and our livelihoods and families to take care of."Read MoreStill, Umatilla...
    Some of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Miami are completely vaccinated against COVID-19 while poorer communities remain largely unprotected. In exclusive areas such as Fisher Island and Key Biscayne - where homes sell for more than $2 million - 100 percent of residents have received at least one dose, an analysis from the Miami Herald found. But in ZIP codes that include Flamingo, Opa-locka and Allapattah, fewer than one-third of people are at least partially immunized. These communities are largely made up of black and Hispanic residents, where as many of 40 percent live in poverty.   In wealthy Miami neighborhoods such as Fisher Island and Key Biscayne, 100% of residents have had at least one vaccine dose. Pictured: Pharmacy student Jason Rodriguez (right) administers a Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine to Nils Buecheler in Miami, April 15 Poorer neighborhoods with mostly black residents in North Miami such as Flamingo and Opa-locka, see fewer than one-third of people at least partially immunized. Pictured: A health care worker prepares to immunize JP Bejarano at the Miami Dade College North Campus in North Miami, Florida,...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Residents in East New York say there is so much garbage being dumped around city-owned lots, people can’t even walk on the sidewalks. Now neighbors are saying enough is enough. CBS2’s has more in a story only on 2. READ MORE: Mayor De Blasio Celebrates First Prayer Of Ramadan At Manhattan Mosque As the garbage piles up, so does Andre Donald’s anger. For the past year, he’s watched in horror as garbage has stacked on the sidewalks adjacent to the four empty lots next to his house in East New York. “It’s disgusting. It’s gross. It’s just not right. You’re not supposed to live like this,” Donald said. (credit: Kiran Dhillon/CBS2) The lots at the corner of Montauk and Glenmore Avenues are both privately and city owned. Donald says overgrown weeds in the lots have been a problem from years – but the trash on the sidewalks has escalated during the pandemic. His family has made more than a dozen complaints to 311, but to their dismay, the garbage has not been cleaned up. “I play...
    CHICAGO RIDGE, Ill. (CBS) — A dead-end block in southwest suburban Chicago Ridge has become a dumping ground – and neighbors are saying enough is enough. As CBS 2’s Meredith Barack reported, the mayor of Chicago Ridge said he has a plan to deal with it. READ MORE: Yates Device -- Developed By Local Doctors Company -- Employs Lights, Sirens, Cameras To Deter Carjackers Along Marshall Avenue in Chicago Ridge, there are signs that say, “No dumping,” with warrants that violators will be prosecuted and will face a minimum fine of $500. It is what multiple signs along Marshall Avenue in Chicago Ridge say, but people clearly aren’t abiding by them. “I’ve been here 17 years. At the property back here – it’s dumped on a weekly basis,” Said Sal Zermeno. “Once a week, maybe twice.” Zermeno said junk that people don’t want anymore seems to end up on the property right down the street from his house. Earlier this week, mattresses were piled into a pyramid. The village did come pick them up, but neighbors said the forsaken furniture...
    ST Vincent residents who have not had their Covid jabs are banned from being evacuated onto cruise ships after two volcanic eruptions on the island.  A second explosion of the La Soufriere volcano was observed on Friday, six hours after it erupted for the first time in more than 40 years. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 5Scientists warn that the explosions could continue for days or even weeks, and that the worst could be yet to come.Credit: AP 5Ashfall has been recorded as far from the volcano as Argyle International Airport some 12.4 miles awayCredit: Reuters 5Islanders are fleeing for their lives following two huge explosionsCredit: Reuters Earlier today, the island's emergency management organisation Nemo tweeted to confirm the majority of the country was experiencing power cuts as a result of another explosion ripped through the island.   Their tweet read: ''Massive power outage following another explosive event at La Soufriere Volcano. "Lightning, thunder and rumblings. Majority of the country out of power and covered in ash." As the crisis unfolded, cruise ship capains had...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — More than 20 people were injured and hundreds are displaced after a fire ripped through an apartment building Tuesday in Jackson Heights, Queens. The FDNY says the blaze is finally under control. Now, the investigation can begin. READ MORE: NYPD: 1 Suspect In Custody After Police-Involved Shooting In Brooklyn The fire broke out around 1 p.m. Tuesday on the sixth floor of a 133-unit building at 89th Street and 34th Avenue. Flames could be seen shooting out of apartment windows, as smoke poured into the streets. “It was a ton of smoke. I saw it from my window a block away,” said neighbor Marta Schlitzer. (CBS2) The fire commissioner said preliminary reports show the bruising battle for firefighters could have been avoided. “The occupant fled but left the door open. We’ve stressed over the years the seriousness of that. If you do unfortunately have a fire in your home or apartment, how important it is to close that door, because the fire spread out into the hallway,” said Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro. The flames then traveled north....
