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    The federal government will run out of money in three days while a legislative pileup has continued to plague Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), who failed on Monday to pass a routine defense bill to clear legislative calendar days to pass the $1.9 trillion reconciliation package. Senate Democrats are scrambling to execute the priority of funding the government. Schumer is reportedly trying to get Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on board to pass a measure Wednesday to partially fund the government until late January. But no outcome has resulted from talks. Schumer is likely angling to fund the government only until late January to avoid a larger fight with Republicans while freeing up calendar days to pass the reconciliation package. Complicating the passage of funding the federal government is the Senate Democrats’ failed attempt to pass a routine defense bill, called the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The defense act is usually a bipartisan piece of legislation that has been enacted for 60 years. Senate Republicans successfully delayed the passage of the NDAA Monday to presumably tighten the screws on the Senate Democrats’...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and leader of the “progressive” caucus Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) plan to hurriedly rush President Joe Biden’s reconciliation framework through the House without a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) score before Thanksgiving. The CBO, which marks how much money taxpayers must fork over to pay for the legislation, is not scheduled to have a complete score on Biden’s reconciliation framework before Pelosi and Jayapal whip a vote for the package. The two congresswomen suggested Tuesday they intend to hold a vote on the legislation on or before November 15. But the CBO said Tuesday only parts of the scoring will be completed before the target vote date. “We anticipate releasing estimates for individual titles of the bill as we complete them, some of which will be released this week.,” the CBO explained. “Other estimates will take longer, particularly for provisions in some titles that interact with those in other titles. When we determine a release date for the cost estimate for the entire bill, we will provide advance notice.” President Joe Biden speaks during a press conference...
    Democrats added a provision to the reconciliation bill that would expand humanitarian parole to cover illegal immigrants already living in the U.S., according to the legislation. Congressional Democrats previously tried to pass amnesty through the Build Back Better Act and by amending the registry date in the Immigration and Nationality Act so illegal immigrants can apply for green cards, according to the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS). Expanding parole under the reconciliation package is the Democrats’ third attempt at passing an amnesty provision for millions of illegal immigrants living in the U.S. “Parole is normally a status given to aliens seeking entry into the United States,” CIS Resident Fellow in Law and Policy Andrew Arthur told the DCNF on Friday. “This parole, however, is for aliens who are currently in the United States.” BREAKING: House Rules Committee adopts text of #BuildBackBetter reconciliation bill, including immigration language providing work permits and deportation protection that will provide relief for millions of families. You cannot build back better if you leave us behind. pic.twitter.com/oY3UMVEebS — United Farm Workers (@UFWupdates) November 5, 2021 ...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Thursday wouldn't reveal any information about the timing of a potential vote on Democrats' reconciliation bill and the bipartisan infrastructure bill – and dodged questions about whether Democrats have the votes to pass reconciliation at this point.  "I'll let you know as soon as I wish to," Pelosi, D-Calif., told a reporter who asked when votes on President Biden's two major agenda items may happen. "You're just worried about your own schedule." Further asked whether party leaders will have the support of "Blue Dog" Democrats who earlier this week demanded a Congressional Budget Office (CBO) score and 72 hours to review the bill text – which was released Wednesday afternoon – Pelosi didn't give a clear answer.  Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., meets with reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) SPANBERGER, MANCHIN HIT BIDEN, PROGRESSIVES FOR MASSIVE RECONCILIATION DEMANDS: ‘NOBODY ELECTED HIM TO BE FDR' "We have been all along... we've been sending things to CBO. This is not new to...
    House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said that Democrats will aim to bring votes on the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill and a sweeping social programs package in the House next week. It is an aggressive timeline for final movement on two pieces of legislation that make up the core of President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda and “Build Back Better” platform, particularly with one of the bills not yet written as Democrats continue to fight about its content. "The House will aim to consider the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act and the Build Back Better Act this work period," Hoyer said. The announcement comes after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had breakfast with Biden on Friday morning. Pelosi told reporters she is “very optimistic” that a package that can pass both chambers of Congress will come together soon. AFTER BIDEN MEETING, PELOSI CALLS SPENDING BILL WITHIN SIGHT Democrats have been sparring for months over the timing and content of two major spending bills: a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, which has already passed the Senate with...
    10'000 Hours | DigitalVision | Getty Images As Congress wrangles over many proposals within the Build Back Better reconciliation bill, one section holds the promise of addressing the anxiety millions of American workers, retirees and their families feel about their retirement security. To that point, Congress needs to focus on the retirement provisions included in the budget reconciliation bill that would be impactful for both employers and their employees. One provision in the bill, passed by two House committees, would require businesses with five or more employees to offer a workplace retirement plan. Employers who already provide workplace retirement plans would not need to change their current offerings. As important, another provision would require employers to offer employees with $200,000 or more in a retirement account a choice to invest up to 50% of their vested balance in a protected lifetime income product. Providing this option would allow the employee to create a monthly income stream that they cannot outlive, mimicking the traditional pensions that many employers used to offer. More from Personal Finance:Pandemic has disrupted retirement plans for 35%...
