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    State-backed hackers’ attempts to steal COVID-19 vaccine data might be farther-reaching than you think. According to Reuters, sources for Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant claim (subscription required) that Russia and China both launched cyberattacks against the European Medicines Agency in December, taking documents for vaccines and treatments in the process. The Russian intruders had access for over a month, the tipsters said, and were interested in the destinations and purchase sizes for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. The Chinese reportedly attacked in the first half of 2020, during the pandemic’s early stages, while Russia followed later that year. The EMA disclosed a breach in December, but it hadn’t named the culprits or provided specific motives. The agency reiterated that a criminal investigation was “ongoing,” but declined to comment on who was involved in the hacks. Russia and China have historically denied any hacking campaigns regardless of evidence. It wouldn’t be surprising if...
    By EDITH M. LEDERER, Associated Press UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United States accused Syrian President Bashar Assad and his close ally Russia on Thursday of trying to block all efforts to hold Damascus accountable for using chemical weapons during attacks on civilians. U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield told the U.N. Security Council that “the Assad regime has tried to avoid accountability by obstructing independent investigations and undermining the role and work of the OPCW,” the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons which is the international chemical weapons watchdog. She accused Russia of defending Assad “despite its chemical weapons attacks,” obstructing independent investigations, and undermining efforts to hold the Syrian government accountable not only for using chemical weapons but for “numerous other atrocities.” OPCW investigators blamed three chemical attacks in 2017 on Assad’s government in April 2020. The OPCW Executive Council responded by demanding that Syria provide details. When it...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United States accused Syrian President Bashar Assad and his close ally Russia on Thursday of trying to block all efforts to hold Damascus accountable for using chemical weapons during attacks on civilians. U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield told the U.N. Security Council that “the Assad regime has tried to avoid accountability by obstructing independent investigations and undermining the role and work of the OPCW,” the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons which is the international chemical weapons watchdog. She accused Russia of defending Assad “despite its chemical weapons attacks,” obstructing independent investigations, and undermining efforts to hold the Syrian government accountable not only for using chemical weapons but for “numerous other atrocities.” OPCW investigators blamed three chemical attacks in 2017 on Assad’s government in April 2020. The OPCW Executive Council responded by demanding that Syria provide details. When it didn’t, France submitted a draft measure...
    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United States accused Syrian President Bashar Assad and his close ally Russia on Thursday of trying to block all efforts to hold Damascus accountable for using chemical weapons during attacks on civilians. U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield told the U.N. Security Council that “the Assad regime has tried to avoid accountability by obstructing independent investigations and undermining the role and work of the OPCW,” the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons which is the international chemical weapons watchdog. She accused Russia of defending Assad “despite its chemical weapons attacks,” obstructing independent investigations, and undermining efforts to hold the Syrian government accountable not only for using chemical weapons but for “numerous other atrocities.” OPCW investigators blamed three chemical attacks in 2017 on Assad’s government in April 2020. The OPCW Executive Council responded by demanding that Syria provide details. When it didn’t, France submitted a draft...
    As Russia stands ready to provide vaccines to 50 million Europeans as of June, the European Medicines Agency begins reviewing Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine.
    The first cases of H5N8 bird flu have been detected in humans, and although there is no known evidence of transmission person-to-person, it serves as an unnerving reminder of disease outbreaks on crowded, unsanitary factory farms. This strain of bird flu is extremely contagious and lethal to birds, but the seven affected human patients in Russia have been reported as asymptomatic. The cases all occurred in farmworkers exposed to birds on the job. Source: ThePrint/YouTube Anna Popova, head of Russia’s Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing, stated that the early warning “gives us all, the entire world, time to prepare for possible mutations and react in an adequate and timely fashion.” Disease outbreaks on modern farms are not uncommon, as genetically similar animals kept in close quarters are likely to spread illness fast. Unsanitary conditions can cause animals to fall into respiratory distress...
