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    By Shawna Mizelle | CNN In honor of Veterans Day, congressional Democrats reintroduced legislation Thursday that would provide GI Bill benefits to descendants of Black World War II veterans. The GI Bill Restoration Act was introduced in the House by Majority Whip Jim Clyburn of South Carolina and Democratic Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts. Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia is set to introduce the legislation in the Senate, according to a news release on Clyburn’s website. “While the original GI Bill ushered in decades of prosperity for post-war America, access to this prosperity was limited for Black World War II veterans who were denied full access to these benefits by mostly-white state and local Veterans Administrations,” the release said. If passed, the bill would extend to descendants and surviving spouses of Black WWII veterans access to the VA Loan Guaranty Program, which provides assistance for buying and building homes, and the Post-911 GI Bill educational assistance, which provides financial assistance for school or job training. The legislation also establishes a Blue Ribbon Panel “to study inequities in the distribution...
    The Florida Board of Education (BOE) approved a rule in June that mandates K-12 public schools teach American history based on “universal principles stated in the Declaration of Independence” and bans “critical race theory” (CRT) from being taught. The original rule, based on an executive order issued by Gov. Ron DeSantis, barred teachers from attempting “to indoctrinate or persuade students to a particular point of view” but never mentioned CRT. The rule ultimately adopted by the BOE excludes the “indoctrinate” language but cites CRT in outlawing “fiction or theory masquerading as facts, such as critical race theory” in K-12 schools. But there’s still too much CRT indoctrinating going on, says Rep. Randy Fine, R-Palm Bay, who is calling on Florida lawmakers to expand and codify DeSantis’ order and the BOE rule banning it when they convene Jan. 11 for their 2022 legislative session. Fine and Rep. Jason Fischer, R-Jacksonville, on Aug. 30 pre-filed House Bill 57 for the 2022 session, which seeks to ban use of CRT in training, policy or any activity in K-12 public schools, all 12 public...
    Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) speaks to reporters following a Senate Democratic luncheon at the U.S. Capitol on June 15, 2021 in Washington, DC.Kevin Dietsch | Getty Images Senate Democrats took their first step toward passing a $3.5 trillion spending plan as the party forges ahead with a massive economic agenda. The Democratic-held chamber approved a budget resolution in a party-line vote. The measure directs committees to craft a bill that would spend up to $3.5 trillion on climate initiatives, paid leave, child care, education and health care. It marks the first step in the budget reconciliation process, which will allow Democrats to approve their plan without a Republican vote in the Senate split 50-50 by party. The GOP has united against the proposal and the tax increases on corporations and wealthy individuals Democrats plan to use to pay for it. The vote to approve the resolution follows Senate passage of a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill Tuesday. Democrats see the bipartisan plan and their reconciliation bill as two complementary planks of an agenda that aims to create jobs,...
    Colorado Rep. Jason Crow. Two dozen bipartisan legislators have introduced a new bill that would expand and expedite the visa program for Afghans who aided U.S. military and will be at risk when our forces leave Afghanistan by September 2021. The ALLIES Act, introduced by the House’s Honoring Our Promises Working Group, would increase the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) cap by 8,000, as well as safely “remove burdensome” requirements that have slowed the application process. “When I served in Iraq and Afghanistan, I worked closely with local translators and contractors who were critical to our safety and the success of our mission,” said Colorado Rep. Jason Crow. “They performed this service at great risk to themselves and their families, but with the understanding that the U.S. would stand by them. Now it is time for the U.S. to honor our promises and protect our Afghan partners.” Crow’s office said that the ALLIES Act would “increase the Afghan SIV cap by an additional 8,000 visas,” as well as “remove the requirement for a ‘credible sworn statement’ regarding the threat applicants face for having worked for or on behalf of the U.S....
    Jennifer Lopez Steps Out in What Looks Like Ben Afflecks Shirt Inflation scare? Look at this chart before freaking out Each week of the WNBA season, we'll go "All In" on five topics that are worth a closer look and preview what is upcoming. © Provided by Yahoo! Sports (Graphic by Amber Matsumoto/Yahoo Sports) Walk into any arena around the country, professional, collegiate or high school, and you'll see a trophy case, retired jerseys and scores of memorabilia. It's a mini-museum of history ahead of a sporting event That isn't the case for the Houston Comets, the first WNBA dynasty and a beloved franchise that folded in 2008 despite winning the first four championships in league history. The Comets helped build the WNBA, and when it comes to expansion, they are often mentioned first. "Every time I think about a fact that Houston no longer has a team, it infuriates me," Sheryl Swoopes, a former Comets standout and three-time MVP, told Yahoo Sports. "It’s hard for me to look at an organization, a franchise who won the first four...