    (CNN)Counties in the United States with large Black, Asian and Hispanic populations were hit harder by Covid-19 in the early months of the pandemic, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a new study published Wednesday, CDC researchers said more than a quarter of counties with large Asian or Black populations reported a high Covid-19 incidence rate in the first two weeks of April last year. The CDC defines high incidence as more than 100 new Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in the total population.We are trying to live. Vaccine hesitancy is decreasing as call for equitable access intensifies At the time, about 11.4% of all counties had a high Covid-19 incidence rate, compared with nearly 29% of counties with an above-average share of Asian residents and nearly 28% of counties with an above-average share of Black residents, the study indicates."Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have placed many racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk for Covid-19," researchers wrote. "CDC continues to work with local and state health departments to improve reporting of race...
    MIAMI BEACH (CBSMiami) – Everyone who lives or works in Miami Beach is hoping for a much calmer week and weekend ahead. Still, the tumultuous couple of days of spring break trouble has been more than enough for some people. Faced with a pandemic and unruly crowds packing Miami Beach’s entertainment district, the city’s mayor said extended curfews and causeway closures are needed to keep the peace and people safe. READ MORE: Rep. Ted Deutch Renews Call For Gun Reform Following Boulder Shooting That ‘Hits Really Hard’ “Well, it feels in some ways like our city is a tinder right now. It’s not just about not wearing masks and physical distancing, it’s also some of the folks that are coming are coming with bad intention, so there’s been brawls and even gunplay. And when you have these levels of crowds, you can’t really manage, unless you have enormous policing and all that mixed creates a lot of peril and a lot of concern, and I do worry,” said Mayor Dan Gelber. Some people who live on Miami Beach said they’ve...
    Dr. Scott Gottlieb has warned that the New York variant of COVID-19 could reinfect survivors of the virus and people who have been vaccinated. The former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner spoke to CBS' Margaret Brennan on 'Face the Nation' about the variant known as B.1.526 and said it is not yet known where it is causing an increase in cases in parts of New York City. He warned: 'What we don’t understand with 1.526 is whether or not people are being re-infected with it and whether or not people who might have been vaccinated are now getting infected with it.   'One of the concerns about this particular variant is that it has that mutation that's also in the South African variant, in the B.1.351 variant, that we know in certain cases is causing people who have already had coronavirus to get reinfected with it.' He added: 'The question is whether 1.526 is responsible for some of the increases that we’re seeing in New York right now and whether this is the beginning of a new outbreak inside the city.'   NEW YORK...
    I’ve grown accustomed to conflicting views when it comes to the pandemic. We can gather in the library, but our kids can’t go to school. I can finally get my hair done, but a facial is not allowed. You shouldn’t wear a mask, you have to wear a mask, you really should be wearing two masks. I understand the inconsistency. This virus is so new that all of us — from CDC scientists to supermarket cashiers — are still trying to navigate a steep learning curve. And I like to think that nothing surprises me anymore. But then something comes along that shocks me all over again. Last week, it was the news about how many people locally already carry antibodies to the virus. According to some estimates, as reported in The Times and elsewhere, as many as half of Los Angeles County’s 10 million people have already been infected. And that’s even though tests for COVID-19 have confirmed fewer than 1.2 million local infections. The prospect of that many millions of uncounted infections seemed mind-boggling to me. How could...
    To fully understand this story, let’s go back two years. At that time Roland, an 88-year-old Toulouse resident, decided to leave his house in order to be closer to his wife, placed in nursing home. Even if he goes there regularly to maintain it, his “abandoned” house ends up attracting a group of squatters who take possession of the place. We are in September 2020. The neighborhood, who quickly realizes that something is wrong, warns Roland. Too late. According to French law, it is no longer possible to evict squatters who have been living for more than 48 hours in accommodation. The case then goes to court. A month later, the decision fell: the squatters could not be dislodged before the winter break in June. Roland, who wanted to sell his house in order to get closer to his wife, finds himself blocked, prevented from entering his own home, which he is forced to observe from the outside. “The judge, he agreed with them! That’s what I do not understand!”, explains Roland, “I am angry, I am 88 years...