    The New York Times His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752. SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky. Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it. “My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.” Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New...
    New York : When last November Russia announced that its coronavirus vaccine was 92% effective, the news was greeted with hope but also with much skepticism. The secrecy that surrounded clinical trials and the “haste” that was criticized by part of the scientific community did not inspire much confidence, not even in the Russians themselves. Today, 3 months after that announcement, things seem to have changed greatly. Little by little, Russians are beginning to trust their vaccine and its efficacy was recently endorsed by the prestigious British medical journal The Lancet. Many countries, especially in Latin America, knock on Russia’s doors to negotiate doses of its promising compound, and Russia has been quick to respond and offer its support. Even in Europe there has been interest in Sputnik. Josep Borrell, high representative of Foreign Policy and Security of the EU, recently assured that the approval for its use...
    He also promised priority access to the Mekong countries (Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam), following criticism that their dams are causing droughts in Southeast Asia. Another case is that of Indonesia, the country with the largest Islamic population in the world, where more than a third of the vaccines produced in China have ended up. Estefan believes that this measure aims to silence criticism of Beijing’s Islamophobia and allegations of human rights violations committed by the Chinese government against the Uighurs, a Muslim minority. Although China will dominate only 15% of the market for vaccines in poor countries, this would mean sales of 2.4 billion euros (2.9 billion dollars), according to an estimate by the Hong Kong company Essence Securities. “Everybody demands a vaccine and Beijing is well positioned to get rich easily,” observes one of its analysts. The global campaign of inoculations needs storage sites...
    By Anton Zverev and Darya Korsunskaya MOSCOW (Reuters) - The Kremlin believes it can easily ride out nationwide protests over the arrest and jailing of opposition politician Alexei Navalny and is ready to authorise the use of more force against demonstrators if necessary, two sources close to it said. Navalny, President Vladimir Putin's most prominent domestic critic, was jailed for nearly three years on Tuesday in a case that has prompted three nationwide protests, strident Western condemnation and talk of sanctions on Moscow. Thousands have been detained, some of Navalny’s key allies are under house arrest or outside Russia, and police have resorted to increasingly harsh tactics, clubbing protesters, and, in some cases, lashing out at journalists. “This is just a warm-up,” the first source said of the police response. “The real adventures definitely come later. A scenario where we see an increasingly forceful reaction across the country is completely realistic."...
    A medical worker fills a syringe with the Gam-COVID-Vac vaccine (under the brand name of Sputnik V) at in Butovo, south Moscow.Sergei Savostyanov | TASS | Getty Images DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Russia's Sputnik V Covid-19 vaccine got a series of boosts on Thursday as Hungary and the United Arab Emirates became the first countries in the European Union and Gulf region, respectively, to register the shot for emergency use.  Hungary's decision was confirmed by President Viktor Orban's spokesperson, who said that if the country agrees on a shipment deal with Moscow, it will become the first European Union country to receive the vaccine. This comes as the country's cases have fallen from a peak of more than 6,000 per day in early December to below 2,000 per day.  "This decision is very important as it demonstrates that the vaccine's safety and efficacy of over 90% are highly regarded...
    Russia will not be able to use its name, flag and anthem at the next two Olympics or at any world championships for the next two years after a ruling Thursday by the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The Lausanne-based court halved the four-year ban proposed last year by the World Anti-Doping Agency in a landmark case that accused Russia of state-ordered tampering of a testing laboratory database in Moscow. The ruling also blocked Russia from bidding to host major sporting events for two years. Russian athletes and teams will still be allowed to compete at next year’s Tokyo Olympics and the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing, as well as world championships including the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, if they are not banned for or suspected of doping. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM One win for Russia is the proposed team name at major events. The...