    Moderna Inc has asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expand emergency use of its COVID-19 vaccine to Americans between ages 12 and 17. When the vaccine was originally authorized for use by the FDA in December 2020, it was only for those aged 18 and older.  However, recent phase III clinical trial data showed no children who were given the immunization fell ill with the virus within 14 of their second dose while four children given the placebo later tested positive. According to Moderna this is 'consistent with a vaccine efficacy of 100 percent.' It comes exactly four weeks after Pfizer-BioNTech received approval from the FDA to administer its vaccine to children between ages 12 and 15.   Moderna Inc has asked the FDA to expand emergency use of its COVID-19 vaccine to Americans between ages 12 and 17. Pictured: A healthcare worker holds a vial of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine at a pop-up vaccination site in New York City, January 29 This is a breaking news story and will be updated. 
    For 10 years, I acted as my father’s in-home dialysis provider, and having the chance to be there for him was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. While he passed away last year, I’ve been able to channel that energy into helping and educating other patients who are in the same position he was. Caring for my father, along with my experiences as a nurse and my recent schooling to become a health education specialist, opened my eyes to a lot of disparities affecting our health system that have serious ramifications for dialysis patients. So many patients simply don’t have access to the coverage they need – or even information on how to get it – that they end up with devastating bills if Medicare doesn’t cover medication or treatment they need. I’m encouraged, though, to see that Congress is working on a bill to help. The Jack Reynolds Memorial Medigap Expansion Act would expand coverage for the gap left by what Medicare doesn’t cover to dialysis patients under 65, many of whom can’t get that coverage...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — With much of the Bay Area already built out, it is a challenge to find places to create much-needed housing. But a bill in the state legislature would make it easier to build homes in commercial areas such as shopping malls. The Hilltop Mall in Richmond isn’t really a mall at all anymore. Its main anchor stores Macy’s, Sears and JC Penney closed up years ago. READ MORE: EDD Fraud: Federal Judge Issues Sweeping Injunction Against Bank of America It’s not so bleak at Stonestown Galleria in San Francisco, but inside, there are currently a number of vacant storefronts. “A lot of people that I know just shop online, honestly. Or they find cheaper options online,” said Jennifer Gonzalez. She and Valerie Varrigan are students at nearby SF State University. There is a proposal by the mall’s owners to turn the property into a town-center setting, adding 3,000 housing units to the mall’s vast parking lots. “I think it’s really interesting that we’re trying to use the resources that we already have, creating housing for people...
    FRANKFORT, Ill. (CBS) — Imagine building your dream home with the money you save for years, only to have your backyard end up on the cusp of becoming a highway. As CBS 2 Political Investigator Dana Kozlov reported Thursday night, that is what is poised to happen to some homeowners from south suburban Frankfort – who say Will County has no plans to build a buffer. READ MORE: eBay Antique Print Retailer Says Postal Problems At Elk Grove Village Processing Plant Are Bad News For Her Business For kids in the Frankfort subdivision, their backyard is their playground – their safe place. But their parents say plans to expand Laraway Road, right behind their homes, will put that safe place in peril. “Even the safety of our kids – we’re concerned about cars coming through the backyard,” said Jennifer Bandes, a homeowner and parent. Bandes said Will County’s current plans to widen Laraway Road from two to four lanes would swallow 16 feet of their land – eliminating a berm and a row of 15-year-old trees currently serving as a...