    Derede McAlpin holds a photo of her mother, 92-year-old Sara McAlpin, who was diagnosed with Covid-19 in Rockville, MD.Katherine Frey | The Washington Post | Getty Images Nursing homes with more minority residents reported more than three times as many Covid deaths as those that had more White residents, a large study published Wednesday found. The University of Chicago researchers looked at 13,312 U.S. nursing homes and analyzed Covid data reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from May to December. They found that nursing homes where more than 40% of their residents were Black or Hispanic reported 3.3 times as many Covid deaths and cases as nursing homes that had more White residents. Nursing homes and other long-term care facilities have been hit hardest by the pandemic. Fewer than 1% of Americans live in such facilities, the CDC says, but they have accounted for almost 40% of all U.S. Covid deaths, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project. It's well documented that the pandemic has taken a disproportionate toll on ethnic and racial minorities in the...
    THE WORLD'S second-oldest person, a 116- year-old-nun, has beaten coronavirus. Sister Andre told local media she "didn't even realise she had it" and that she "wasn't scared". 4Sister Andre tested positive for Covid-19 in January but didn't display any symptomsCredit: AFP - Getty 4Sister Andre is thought to be the world's second-oldest personCredit: AFP - Getty Sister Andre, born Lucile Randon, tested positive for Covid-19 in January, after an outbreak at her retirement home in Toulon, France. The nun who is a wheelchair user was isolated from the other residents but didn't develop any symptoms. Sister Andre has now made a full recovery and is expecting to celebrate her 117th birthday tomorrow. David Tavella, spokesman for the Sainte Catherine Labouré retirement home, told Var-Matin newspaper: "She has been very lucky. "She didn't ask me about her health, but about her habits. For example, she wanted to know if meal or bedtime schedules would change. "She showed no fear of the disease. On the other hand, she was very concerned about the other residents." Sister Andre, originally from...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — In the middle of winter, senior residents in a NYCHA apartment building in the Bronx demand the most basic necessity — heat. Tenants gathered in the lobby of their building on Clinton Avenue in the Tremont section Wednesday. They say they have had little to no heat for months and had to live in the cold during one of the worst snow storms in years. “We are freezing to death. We have to walk around, sleep with our coats and our socks and run heaters,” said Tenants Association President Queen McFarland. “It is not fair. It is not right. It is not just, and NYCHA needs to step up and it needs to step up right now,” New York City Councilmember Fernando Cabrera said. NYCHA says the building has had six heating outages this season due to pipe leaks. The agency has a team on site to monitor service for residents. MORE FROM CBS NEW YORK Man Who Made Big Bucks Off GameStop Stock Sends Nintendo Switches To Children’s Hospital New Pre-Print Study Suggests COVID...
    The rate of coronavirus vaccinations is high among nursing home residents in the U.S. but low among staff members, a new report finds. More than three-quarters of people living in long-term care facilities had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 immunization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed on Wednesday. However, when it came to nurses, administrators and others working at centers who were offered the jab, just a little more than one-third had received it. The findings confirm anecdotal reports of nursing home staff members turning down vaccines and feeling they are being treated as 'guinea pigs.' Researchers say more outreach efforts are needed to ensure this vulnerable population that the shot is both safe and effective.   A new CDC report found that nearly 78% precent of nursing home residents have received at least one vaccine dose with half of facilities vaccinating at least 60% of seniors Comparatively, 37.5% of nursing home employees have been vaccinated with most centers inoculating less than 40% of their workforce Nursing home residents and staff members are among...
    New York nursing homes with the lowest staffing levels had more residents die from coronavirus, an investigation by state Attorney General Letitia James found. The AG’s office matched hospital staffing ratings of nursing facilities issued by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services with the state Health Department’s daily reports of nursing home COVID-19 deaths. The same bombshell report released Thursday also claimed Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration publicly undercounted the COVID-19 death toll of nursing home residents by 50 percent. “Nursing home residents died at a higher rate — deaths per average population of residents — in facilities that entered the COVID-19 pandemic with low CMS Staffing ratings. This data reflects that facilities with the highest CMS Staffing ratings had much lower death rates,” the report said. CMS grades facilities from 1 to 5 — with 1 being the worst rating and 5 the best. The report revealed that a stunning 343 of the 589 New York facilities — 55 percent — received poor staffing ratings of level 1 or 2. These nursing homes accounted for 65 percent of...
