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confirmation hearing Tuesday:

    Shalanda Young has emerged as one of the frontrunners to become President Joe Biden’s director of the Office of Management and Budget, with several Republicans already saying they would support her if nominated. Young was originally tapped to be the office’s deputy director, but during her confirmation hearing Tuesday, senators floated that she may ultimately be the one leading the department as Neera Tanden faced continued criticism over her past tweets. “You’ll get my support, maybe for both jobs,” said Republican South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. “Everybody who deals with you on our side has nothing but good things to say. You might talk me out of voting for you, but I doubt it.” “You may be more than deputy,” said Louisiana Republican Sen. John Kennedy. “I don’t expect you to comment on that.” Hours after Tuesday’s hearing, Tanden announced that she had withdrawn her nomination. “Unfortunately, it now seems...
    Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin, a key centrist swing vote, said Wednesday he will vote to confirm Deb Haaland to be President Biden’s Interior secretary, likely paving her way to confirmation. “While we do not agree on every issue, she reaffirmed her strong commitment to bipartisanship, addressing the diverse needs of our country and maintaining our nation’s energy independence,” said Manchin, the chairman of the Energy Committee, which held her confirmation hearing Tuesday and Wednesday. Manchin’s vote to confirm is notable since he’s already vowed to opposed one of Biden’s nominees, Neera Tanden to be director of the Office of Budget and Management. He was non-committal to Haaland before her confirmation hearing. Republicans have lined up in opposition to Haaland because of previous statements she’s made opposing fossil fuel development. During her hearing, Haaland seemed determined to moderate her positions to appease Manchin, who represents the West Virginia, a major coal...
    (CNN)Democratic Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico, who has been nominated by President Joe Biden for interior secretary, is expected to discuss the "historic nature" of her confirmation by the Senate at her confirmation hearing Tuesday. Haaland, who will testify before the the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, would be the first Native American Cabinet secretary if confirmed.Read her remarks, as prepared for delivery Tuesday provided by the Interior Department, below:
    Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for Treasury Secretary, called for "big" action on the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis at her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday. The Senate held confirmation hearings on Tuesday for Yellen and more key members of Mr. Biden's Cabinet. "Economists don't always agree, but I think there is a consensus now: Without further action, we risk a longer, more painful recession now — and long-term scarring of the economy later," Yellen argued. Asked what would provide the biggest "bang for the buck" in economic relief, Yellen replied, "Relief that we provide to those who are in the greatest need and to small businesses have the best chance of providing both relief to those who've been so badly affected by the pandemic and creating a great deal of spending per dollar spent." She said this would "create jobs throughout the economy." Her call to action came...
    President-elect Joe Biden’s Cabinet picks started facing Senate confirmation hearings Tuesday morning, and the first few are slated for an easy approval. Biden’s Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen outlined a broad policy platform in her hearing, promising to focus on the coronavirus pandemic’s devastating economic impact from “day one” and encouraging Congress to pass another relief package. Notably, she pledged to name a “very senior-level” official within the department focused on climate, noting “climate change itself and policies to address it could have major impacts, creating stranded assets, generating large changes in asset prices, credit risks, and so forth that could affect the financial system.” Avril Haines, Biden’s nominee to be director of national intelligence, seemingly faced little opposition as she addressed tension with China and Iran’s nuclear program, The Associated Press reports. Homeland Security Secretary nominee Alejandro Mayorkas meanwhile faced concerns over a 2015 inspector general report contending he...
    Exclusive: Acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine is rising, but so is pessimism about getting back to normal Trump obliterated norms and chipped away at institutions - until the very end Dow kicks off trade 200 points higher Tuesday as investors focus on Biden inauguration, Yellen confirmation hearing © Marketwatch MARKET PULSE U.S. stock benchmarks Tuesday morning rose on the first trading day after a holiday-shortened week, a day ahead of the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden and as fourth-quarter earnings season kicks into higher gear. Investors are awaiting testimony from Janet Yellen, the former Fed chair nominated by Biden to head the Treasury, who is scheduled to testify at her confirmation hearing speak before the Senate Finance Committee at 10 a.m. Eastern, while market participants also are parsing quarterly results from Goldman Sachs Group and Bank of America among others. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 213 points, or 0.7%,...
    Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for Treasury Secretary, will call for "big" action on the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis at her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday, according to prepared remarks obtained by CBS News. The Senate will begin confirmation hearings on Tuesday for Yellen and more key members of Mr. Biden's Cabinet. "Economists don't always agree, but I think there is a consensus now: Without further action, we risk a longer, more painful recession now — and long-term scarring of the economy later," Yellen will say. Her call to action comes just days after Mr. Biden laid out an FDR-style vision for getting the coronavirus under control and tackling the economic crisis that has put millions of people out of work since early last year. "Over the next few months, we are going to need more aid to distribute the vaccine; to reopen schools; to help states keep...