    PITTSBURGH, PA (KDKA) – Where alcohol can be sold is a topic of conversation that has continued in Pennsylvania for years. “Now is the time to bring it into the 21st century,” said Rep. Tim O’Neal from Washington County. READ MORE: New Numbers Show Westmoreland County Is Making Strides In Getting Community Vaccinated Until a few years ago, you couldn’t walk into a Giant Eagle to get any alcohol. Now most locations sell some beer or wine, but when the liquor stores closed during the pandemic, business took a hit. “For us being right here on the border of West Virginia and Ohio we saw plenty of our residents cross the border to buy liquor during the pandemic,” O’Neal said. According to O’Neal, Pennsylvania has the second strictest liquor laws in the country. It’s a concept that has left people wondering why for years. “How many other states you can already buy it in gas stations? You can buy it in Target or a grocery store, it makes more sense,” said Danieka Suggs. READ MORE: Crews On Scene Of Baldwin...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) — The Florida House is poised to pass a proposal that would greatly expand eligibility for the state’s school-voucher programs, as opponents argue the expansion would shrink funding for public schools. The House on Tuesday took up the proposal (HB 7045), positioning it for a vote on Wednesday. READ MORE: COVID In Florida: 5,645 New Cases, 67 Deaths Reported On Tuesday The measure, in part, would consolidate the Gardiner and McKay scholarship programs, which serve students with special needs, with the Family Empowerment Scholarship program, which serves a broader population of low- to middle-income families. It also would remove a requirement that students receiving vouchers be previously enrolled in public schools. That would open up eligibility to home-schooled students, for instance, to receive vouchers. The proposal also would make siblings of students currently receiving vouchers and children of military members eligible to receive vouchers. “What this bill does is three things: It’s going to make more children eligible for school choice, it’s going to provide them with more money for their school choice options, and it is going...
    WASHINGTON -- House and Senate Democrats plan to introduce legislation Thursday to expand the Supreme Court from the current nine justices to 13, a bill that liberal interests groups have been expecting for some time.President Joe Biden recently announced a commission to study the expansion of the court, signing an executive order last week creating a 36-member bipartisan panel to report back within six months on increasing the number of justices and potential term limits.Progressive Democrats claim the bill is necessary to restore the balance of the highest court.In a statement, Sen. Edward Markey, D-MA, said of the legislation he has co-sponsored with House Judiciary Cmte Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-NY, "I welcome President Biden's announcement, but after years of Republicans upending precedent, breaking their own rules, and stealing seats on the Supreme Court in order to use it as a political pawn, we need more than a commission to restore integrity to the Court. We need to abolish the filibuster and expand the Supreme Court."Republicans are already firing back, blasting so-called "court-packing" and calling the bill an overreach.EMBED More News...
    Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., speaks at a Senate Finance Committee hearing at the U.S. Capitol on Feb. 25, 2021.Tasos Katopodis | Getty Images News | Getty Images A Senate bill introduced Wednesday would broadly reform the U.S. unemployment system, seeking to plug gaps in the safety net for jobless Americans in response to the Covid pandemic and put states on a more equal footing. The legislation would raise the amount and duration of unemployment benefits, and expand the pool of workers who qualify for aid. It's sponsored by Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., chair of the Finance Committee, and Michael Bennet, D-Colo. More from Personal Finance:Here's how Americans are using their $1,400 stimulus checksCollege internships are back and pay even more than beforeNew $3,000 child tax credit to start payments in July, IRS says The bill, the Unemployment Insurance Modernization Act, would also make the self-employed, gig workers, new graduates and others a permanent fixture of the unemployment safety net. Such workers, who are typically ineligible for state aid, would qualify for a $250 weekly Jobseeker Allowance benefit,...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. The Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee advanced a proposal Friday to expand the number of early voting centers in the state for future elections. House Bill 745, sponsored by House Majority Leader Eric G. Luedtke (D-Montgomery), would increase the number of early voting centers required in counties based on the number of registered voters in those jurisdictions. Under the state’s current law, counties with less than 125,000 voters are required to have just one early voting center; counties with between 125,000 and 200,000 are required to have three early voting centers; counties with 200,000 to 300,000 voters are required to have four early voting centers; counties with 300,000 to 450,000 are required to have seven early voting centers; and counties with more than 450,000 registered voters are required to have 11 early voting centers. Luedtke’s bill would broaden that formula, and require that counties: With less than 50,000 registered voters have one early voting center;...
    Washington (CNN)The House is set to vote Thursday on legislation that would expand background checks on all commercial gun sales, marking the first congressional move on significant gun control since Democrats won the White House and the majority in both chambers of Congress.The Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021, H.R. 8, would expand background checks for all firearm sales or transfers in the country. Currently, background checks are not required for gun sales and transfers by unlicensed and private sellers. The legislation has three Republican cosponsors -- Reps. Fred Upton of Michigan, Chris Smith of New Jersey and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania. Separate legislation, H.R. 1446, introduced by Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina and called the Enhanced Background Checks Act of 2021, would close what's known as the "Charleston Loophole," which allows some licensed gun sales to go through before a required background check is done. Using that loophole, Dylann Roof was able to legally purchase a firearm to kill nine people at a historically Black church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015."These people who were practicing their...