    Russian athletes won’t be allowed to rock their colors at the next two Olympics. According to the Associated Press, Russia has been banned from using the country’s flag, anthem or colors at the upcoming games in Tokyo and the 2022 winter Olympics in Beijing. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) The decision from the Court of Arbitration for Sport is in response to doping violations. BREAKING: Russia was banned from using it’s name, flag and anthem at the next two Olympics or at any world championships for the next two years. https://t.co/dQT9u5hIvn — The Associated Press (@AP) December 17, 2020 Russian athletes already couldn’t rock their colors at the 2018 games and competed as a squad known as “Olympic Athletes from Russia.” All thoughts on doping aside, this is such a stupid decision. It was a stupid decision in 2018, and it’s...
    Scientists from the United Kingdom and Russia are planning to initiate a trial that would combine the AstraZeneca-Oxford and Sputnik V vaccines in the coming weeks. The trials are set to be held in Russia for those over 18, reported by BBC News, and would be used to survey whether or not immune response would increase if the two vaccines were used together. AstraZeneca-Oxford’s vaccine, which has recently reported promising results from their Phase 3 trial, has reportedly been exploring combinations of different adenovirus vaccines, according to BBC News. #UPDATE Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca’s Russian branch said Friday it would use part of Russia’s homemade Sputnik V vaccine in further clinical trialshttps://t.co/xvSkHKmwF9 — AFP News Agency (@AFP) December 11, 2020 “Combinations of different COVID-19 vaccines may be an important step in generating wider protection through a stronger immune response and better accessibility,” AstraZeneca said in a statement on its website....
    Photo via Andrey Smirnov/Getty Images Russian authorities have launched an investigation after thieves broke in and stole equipment from a top-secret military aircraft designed for use in the event of nuclear conflict. Multiple reports picked up an announcement from Russian state media that the theft took place at the Beriev Taganrog Aviation Scientific and Technical Complex. Officials say that the thieves opened a cargo hatch for the highly-classified Ilyushin-80 planes on site, and one of them is now missing 39 pieces of radio equipment. The Ilyushin-80 is described by media outlets as a “doomsday plane” meant to serve as a mobile command center for President Vladimir Putin and other VIPs to use in case of nuclear war. The aircraft’s design reportedly equips it with life support systems, protective measures for nuclear assault, and specialized tech for maintaining communications with Russia’s armed forces. The precise details of the plane are...
    Vladimir Putin attends the G20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia via video conference on Nov. 21, 2020. Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via The Associated Press Russia has been hailing its trial coronavirus vaccine for months, but the Kremlin says President Vladimir Putin won’t take it yet. “The president cannot use an uncertified vaccine,” Dmitri Peskov, the Kremlin spokesman, said Wednesday. Russia gave “Sputnik V” emergency-use authorization on August 11 and has been giving it to frontline healthcare workers. Putin said at the time that one of his daughters had even taken it. On Wednesday, Russia claimed that “Sputnik V” had shown 95% efficacy in trials and, on Saturday, Putin said Russia was ready to sell it to other countries. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. Russia is hailing its trial coronavirus vaccine, and offering it...
    The issue of crypto regulation is on the table in many countries. For the moment, each country is thinking on its own and developing projects. Recently, Russia communicated on the latest proposed amendments for the regulation of cryptos. A new regulation for cryptos from January 2021 On November 12, 2020, the Russian Ministry of Finance announced the latest amendments that integrate the project to regulate cryptocurrencies in the country. As reported in the Russian business newspaper RBC, the law incorporating these regulations will come into force from January 2021. One of the flagship measures that has been announced concerns the need to report crypto transactions as well as the amount of crypto wallets. Thus, all the people who will perform a amount transactions cumulativees more than 600,000 rubles (6,635 euros) over the calendar year will have to declare it to taxes. While this amount may...