    The Senate is set to consider Janet Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's pick for treasury secretary, next week. The Senate Finance Committee is working to host a hearing on Biden's nomination of Yellen to head the Treasury Department on Tuesday, one day before the incoming president's inauguration, a Senate aide told the Washington Examiner. The aide described next Tuesday as the panel's "target date," pending a committee notice. If confirmed, Yellen, 74, will be the country's first woman to hold the post. Yellen's hearing has been scheduled on the same day as one for Biden's secretary of defense-designate Lloyd Austin before the Senate Armed Services Committee. Austin's nomination, though, won't be as straightforward as Yellen's, with the former Federal Reserve chairwoman earning praise from far-Left Democrats as well as Republicans. Congress also needs to approve a waiver for Austin if he is to take his place atop the Pentagon. U.S....
    As Amy Coney Barrett answered senators' questions for more than 11 hours Tuesday she discussed a number of court cases, some written by her and some by the Supreme Court justices she aims to join by the end of the month, while the Judiciary Committee sought to divine her views on issues from gun rights to abortion.  Some of the cases were household names, like Roe v. Wade, and others were more obscure, like Kanter v. Barr, but all important to understand as the American public gets what will likely be its last glimpse of Barrett speaking publicly before she assumes a lifetime tenure on the highest court in the land.  Here are some of the court cases to know as the Barrett confirmation hearings continue. VideoWHERE HAS AMY CONEY BARRETT RULES ON KEY ISSUES? 1. Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey  Roe v. Wade is the Supreme Court...
    Judge Amy Coney Barrett told the Senate Judiciary Committee that she knew she'd be putting her family through the ringer by saying yes to President Donald Trump's plan to nominate her for the Supreme Court.  'We knew that our lives would be combed over for any negative detail, we knew our faith would be caricatured, our family would be attacked, and so we had to decide whether those difficulties would be worth it,' Barrett said.  Barrett said her family ultimately did, and introduced her six kids who attended Tuesday's hearing, as well as her six siblings.  Judge Amy Coney Barrett introduced her family at Tuesday's hearing including her children (from left, first row) Liam, Vivian, Tess, Juliet, Emma, J.P. and husband Jesse and then siblings (from left, second row) Vivian, Eilieen, Michael, Megan and Amanda. Sister Carrie was seated across the aisle  Amy Coney Barrett's daughter Emma (left), her son...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett held up an empty notepad in response to a question from Republican Texas Sen. John Cornyn during Tuesday morning’s Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings. When it was his turn to speak during Tuesday’s proceedings, Cornyn noticed a difference between what Barrett had in front of her while fielding questions from the senators and what was in front of others in the room. “You know most of us have multiple notebooks and notes and books and things like that in front of us,” Cornyn said. “Can you hold up what you’ve been referring to in answering our questions?” Barrett smiled and held up an empty notepad. WATCH: “Is there anything on it?” he asked. “Uh, that letterhead that says United States Senate,” Barrett responded. (RELATED: ‘Blessed Be The Fruit’: Michael Moore Attacks Amy Coney Barrett With Edited Photo) “That’s impressive,” Cornyn remarked before suggesting...
    Washington (CNN)Democratic and Republican lawmakers will have an opportunity on Tuesday to question President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during the second day of Senate hearings on her nomination, a highly anticipated moment that will mark the next stage in a contentious confirmation fight. Partisan battle lines were quickly drawn on Monday during the first day of hearings in the Senate Judiciary Committee as Democrats and Republicans offered up sharply divergent narratives of the high court fight to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In opening statements delivered on Monday, Republican senators praised Barrett's judicial qualifications in glowing terms and emphasized her capability as a working mom, while Democrats warned that health care protections and the Affordable Care Act are at stake, and under threat, in the nomination fight. Tuesday and Wednesday's hearing sessions in the committee will now allow for...
    President Trump declared on Twitter Tuesday evening that the Senate battle to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court “will be fast and easy.” He made the statement in response to a tweet from Paul Sperry, who predicted the process would be “bloody.” Earlier on Tuesday, President Trump said he asked Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to focus on Barrett’s confirmation rather than stalled negotiations over the next federal coronavirus-relief bill. AMY CONEY BARRETT HEARINGS: HERE ARE THE CORONAVIRUS PRECAUTIONS BEING TAKEN Senate Democrats have pushed back against the nomination, arguing that whoever wins next month’s presidential election should be the one to choose a nominee to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett looks over to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., as they meet with on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, POOL)...
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