    Editorial: Gaming / Facebook / Twitter / YouTube / Instagram / News / Discord / Forums Sony promised several options to increase the storage of PlayStation 5. However, the console debuted without the possibility of using external SSD drives, as its drive is disabled for now. Next-gen titles have grown in weight significantly, so console users are eagerly awaiting ways to expand their system storage, especially for owners of a PlayStation 5 without a disc drive. According to recent reports, Sony is already preparing everything to enable support and thus be able to use external storage units on PlayStation 5. If the information is accurate, this will happen in a few months through an update. Find out: download Final Fantasy VII Remake and 3 more titles with PS Plus in March Sony prepares update to increase PS5 storage According to a Bloomberg report (via Kotaku), Sony will allow PlayStation 5 users to expand their console storage sometime in the summer. Thus, it would be between June and September that the support would be enabled. Sources point out that...
    Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives pose for a photograph holding LBGT+ and Transgender Pride flags on the steps of the U.S. Capitol ahead of a vote on the Equality Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 25, 2021.Tom Brenner | Reuters The House on Thursday passed legislation that would extend existing civil rights law to include sexual orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics. The bill would ensure equal treatment for LGBTQ individuals in areas including employment, education, housing, credit, public accommodations and others. "The time has come to extend the blessings of liberty and equality to all Americans, regardless of who they are or who they love," Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., who introduced the bill, said on the House floor. The House voted 224 to 206 to pass the legislation largely along party lines. All Democrats and three Republicans voted in favor of the bill. The legislation now moves to the Senate, where it will require at least 10 Republican votes to avoid a Senate filibuster and move the bill to a vote. As of...
    Every House Democrat has signed onto a new voting rights act that would expand early voting, create automatic voting registration systems, and simplify voting by mail as some of its many reforms. And, in a swipe at former President Donald Trump, the bill also requires all the presidential nominees to disclose 10 years of their tax returns. It would also give Washington D.C. statehood, which would give the heavily Democratic federal city two Senators, a member of Congress and the ability to self-govern.  The legislation, which runs 791 pages, is packed with Democratic priorities and was given their top priority, labeled with the Number 1: H.R. 1, The For the People Act. Every House Democrat has signed onto a new voting rights act that would expand early voting and create automatic voting registration systems - above voters line up to cast their ballots in New York Democracy Reform Task Force Chair Rep. John Sarbanes of Maryland announced Monday that all 221 Democrats in the House of Representatives are supporting the measure. 'House Democrats are united in our steadfast commitment to...
    (CNN)The latest House coronavirus relief legislation would make more people eligible for Affordable Care Act subsidies for two years, temporarily fulfilling one of President Joe Biden's campaign promises.The bill, introduced this week by House Ways and Means Committee chair Rep. Richard Neal, would make the federal premium subsidy more generous and would eliminate the maximum income cap. Bidens First 100 Days Biden hopes Trump's impeachment won't derail agenda DOJ to ask Trump-appointed US attorneys to resign Democrats unveil $3,000 child benefit as part of Biden relief package Part of Biden's $1.9 trillion relief package, the two moves would make buying policies on Obamacare exchanges more affordable for many middle class Americans, who have long been shut out of federal premium assistance because they earn too much. Enrollees would pay no more than 8.5% of their income towards coverage, down from nearly 10% now. Also, those earning more than the current cap of 400% of the federal poverty level -- about $51,000 for an individual and $104,800 for a family of four in 2021 -- would become eligible for help....
    A new bill aims to help victims of violent crime in D.C. both financially and emotionally. The Expanding Supports for Crime Victims Amendment Act of 2021 would expand eligibility for victim compensation, create new “crime victim advocates” for certain serious crimes and strengthen the District’s hospital-based violence intervention programs, according to a news release. Council Member Charles Allen, who represents Ward 6 — which encompasses Capitol Hill and the surrounding neighborhoods — introduced the legislation Monday. Allen chairs the Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety for the D.C. Council. “Hospital-based interventions are an effective part of the District’s violence interruption work, engaging with victims at the hospital with serious injuries like gunshot or stabbing wounds where a retaliatory act is far more likely without intervention,” the release said. “Crime victims need safety and healing to move forward,” Allen said. “That doesn’t happen automatically in our criminal justice system. This is an opportunity to take more of a public health approach to supporting victims, and it will help us reduce gun violence, by treating trauma and violence like a contagious...