    New research tells the story of Black Washingtonians killed during World War I Walmart recall: Tanimura & Antle romaine lettuce recalled from more than 1,000 Walmart stores over E. coli risk Blockchain Crop-Trading Platform Starts for Broad Use (Bloomberg) -- Cerealia SA launched its blockchain-based physical agriculture trading platform for commercial use, allowing companies to trade wheat, sorghum and other commodities. © Bloomberg A pile of corn during a harvest at a farm in Union Springs, New York, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020. The House Agriculture Committee will return in the 117th Congress to hash out additional coronavirus pandemic aid for farmers and ranchers, and could take action on the long-awaited reauthorization of child nutrition programs and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. The launch followed a series of pilot transactions beginning in 2018. Firms from Japan, Dubai, Ukraine, Turkey, Algeria and Brazil participated in a pre-launch period before...
    By Sam Hoober, Alien Gear Holsters To shoot at a lower price point, a lot of people use steel case ammunition, which is cheaper than brass. While some domestic producers exist, a lot of it is imported surplus ammunition either from Russia or a former Soviet bloc country. Popular brands include the “zoo animals” as they’re often called, including Wolf and Bear, as well as TulAmmo and Barnaul. Again, there are some domestic ammunition companies that make it as well, including Winchester and Blazer. Typical prices before the pandemic usually were something on the order of $1 to $2 cheaper per 50 round box, with steeper discounts for bulk orders of 500 rounds or more. However, the commonly mentioned caveat is that it “hurts your gun.” The story goes that corrosive primer powders will eat the insides of your gun, and the projectile will wear out the throat and rifling due...
    By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - The foreign ministers of Armenia and Azerbaijan arrived in Geneva for talks on Friday to resolve a conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh, where hundreds have been killed in more than a month of fighting. The ministers are set to meet envoys from France, Russia and the United States, co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group charged with resolving a conflict that has escalated in recent days, diplomats in the Swiss city told Reuters. The foreign ministries of Armenia and Azerbaijan both confirmed that their respective ministers had arrived in Geneva. Human rights groups called for an immediate halt to the use of banned weapons after confirming the use of cluster munitions by Armenia in an attack on the Azeri city of Barda. The worst fighting in the South Caucasus for more than 25 years has raised fears of a wider war that could suck in Russia and...
    By creating its own monetary and financial system, an economic and trade bloc backed by Russia is looking to reduce its reliance on the US dollar and euro for internal trading and in deals with China. The Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU), a counterpart to the European Union, has five member states – Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Russia – and ensures the free flow of goods and economic cooperation among them, but it does not have a single currency like the 19 of the 27 EU states do. The union has also cultivated a close relationship with China, which has been expanding its influence in Eurasia via the Belt and Road Initiative. Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China. Sergei Glazyev, the union’s minister of integration and macroeconomics and a former adviser to Russian President Vladimir Putin, said on...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - The Belarus Interior Ministry is checking reports of gunfire during clashes between security services and protesters, Russia's RIA news cited it as saying on Sunday. Protesters gathering ahead of an ultimatum demanding President Alexander Lukashenko resign by midnight on Sunday clashed with police en route to the Independence Palace in Minsk. Security services used at least 10 stun grenades to disperse the crowd, Russian news agencies cited their correspondents at the scene as saying. The interior ministry confirmed that riot control weapons had been deployed, the TASS news agency reported. (Reporting by Polina Ivanova; Editing by Catherine Evans) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Asia, Belarus, Europe, Latvia
    WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence agencies are accusing Iran and Russia of trying to use voter registration data in “desperate attempts” to sow chaos and confusion ahead of the November 3 U.S. presidential election.      Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe made the announcement during a hastily called news conference late Wednesday, seeking to reassure Americans and promising to inflict “costs and consequences” on any country caught meddling.      “We have confirmed that some voter registration information has been obtained by Iran, and separately, by Russia,” he said, adding both countries “have taken specific actions to influence public opinion relating to our elections.”      Ratcliffe did not say how Russia was using the information but blamed Iranian cyber actors for being behind a flurry of activity over the previous 24 hours, saying some of it appeared to be designed to hurt U.S. President Donald Trump.       “We have already seen...