    More On: Coronavirus in NY Yankee Stadium will finally be a COVID vaccination site — but there’s a catch NYC lays out COVID-19 precautions for Blue Moon Hotel homeless shelter Cuomo’s not off the hook for refusing to release COVID nursing home death data: watchdog What’s love got to do with it? Indoor dining returning to NYC by Valentine’s Day, Cuomo says New York nursing homes with the lowest staffing levels had more residents die from coronavirus, an investigation by state Attorney General Letitia James found. The AG’s office matched hospital staffing ratings of nursing facilities issued by the federal Centers for Medicare Services with the state Health Department’s daily reports of nursing home COVID-19 deaths. The same bombshell report released Thursday also claimed Gov. Cuomo’s administration publicly undercounted the COVID-19 death toll of nursing home residents by 50 percent. “Nursing home residents died at a higher rate – deaths per average population of residents — in facilities that entered the COVID-19 pandemic with low CMS Staffing ratings. This data reflects that facilities with the highest CMS Staffing ratings...
    Nearly a year after it began ravaging the region, coronavirus has infected one in every three Los Angeles County residents, according to the county’s latest estimates. The statistics, released on Wednesday by the county’s Department of Health Services, suggest  a spread much wider than even the county’s own confirmed toll. As of Thursday, the county’s total number of officially confirmed positive cases throughout the year was 975,299, with a seven-day average positivity rate of 18.2% — nearly 1 in every 5. But officials continue to believe that in a region of 10 million people, the virus likely infected many more people who simply have not been tested or exhibited symptoms. Their scientific projections arrived at a one-of-three ratio, or about 3.2 million infections, officials said. The science also suggests that as the virus surges, many more people are increasingly infectious to others. Officials believe that for every reported case, between three and four actual infections have occurred, officials said. And the results, if traditional patterns of behavior during the pandemic hold up, could spur crisis-level demand at hospitals, if the...
    U.S. cities, left behind in COVID-19 aid, look for lifeline in Biden era Ahmaud Arbery case: Attorneys for McMichaels dont want Arbery called victim in court Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress & Anxiety Away Ad Microsoft This is a slam dunk if you want a one-card wallet in 2021 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/10 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life These States Have Had the Slowest Vaccine Rollout Right now, states are kicking off our nation's efforts to roll out the COVID vaccine. So far, more than 13 million doses have been distributed with the intent of inoculating frontline healthcare workers and the long-term care residents. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 4.2 million Americans have received a first shot as of Jan. 2. As experts point out, our nation's sluggish pace of inoculation is disproportionately concentrated in certain states. USA Today reports that...
    (CNN)Nearly half a million residents in the Chinese city where the novel coronavirus first emerged may have been infected with Covid-19 -- almost 10 times its official number of confirmed cases, according to a study by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The study used a sample of 34,000 people in the general population in Wuhan -- the original epicenter of the pandemic -- and other cities in Hubei province, as well as Beijing, Shanghai, and the provinces of Guangdong, Jiangsu, Sichuan and Liaoning to estimate Covid-19 infection rates. The researchers found an antibody prevalence rate of 4.43% for Covid-19 among residents in Wuhan, a metropolis of 11 million people. As of Sunday, Wuhan had reported a total of 50,354 confirmed cases of Covid-19, according to the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission.The study aimed to estimate the scale of past infections in a population by testing blood serum samples from a pool of people for coronavirus antibodies. Its findings are not taken to be final statistics of how many people in a given area have been exposed to the...