    Virginia National Guard corporal charged in connection with Capitol riot While Hollywood looked for perfect villains, they were hiding in plain sight The congressional bill that would expand college athletes’ rights, explained The age-old debate over whether college athletes should get paid is still alive and well. But in this game of tug-of-war, it seems as though the argument for paying student-athletes may finally have the leverage it needs to win. On Dec. 17, Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) introduced the College Athletics Bill of Rights. Over the years, various bills and initiatives to increase privileges and rights for student-athletes competing in the NCAA have rolled out, but none as comprehensive and forward-thinking as this. Here is a look at what the NCAA currently has in place, what the College Athletics Bill of Rights would change, and how it will affect student-athletes in the long run. Why student-athletes are not paid currently Under the current NCAA rules, student-athletes must maintain amateur athletic status. This means that college athletes cannot receive payment for playing a sport, funding...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Illinois state lawmakers have approved legislation that could throw a wrench in Chicago Public Schools’ reopening plans, lifting limits on the Chicago Teachers Union’s bargaining rights, which could force the district to negotiate with the union over the phased return to in-person classes. On the same day in-person classes resumed for pre-kindergarten and some special education students at CPS, the Illinois Senate approved legislation to repeal a section of the Illinois Educational Labor Relations Act, which had restricted CTU’s bargaining rights. That part of the law allowed the district to avoid mandatory negotiations with CTU over issues such as layoffs, class sizes, staff assignments, class schedules, the length of the school day and year, outsourcing services, and use of technology to deliver educational programs. That provision of state law left it entirely up to the district whether or not to bargain with the union over those issues. Those bargaining restrictions only apply to unions negotiating with CPS, not any other school district in the state. The Illinois House had approved the proposal to repeal that section of...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Gov. Charlie Baker on Thursday vetoed a bill that would expand abortion access in Massachusetts, citing areas of disagreement with parts of the ROE Act. There’s been a push to codify abortion rights into law since the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg earlier this year. Baker wrote in a letter to legislators that he strongly supports a woman’s right to get reproductive health care. He backs changes to the law that would allow abortions after 24 weeks of pregnancy if the fetus would not survive after birth, eliminate the 24-hour waiting period, and give minors who are unable to get consent for an abortion access to a judicial bypass process. “However, I cannot support the sections of this proposal that expand the availability of later-term abortions and permit minors age 16 and 17 to get an abortion without the consent of a parent or guardian,” Baker wrote. “I, therefore, again urge the Legislature to enact the compromise version of this bill that would affirmative protect a woman’s right to access an abortion, but would restore the...
    By KIMBERLEE KRUESI, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee would no longer prohibit parents from refusing vaccinations of their children under a proposal that's been filed as COVID-19 cases continue to rise ahead of the GOP-dominant Statehouse's upcoming legislative session. Tennessee law currently allows parents to refuse to immunize their children as long as the state is "in the absence of an epidemic or immediate threat of an epidemic.” Other sections of Tennessee statute allow parents to deny immunizations of their kids “except where the medical examination, immunization or treatment is necessary for the protection of the health or safety of others.” These exceptions would be removed according to the legislation, allowing parents to opt out of school-required vaccinations during the coronavirus pandemic. The bill also would give parents the option to cite “right of conscience” as a reason not to immunize their children. Rep. Jay Reedy, a Republican from Erin, and Sen. Mark Pody, a Republican from Lebanon, are the lead sponsors of the legislation. They introduced the bill earlier this week. Lawmakers won't consider taking up the...
    Indiana football coach Tom Allen thinks it’s a good time to expand the College Football Playoff. Allen and the Hoosiers are currently undefeated and control their own fate heading into the playoff. However, the man running Indiana would still like to see things open up and get to eight teams. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football)   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Indiana Football (@indianafootball) Allen told Dan Patrick the following Wednesday when asked about a potential eight-team playoff, according to Sports Illustrated: I think it would make a ton of sense. There’s going to be so many inequities with everybody’s schedule… It’d be a perfect time to expand that number. Doesn’t look like it’s gonna happen, but it sure would make a whole lot of sense. Look, I’m all for expanding the playoff to eight teams, and I’ve supported doing it ever since the playoff started. However, I don’t like this vibe out of Indiana. It almost feels like Allen is hedging in case they lose to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/AP) — There has been no bigger issue in the San Francisco Bay Area and across the state since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic than rent control. Cities and counties across the Bay Area have passed moratoriums on paying rent and on evictions, but on Tuesday voters soundly rejected a state ballot measure that have would let local officials expand those protections. Proposition 21 would have let cities limit rent hikes on properties that are more than 15 years old. People who own one or two single-family homes would have been exempt. “No” votes led early and the lead expanded to 59% after more than 10 million ballots were counted. Tom Bannon of the group Californians for Responsible Housing cheered the decision, saying voters understood the negative impacts the measure would have had on the availability of affordable housing. ’“The broad coalition opposing Prop. 21 – from Governor Gavin Newsom to the California Republican Party, as well as labor, social justice, senior, veterans and housing groups – made an effective case that this initiative would have...