    The U.S. intelligence community says Iran and Russia have sent fake emails using stolen voter registration data to provoke unrest and undermine the integrity of the 2020 election campaign. At a late press conference, Donald Trump’s Director of National Intelligence John Radcliffe and FBI Director Christopher Ware said both countries had taken specific measures to influence public opinion in the election. “They believe it will cause chaos, sow confusion, and undermine your confidence in American democracy,” Mr Radcliffe said. He said he would send stolen data fraud emails in an attempt to damage Mr Trump and send videos that could have rigged fraudulent votes from abroad. Neither Mr. Radcliffe nor Mr. Vere took any questions. Shortly before the announcement, Washington Post This week, Iran said it was behind threats to emails from Democratic voters claiming it came from “proud boys” and that the group “had all your information.”See also“Will you...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia has authorised its defence ministry to open an office in Serbia, a government document showed, as Moscow pushes to expand military ties with its traditional Balkans ally even as Belgrade seeks to join the European Union. Serbia last month suspended military drills with foreign troops for six months, citing pressure from the EU to withdraw from joint exercises with Russia and Belarus. The Russian government order, dated Oct. 15 and signed by Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin, said the head of the proposed office would assist in resolving military and technical questions over Russian-Serbian cooperation. The agreement, once signed by both parties, would give the Russian official in Serbia the right to visit Serbian divisions that use Russian weapons and military equipment, provided prior notice and consent were given. Officials from Serbia's defence ministry could not be immediately reached for comment. Serbia, whose military is based on...
    BERLIN (Reuters) - Prosecutors have charged two Germans suspected of selling machinery to a Russian state-owned armaments group that manufactures missile systems for the Russian army. The Federal Prosecutor's Office (GBA) said on Tuesday it has filed charges against the men, identified as Alexander S. and Alexander O. under German privacy laws, for allegedly "acting commercially for the secret service of a foreign power". The indictment comes amid friction between Germany and Russia following the poisoning of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny, which Chancellor Angela Merkel has demanded Moscow explain. Alexander S. is charged with selling machine tools for around 8 million euros ($9.4 million) to a state-owned armaments group that manufactures missile systems for the Russian army in the period from Jan. 2016 to Jan. 2018. Prosecutors said Alexander S. exported the tools to Russia in seven deliveries and deceived Germany's export control authorities by specifying sham recipients and falsifying...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Tens of thousands of people marched through the streets of the Belarusian capital Minsk on Sunday to demand the resignation of veteran president Alexander Lukashenko, despite a threat by officials to use firearms against protesters. Belarus, a former Soviet republic closely allied with Russia, has been rocked by strikes and weekly street protests since authorities announced that Lukashenko, who has ruled in authoritarian fashion since 1994, had secured re-election on Aug. 9 with 80% of votes. The Interfax news agency put the number of protesters at over 30,000. It said about 50 had been detained by the police, and that the mobile broadband signal had been disrupted in parts of the city. It also said loud noises that sounded like stun grenades had been heard close to the march. A senior police official said last week that officers would reserve the right to use firearms against demonstrators....
    BRUSSELS – European Union foreign ministers agreed Monday to impose sanctions on Russian officials and organizations blamed for the poisoning of opposition leader Alexei Navalny with a Soviet-era nerve agent. At a meeting in Luxembourg, France and Germany urged their EU partners to freeze the assets of those suspected of involvement and ban them from traveling in Europe under sanctions to combat the use and spread of chemical weapons. “It was a complete acceptance by all member states,” EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell told reporters after the talks. "Everybody was supporting this proposal.” Borrell provided no details about who might face sanctions or when the measures might come into force, but said that technical work on preparing the action will now proceed. Navalny, an anti-corruption investigator and major political opponent of Russian President Vladimir Putin, fell ill on Aug. 20 during a domestic flight in Russia. He was...