    A group of residents in Hamilton, Indiana, went the extra mile and stepped in to help rescue a doe that had fallen through the ice into a frigid lake. In the clip posted Friday on Instagram by Fox News, credited to Storyful, we see two gentlemen out on a small boat with ice pieces floating around them. One of the guys paddles the boat to shore while the other worked hard to keep the doe from slipping under the water. (RELATED: Watch: Great White Shark Surprises Australia Cops [VIDEO]) The outlet captioned its post, “a group of Indiana residents banded together to save a doe that had fallen through thin ice into a frigid lake.”  (RELATED: Watch This Herd Of Cows Help Police Take Down A Car Thief Suspect [VIDEO]) WATCH:   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Fox News (@foxnews) At one point, the guy holding the doe above the water reached down and struggled to lift the animal into the boat. After some serious effort, he finally managed to lift the doe completely...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The season’s first snowfall was unwelcome for shivering tenants inside a New York City Housing Authority complex in the Bronx. The families claim they’ve been without heat since the weekend and say that every time the temperatures drop, their furnace kicks out, CBS2’s Christina Fan reported Wednesday. Rosa Rifas’ patience has reached a boiling point inside her Clason Point home. Her space heater is on the highest setting, her pots and pans are cooking, but the air inside is still frigid cold. The heating in her unit hasn’t worked since Saturday. “You have to wear your coat on, and your hoodie on, and then put socks on. Do you think that’s a way for a human being to live?” Rifas said. MORE: Demanding Answers: Some NYCHA Residents Perplexed They Have Been Living 5 Weeks Without Gas Most of the homes in Clason Point Gardens do have heat, and that is why the eight tenants living in one row of homes are so infuriated. Because their units are located at the end of the development, they were told...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Postal problems have been a side effect of the pandemic – but not in this case. People served by the Mount Greenwood Post Office – which serves the Mount Greenwood neighborhood as well as southwest suburban Alsip and Merrionette Park, and the nearby section of unincorporated Cook County called Garden Homes – told CBS 2’s Suzanne Le Mignot they have had mail problems for more than 18 months. The people who spoke for this story are from different neighborhoods, but they have the same problem. “It’s been a total nightmare,” said Ron Anderson of Alsip. They haven’t gotten mail for several weeks. “Since November 11th, we have not received a carrier at the house,” said Joseph Sperlin of Alsip. “Next week, we’ll be waiting for two checks, and I’m waiting for some insurance bills that have to be paid by the end of the month,” said Lynn Mitchell of Garden Homes. “It’s always been slow here, but not like it is now,” Sperlin said. “Now, it’s just absolutely ridiculous.” All of these people say the Mount...
    ARLINGTON, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – At least eight Tarrant County residents who tested positive for COVID-19 told contact tracers they had attended Dallas Cowboys home games within the last month and a half, health officials said Wednesday. Officials with Tarrant County Public Health told CBS 11 News that this doesn’t mean the individuals were exposed at the games, but rather this was the result of contact tracing protocols. Officials said the exposure to the virus could have happened before or after the games. While the individuals were not identified, health officials said which games they had reported attending: One on Oct. 4 (vs. Browns), three on Oct. 11 (vs. Giants), three on Oct. 19 (vs. Cardinals) and one on Nov. 8 (vs. Steelers). Health officials said fewer than 50% respond to contact tracing calls. The Cowboys have been one of 19 NFL teams that have hosted fans during the season, and owner Jerry Jones said earlier this week that he wants to build on that. “My plan was to increase our fans as we went through the season, and move those...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- Using plasma samples from urgent care centers and a general patient population, researchers from Mount Sinai found that COVID-19 may have been present in New York City as early as mid-February and that nearly 20% of the population had been infected by the virus by April 19, representing approximately 1.7 million residents.A team of researchers from the Mount Sinai Health System conducted antibody tests to look for evidence of past infection using over 10,000 plasma samples from two sets of patients seen in their hospital system. The first "sentinel" set of patients were seen in Mount Sinai's urgent care centers or admitted to the hospital, while the second "screening" set of patients were seen other departments in the health system and were meant to represent the general population.Based on their antibody testing, the authors found that plasma samples from as early as mid-February showed evidence of COVID-19, suggesting that the virus may have been present in New York City earlier than had previously been determined.Nearly 60% of "sentinel" group patients' samples demonstrated evidence of prior infection...
    The mayor of one Morris County town said he was left with no choice but to increase the tax rate on water sewer fees. Come the next quarterly billing cycle, Parsippany-Troy Hills' new 39 percent will show up on the bill. That means residents will be paying approximately $150 a month in the fees. "If I had a choice, there would’ve been no rate increase this year," Mayor Michael Soriano said in a Facebook announcement. "But I did not have a choice. The Council did not have a choice. And if you were in my shoes, you would not have had a choice, either." The Township had been inching closer and closer to a major shortfall in water and sewer utilities, Soriano said. After what he described as an exhausted fiscal analysis, Soriano said "anything less than this action would leave the Township in a disastrous financial position." The last time water and sewer rates increased was in 2006. "First, significantly smaller increases were proposed in 2018 and 2019," Soriano said. "They were not approved.  "This compounded the growing shortfall....
12