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — San Jose voters are being asked to approve a measure that would increase taxes on cardrooms while expanding the number of gambling tables. Measure H would increase revenues for Bay 101 Casino and Casino Matrix to 16.5 percent, up from 15 percent. “It’s going to be able to add millions of dollars to our city budget,” said Councilmember Raul Peralez, who has the city’s only two card clubs in his district. He supports Measure H, which would potentially boost city coffers by $15 million a year. “Those are the monies that the city can utilize to pay all of our city services. Your police services, your fire services, road maintenance, parking enforcement,” Peralez said. The measure would be the first expansion of card tables in decades. It would also tax revenues from 3rd party proposition players which help the cardrooms operate. But San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo — who has long battled the expansion of gambling– is against Measure H because of potential social impacts. “The child neglect, the domestic violence that results. Social science...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) – Early voting in California began Monday and a pair of propositions on the Nov, 3 ballot would expand voting rights in California – restoring the vote for some felons and allowing 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they turn 18 before the general election. Currently, California felons who have completed their state or federal prison sentences are denied the right to vote until they finish their parole. Proposition 17 would amend the state constitution to give the vote to an estimated 50,000 people who supporters say have paid their debt to society and should be able to choose their representatives and shape the policies that affect their daily lives. Among Prop 17’s opponents is Republican state Sen. Jim Nielsen, who says restoring rights early to felons is a slap in the face to their victims, who should have the assurance that criminals are punished fully. “The victims cannot so blithely put the crimes behind them,” Nielsen said. “The rest of society deserves to know that the just consequences of the sentence has been duly served. And that...
    By CHRISTOPHER WEBER, Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — Early voting in California began Monday and a pair of propositions on the Nov, 3 ballot would expand voting rights in California — restoring the vote for some felons and allowing 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they turn 18 before the general election. Currently, California felons who have completed their state or federal prison sentences are denied the right to vote until they finish their parole. Proposition 17 would amend the state constitution to give the vote to an estimated 50,000 people who supporters say have paid their debt to society and should be able to choose their representatives and shape the policies that affect their daily lives. Among Prop 17's opponents is Republican state Sen. Jim Nielsen, who says restoring rights early to felons is a slap in the face to their victims, who should have the assurance that criminals are punished fully. “The victims cannot so blithely put the crimes behind them,” Nielsen said. “The rest of society deserves to know that the just consequences of the sentence...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Californians will vote on whether to let cities expand rent control as the state grapples with soaring housing costs and a dire need for more home construction. Proposition 21 would allow cities to adopt rent control measures for properties more than 15 years old. People who own one or two single-family homes would be exempt from the measure. The proposal comes after years of rising housing costs have pushed many young adults to move back in with their families to make ends meet. Supporters say the measure is a critical attempt to slow rent increases and prevent homelessness. But critics say it will dampen sorely-needed new construction. “The housing shortage has accumulated, and it’s so extreme that desperate solutions are necessary. And rent control is a desperate solution,” said Dowell Myers, professor of policy, planning and demography at the University of Southern California. Prop 21 is one of a dozen questions on the Nov. 3 ballot. Early voting starts Monday. California voters overwhelmingly rejected a more expansive rent control measure two years ago known as Proposition...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — Californians will vote on whether to let cities expand rent control as the state grapples with soaring housing costs and a dire need for more home construction. Proposition 21 would allow cities to adopt rent control measures for properties more than 15 years old. People who own one or two single-family homes would be exempt from the measure. The proposal comes after years of rising housing costs have pushed many young adults to move back in with their families to make ends meet. Supporters say the measure is a critical attempt to slow rent increases and prevent homelessness, but critics say it will dampen sorely-needed new construction. “The housing shortage has accumulated and it’s so extreme that desperate solutions are necessary. And rent control is a desperate solution,” said Dowell Myers, professor of policy, planning and demography at the University of Southern California. Prop 21 is one of a dozen questions on the Nov. 3 ballot. Early voting starts Monday. California voters overwhelmingly rejected a more expansive rent control measure two years ago known as Proposition 10....