    BERLIN (Reuters) - The European Union needs a common approach when it comes to deal with Russia but should never stop dialogue, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said at a conference in Bratislava. The EU should speak a very clear language when dealing with Russia in cases like the poisoning of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny but never forget that Russia was needed to solve global crises. "We need to be able to play hardball but at the same time we must never let dialogue be stopped," Maas said, according to a translation into English. "We need Russia to solve the conflicts in Syria, in Libya, in the Ukraine." (Reporting by Kirsti Knolle; editing by Thomas Seythal) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia's foreign ministry said on Wednesday that Syrian and Libyan fighters from illegal armed groups were being sent to the Nagorno-Karabakh region, where fierce fighting has raged for the past four days between Azerbaijan and ethnic Armenian forces. Russia called on the countries involved to prevent the use of "foreign terrorists and mercenaries" in the conflict. Two Syrian rebel sources have told Reuters that Turkey is sending Syrian rebel fighters to support Azerbaijan, which Turkey and Azerbaijan have denied. (Reporting by Polina Ivanova; Editing by Mark Trevelyan) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    PARIS (Reuters) - France's president on Tuesday demanded an immediate explanation from Russia over the poisoning of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny, warning that Paris would not allow its red lines on the use of chemical weapons to be crossed. "We will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons in Europe, in Russia or in Syria," Emmanuel Macron told the U.N. General Assembly. "This clarification must be swift and flawless because we will enforce our red lines," Macron said. The Kremlin has denied any involvement. Macron did not elaborate on what would be done if Russia did not provide satisfactory explanations. (Reporting by John Irish and Michel Rose; Editing by Alison Williams) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty This is a joint investigation by The Daily Beast and the Dossier Center. Six men await trial in Moscow and Buenos Aires, charged with operating one of the craziest, most ambitious narco-trafficking rings in history. Russia’s embassy in Argentina was the storage depot and Russian government transport was intended to move a cartel-sized consignment of virtually uncut cocaine from South America to Moscow. It was a transnational crime that astounded and confused the world, not least because authorities allege it was carried out by a small but resourceful cabal including one dirty embassy employee, one corrupt cop, and one charismatic chameleon who used some of the most secure Russian state real estate to store and smuggle $60 million worth of drugs.  According to the official narrative, they did it all right under the noses of innocent diplomats and intelligence officers—and they would have...
    Reuters September 17, 2020 0 Comments FBI Director Christopher Wray on Thursday warned that Russia is interfering in the 2020 U.S. presidential elections with a steady stream of misinformation aimed at Democrat Joe Biden as well as sapping Americans’ confidence in the election process. Moscow is also attempting to undercut what it sees as an anti-Russian U.S. establishment, the head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation told the Democratic-led House of Representatives’ Homeland Security committee. He said his biggest concern is a “steady drumbeat of misinformation” that he said he feared could undermine confidence in the result of the 2020 election. Wray’s testimony follows an Aug. 7 warning by the director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center that Russia, China and Iran were all trying to interfere in the Nov. 3 election. Multiple reviews by U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia acted to boost now-President Donald Trump’s...
    By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - FBI Director Christopher Wray on Thursday warned that Russia is interfering in the 2020 U.S. presidential elections with a steady stream of misinformation aimed at Democrat Joe Biden as well as sapping Americans' confidence in the election process. Moscow is also attempting to undercut what it sees as an anti-Russian U.S. establishment, the head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation told the Democratic-led House of Representatives' Homeland Security committee. He said his biggest concern is a "steady drumbeat of misinformation" that he said he feared could undermine confidence in the result of the 2020 election. Wray's testimony follows an Aug. 7 warning by the director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center that Russia, China and Iran were all trying to interfere in the Nov. 3 election. Multiple reviews by U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia acted to boost now-President Donald Trump's 2016...