    Ellie and Jack Rosebush lost their Paradise home in the Camp Fire two years ago. The last thing the couple wanted to worry about after deciding to rebuild downtown was a jump in property taxes based on their new construction, Ellie Rosebush said. The Rosebush’s are using a one-time exemption to carry their old property tax rate to their new Butte County home but worry about neighbors being ineligible for the tax break because they’ve moved multiple times. Rosebush, a real estate agent, believes Proposition 19 on the November ballot would grant relief to homeowners struck by natural disaster. “We haven’t had many wins,” said Rosebush, 64. “It feels fair to me.” But property tax relief for homeowners devastated by wildfires is only part of Proposition 19. It’s a complex proposal affecting older homeowners, family ownership transfers, inheritance, fire protection and expanding the benefits of Proposition 13, which placed caps on property taxes. The measure generally would allow homeowners 55 and older to sell a property and keep their lower tax rate on another purchase in all other California counties....
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Curbside dining could soon become a permanent fixture on New York City streets. The City Council is hearing several bills Wednesday that would help struggling restaurants survive through the fall. As CBS2’s Christina Fan reports, two of the major proposals would allow for outdoor dining to continue indefinitely. The other would allow restaurants to put in street heaters. At Kobrick Coffee Company in the Meatpacking District, general manager Mary Colgan isn’t looking forward to the changing of the season. The outdoor dining program she’s relied so heavily on is set to end October 31st. “It’s boggling everybody. You’re trying to find other options, but when you look there are no other options. If they close this,” Colgan said. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Tri-State Coronavirus Travel Advisory Quarantine List Resources, Hotlines, Unemployment & Covering Bills Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home CBS2’s Dr. Max Answers Your Health Questions What To Do If Someone Isn’t Social Distancing Or Wearing A Mask? Expert: Parents Be Mindful Of Children’s Stress After Months Of Isolation Chopper 2 Over Empty NYC Streets, Landmarks...
    By Andrew Chung NEW YORK (Reuters) - The vow by Republican President Donald Trump and the Republicans to quickly fill U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat despite a looming election has revived talk among some Democrats of expanding the number of justices on the court. These Democrats, along with progressive activists, say all options must be considered to counter what would become an entrenched 6-3 conservative majority that could threaten access to healthcare, abortion, and civil rights. A plan to expand the court would likely lead to a bare-knuckles political fight with unpredictable consequences for both parties. Here are a few things to consider about "court packing." SIZE OF THE COURT The number of justices on the high court has remained at nine since 1869, but Congress has the power to change the size of the bench and did so several times before that. LAST PACKING PLAN FAILED In 1937, President Franklin Roosevelt, facing a court that repeatedly struck down his New Deal legislation, proposed adding up to six justices, one for each member of the court over...
    At the very least, Senate Republicans stole one seat from the American people in 2016 when they refused to fill the seat of Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February that year fully nine months before the November election. Within hours, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pledged that his GOP caucus would refuse to replace Scalia until the presidential election took place. “The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president,” McConnell said, as Democratic lawmakers were still offering condolences to Scalia’s family. And after President Barack Obama nominated a relatively moderate judge, Merrick Garland, to fill Scalia's seat, McConnell refused to even give him a hearing, let alone a vote.  So that was the McConnell rule then. But now that liberal justice, women’s right icon, and all-around general badass Ruth Bader Ginsburg has passed, it's something different. After ABC News reported that Donald Trump would nominate a new justice to fill the seat "in the coming days," McConnell issued a statement promising, "President Trump’s nominee will...
    If Democrats can't get "Medicare-for-all," it seems they'll settle for "Medicaid-for-most." Last month, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would supposedly "stabilize" ObamaCare by lavishing billions of dollars on Medicaid. To pay for that effort, the bill's proponents envision cutting Medicare by nearly $450 billion over 10 years. Democrats are also lobbying states to expand the program to able-bodied, low-income adults. Despite a Republican governor and Republican-controlled state legislature, voters in Oklahoma approved Medicaid expansion June 30. Missouri voters will consider a similar measure Aug. 4. DR. QANTA AHMED: WAGING WAR ON CORONAVIRUS – MY STRUGGLE TO SAVE A COVID-19 PATIENT AT DEATH'S DOOR These expansion efforts may seem like a smart way to extend health coverage to vulnerable Americans. But Medicaid is plagued by waste and fraud – and doesn't even provide beneficiaries quality coverage. Medicaid, which will turn 55 on July 31, has ballooned since its creation. The program initially provided health coverage to low-income individuals and families – and eventually grew to cover the blind, disabled and other vulnerable populations. As of 2018, one of every six dollars of health care spending goes through Medicaid – nearly $600 billion.More from Opinion Newt Gingrich: Alarming anti-Semitism surge, other major issues addressed in upcoming...
    Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma voters will decide Tuesday whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. While an increasing number of Oklahoma voters took advantage of mail-in voting for Tuesday's primary, polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. statewide. Idaho, Maine, Nebraska and Utah have all expanded Medicaid through ballot questions, but did so by amending state statutes, according to the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Amending the Oklahoma Constitution will prevent the Republican-controlled Legislature, which has resisted Medicaid expansion for a decade, from tinkering with the program or rolling back coverage. Missouri voters also will decide on a constitutional amendment on Aug. 4. State Question 802 would extend Medicaid health insurance to those earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level, which is about $17,200 for an individual or $35,500 for a family of four. Oklahoma is one of 14 states, along with neighboring Texas and Kansas, that have not expanded Medicaid under the 2010 federal Affordable Care...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma voters will decide Tuesday whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. While an increasing number of Oklahoma voters took advantage of mail-in voting for Tuesday’s primary, polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. statewide. Idaho, Maine, Nebraska and Utah have all expanded Medicaid through ballot questions, but did so by amending state statutes, according to the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Amending the Oklahoma Constitution will prevent the Republican-controlled Legislature, which has resisted Medicaid expansion for a decade, from tinkering with the program or rolling back coverage. Missouri voters also will decide on a constitutional amendment on Aug. 4. State Question 802 would extend Medicaid health insurance to those earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level, which is about $17,200 for an individual or $35,500 for a family of four. Oklahoma is one of 14 states, along with neighboring Texas and Kansas, that have not expanded Medicaid under the 2010 federal Affordable Care Act....
    By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Flicking a dismissive jab at President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a plan Wednesday to expand “Obamacare,” even as Trump’s administration is about to file arguments in a Supreme Court case to strike it down. Pelosi announced an upcoming floor vote on her measure, setting up a debate that will juxtapose the Democrats’ top policy issue, Trump’s unrelenting efforts to dismantle Obama’s legacy, and the untamed coronavirus pandemic. On Thursday, the Trump administration is expected to file papers with the Supreme Court arguing that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional. Pelosi wants her bill on the House floor Monday. Trying to overturn a health insurance expansion providing coverage to about 20 million people “was wrong any time,” Pelosi said. “Now, it is beyond stupid,” she added. “Beyond stupid.” COVID-19 cases are rising in major states like Texas, Florida and California, and millions of workers who have lost coverage in the economic shutdown to contain the virus can rely on the health law as a backup. The White House...
    To address the rising cost of prescription drugs, the bill would empower Medicare to negotiate drug prices and then allow Americans on private insurance to share in the savings. The bill also provides incentives to expand Medicaid for states that have not done so. According to the sponsors of the bill, more than 2 million uninsured Americans could get health insurance through Medicaid if every state embraced the expansion allowed under the ACA. The legislation would also reverse efforts by the Trump administration to expand access to so-called "junk insurance" plans that are not required to protect people with preexisting conditions. The bill was introduced by Reps. Frank Pallone, Jr., chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee; Richard Neal, chair of the Ways and Means Committee; and Bobby Scott, chair of the Education and Labor Committee. "It is telling that in the middle of a public health emergency, House Democrats are proposing to strengthen and enhance the Affordable Care Act, while the Trump Administration is asking the Supreme Court to rip health coverage away from millions of Americans," Scott said...
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Missouri hospitals would have to provide sexual assault exams whenever needed under a bill that Gov. Mike Parson is considering signing into law. Creve Coeur Democratic Sen. Jill Schupp, who spearheaded the proposal, said rape victims now are sometimes turned away or must be driven to hospitals hours away to get a rape exam. DNA samples and other evidence of sexual assault gathered in rape kits can be used by law enforcement and prosecutors to catch and convict rapists. Schupp said after being raped and then turned away from one hospital, some victims might not want to deal with an hours-long drive and decide not to get a rape kit at all. TOP STORIES Not kidding around: Cuomo threatens to reinstate coronavirus shutdowns Supreme Court rules LGBT employees can sue employer for discrimination Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history “We lose forensic evidence in that process,” she said. Few nurses are certified to perform the exams in the state. Only 29 are listed as certified under the International Association of Forensic Nurses...
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