    The Russian Foreign Ministry issued a statement on Wednesday that accused the German government of “stonewalling” on the health of Alexei Navalny, the Russian opposition leader poisoned with Novichok nerve agent according to German doctors — a chemical weapon Russia has employed in previous assassination attempts. The Foreign Ministry said Germany is running an information operation to set the Russians up for more sanctions, as related by Russia’s state TASS news agency: “Amid the German authorities’ unconstructive approach, unfounded attacks against Russia continue,” the ministry stated. “A massive misinformation campaign has been launched that clearly shows that its initiators see the key task not in taking care about Navalny’s health and establishing the real reasons for his hospitalization, but in mobilizing the sanctions sentiment,” it said. The ministry noted that Russia had been demanding that Germany provide data on Navalny’s medical examination, including on the results of biochemical tests in...
    The Department of Homeland Security held back on releasing an intelligence warning to law enforcement agencies that Russia was pushing out political attacks on Democrat Joe Biden's mental health – a line that President Trump himself has promoted, it was revealed Wednesday. After receipt of the bulletin citing 'allegations about the poor mental health' of Biden, a senior aide advised to withhold its release pending review by DHS head Chad Wolf, who is serving in an acting capacity. He is now Trump's nominee to lead the agency but lacks Senate confirmation.  The draft bulletin being circulated was titled: 'Russia Likely to Denigrate Health of US Candidates to Influence 2020 Election,' and was intended to alert law enforcement to keep on the lookout, according to ABC News, which obtained internal emails about the document.   In the document, U.S. analysts stated their 'high confidence' that 'Russian malign influence actors are likely to continue...
    The United States military on Saturday accused Russian fighter pilots of conducting an ‘unsafe and unprofessional’ intercept of a nuclear-capable B-52 bomber that was conducting ‘routine operations’ over the Black Sea on Friday morning. According to a statement from the Air Force, two Russian Su-27 jets crossed to within 100ft of the nose of the B-52 multiple times as the US bomber flew over international airspace. The US military said the Russian pilots’ shift to afterburner mode caused turbulence for the American aircraft, limiting the pilot’s ability to maneuver. In modern aviation, when pilots activate afterburners, it injects fuel directly into the exhaust stream of a turbine engine, increasing the thrust so that the aircraft can accelerate. Video released by the Russian Ministry of Defense shows an American B-52 bomber being intercepted over the Black Sea on Friday morning The Russian government claims that the B-52 was flying...
    Pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca might be granted an emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a new report. The vaccine, being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University, could receive authorization as early as October, the Financial Times (FT) reported. “The Trump administration is considering bypassing normal US regulatory standards to fast-track an experimental coronavirus vaccine from the UK for use in America ahead of the presidential election, according to three people briefed on the plan,” FT reported. “One option being explored to speed up the availability of a vaccine would involve the US Food and Drug Administration awarding “emergency use authorisation” (EUA) in October to a vaccine being developed in a partnership between AstraZeneca and Oxford university, based on the results from a relatively small UK study if it is successful, the people said.” But Fortune reported that “AstraZeneca says it has held...
    China is dangling early access to a coronavirus vaccine it hopes to develop to select countries as Beijing tries to shore up relationships strained by the pandemic, according to a report. China’s Foreign Ministry notified the Philippines that it would have priority access to a COVID vaccine, and Sinovac Biotech Ltd., a private Chinese firm, will work with Brazil and Indonesia to produce hundreds of millions of doses for their use, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday. China also worked out a deal with Pakistan, one of its closest allies, to allow China National Pharmaceutical Group to conduct clinical trials in the country in exchange for receiving doses to distribute to about a fifth of its 220 million population, the report said. Russia could also produce a vaccine developed by China’s military if the Russian health ministry gives its approval. Of the six vaccine candidates in the final stages of...
    RUSSIA has vowed to treat any missile fired towards it as a nuclear attack and promises to respond by firing its own nukes, warn top brass. The threat was published in an official military newspaper and is directed at the US, which has been developing long-range non-nuclear weapons. 15An Aleksin small anti-submarine ship launches a missile during a military paradeCredit: Getty Images - Getty 15T-34-85 tanks and SU-100 self-propelled artillery guns drive down Vasilyevsky Spusk SquareCredit: Alamy Live News 15Russia's President Vladimir Putin speaks during a military paradeCredit: Alamy Live News “Any attacking missile will be perceived as carrying a nuclear warhead,” the article in Krasnaya Zvezda (Red Star) said last week. “The information about the missile launch will be automatically relayed to the Russian military-political leadership, which will determine the scope of retaliatory action by nuclear forces depending on the evolving situation," it added. The article follows the...
    VIDEO5:2005:20Russia wealth fund head: Sputnik V vaccine could be delivered by November or DecemberSquawk Box Europe Russia has been working on its coronavirus vaccine effectively for the past six years, according to the head of the country's sovereign wealth fund, with a potential rollout expected before the end of the year. On Tuesday, Russia announced that it had registered a coronavirus vaccine, making it the first country to do so.  There are doubts over its efficacy and safety, however, given that it is still to go through larger-scale Phase 3 clinical trials, and that no data has been published from earlier clinical trials carried out in less than two months. Russia said its work in recent years on developing a vaccine for Ebola and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) had helped it to create a vaccine against the new coronavirus, a virus that emerged in China in late 2019 and one...
    Blockchain in India? On August 10, 2020, the Election Commission (EC) of India discussed how to organize a vote in the context of the coronavirus pandemic. The commission proposed to use the blockchain technology as a solution for a remote vote. Election Commissioner Sushil Chandra asserted that if a blockchain solution is to be used, it must also be clear and transparent as possible for voters. Thus, Indian Journal of Research describes India’s electoral system as corrupt where the votes of voters are sometimes bought. In addition, some citizens find it difficult to get around or have no means of transport. If remote voting is allowed, the use of blockchain could facilitate the participation of voters who cannot make it to the polling station. Secretary General Umesh Sinha said: “It remains to be seen which blockchain is safe, secure, scalable and reliable enough to meet the challenge? “ ????...
    WASHINGTON - Americans heading to the polls or even mailing in their ballots for the upcoming U.S. presidential election in November should feel confident their votes will be recorded correctly, according to the one of the officials in charge of organizing election security. "I've said it before, and I'll say it again. The 2020 election will be the most secure election in modern history," Chris Krebs, the director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, said Friday. Krebs, speaking during a Brookings Institution webinar on election integrity, said Russia’s attempts to meddle in the 2016 presidential election served as a wake-up call and that his agency has been able to build on measures put in place for the 2018 midterm elections. Those measures include the use of sensors to detect possible intrusions into critical computer systems and networks, like voter registration databases, as well as the increasing use...
    MOSCOW (AP) - President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday endorsed Russia’s nuclear deterrent policy which allows him to use atomic weapons in response to a conventional strike targeting the nation’s critical government and military infrastructure. By including a non-nuclear attack as a possible trigger for Russian nuclear retaliation, the document appears to send a warning signal to the U.S. The new expanded wording reflects Russian concerns about the development of prospective weapons that could give Washington the capability to knock out key military assets and government facilities without resorting to atomic weapons. In line with Russian military doctrine, the new document reaffirms that the country could use nuclear weapons in response to a nuclear attack or an aggression involving conventional weapons that “threatens the very existence of the state.” TOP STORIES Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges Even staunch allies scold U.S. amid...
    MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday endorsed Russia’s nuclear deterrent policy which allows him to use atomic weapons in response to a conventional strike targeting the nation’s critical government and military infrastructure. By including a non-nuclear attack as a possible trigger for Russian nuclear retaliation, the document appears to send a warning signal to the U.S. The new expanded wording reflects Russian concerns about the development of prospective weapons that could give Washington the capability to knock out key military assets and government facilities without resorting to atomic weapons. In line with Russian military doctrine, the new document reaffirms that the country could use nuclear weapons in response to a nuclear attack or an aggression involving conventional weapons that “threatens the very existence of the state.” But the policy document now also offers a detailed description of situations that could trigger the use of nuclear weapons. They include...
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