    Progressive Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaSunday shows preview: Biden amps up involvement in talks amid tug-of-war over infrastructure Why is Biden doubling down on Trump's nuclear expansion? Sanders, Manchin, Sinema fight proxy war in the House MORE (D-Calif.) said on Sunday that he is confident that President BidenJoe BidenTop GOP senator: 'Far-left Democrats are driving the bus and Joe Biden is just along for the ride' Political study should give Democrats a jolt Fauci says it's a 'false narrative' to think COVID-19 vaccine not needed if Merck drug approved MORE will be able to negotiate a compromise that will allow for both the bipartisan infrastructure package and the larger reconciliation bill to pass. Appearing on "Fox News Sunday," Khanna was asked by host Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceTop GOP senator: 'Far-left Democrats are driving the bus and Joe Biden is just along for the ride' Senior White House adviser says Biden 'expects to get' both infrastructure and reconciliation bills Fox opens renovated bureau honoring Krauthammer, Snow MORE how Congress will lower the price of the reconciliation bill, as Democrats are considering....
    BlueGreen Alliance, a far-left coalition of labor and environmental groups, is placing a six-figure ad buy in five states to pressure members of Congress to pass President Joe Biden’s radical agenda. The Hill reported the groups are spending $450,000 on the ads that will start Monday, running on social media platforms such as YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook, as well as online and print news outlets, in the five targeted states. The ads are meant to urge members of Congress, like Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D) and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin (D), to pass the partisan $3.5 trillion reconciliation package Democrats are using to push part of President Joe Biden’s radical agenda. Both Sinema and Manchin have so far opposed passing a reconciliation package worth trillions of dollars, The ads will reportedly also run in Montana, Colorado, and Virginia. The coalition consists of labor and environmental groups such as United Steelworkers, Service Employees International Union, American Federation of Teachers, League of Conservation Voters, and Sierra Club. In the ad running in West Virginia, Steve Williams, the Democrat mayor of Huntington, said, “If Washington can’t get this done, it’s our families who are going to be paying the price.” Watch:...
    Moderate Democrat Joe Manchin spelled out his opposition to President Biden's massive spending plans on Thursday, warning his colleagues against fostering an 'entitlement mentality' and saying he could only support a $1.5 trillion package - $2 trillion less than the White House wants. The West Virginia senator is one of the key votes standing in the way of Biden's entire domestic policy agenda. The impasse between moderate Democrats and progressives also threatens to derail a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. Manchin told reporters on Capitol Hill that he could only back a spending bill that cost $1.5 trillion and demanded that key welfare provisions be means tested. 'I cannot accept our economy or basically our society moving towards an entitlement mentality ... that you're entitled,' he said. Instead, he added that he was in favor of helping people who also made an effort to help themselves.      He has been circulating his $1.5 trillion plan since July, setting out his red lines. They include means testing on new programs, including health care, child care and education. Sen. Joe Manchin told reporters...
    Democrat Majority Whip Rep. James Clyburn told reporters Wednesday if the Democrat controlled government does not pass President Biden’s radical agenda, “people will not forgive us.” With the House scheduled to vote on the $1.2 trillion “bipartisan” bill Thursday, Clyburn stressed the importance of whipping the radical left into voting for the bill. “If we fail to pass these two bills, people will not forgive us,” he said, referencing the $3.5 trillion reconciliation package. But Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) and her 94-member “Congressional Progressive Caucus” have repeatedly encouraged House members to block the bill, which would result in the far-left maintaining their leverage over Biden’s agenda. “I will not be able to support that, and neither will the majority of our members,” Jayapal told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Tuesday evening. Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) speaks to reporters outside of the U.S. Capitol on September 23, 2021 in Washington, DC. Lawmakers continue to work towards coming to an agreement to pass legislation to fund the government by the new fiscal year deadline on September 30th. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) Socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT),...
    Democratic insiders have one message for the liberals and centrists in their party who are haggling over President Joe Biden’s economic agenda on Capitol Hill: Figure it out — or else. Democratic pollsters and liberal activists say failure to clear a $3.5 trillion reconciliation package chock full of Biden’s spending priorities, in total or in part, and failure to approve a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill the president negotiated would sink the party’s congressional majorities in 2022. Votes on both bills could happen this week, although Democratic liberals and centrists in the House and Senate were still at odds over the various legislation early Monday. “Both of the bills are vital to Democratic success, particularly in the House, in 2022,” said Navin Nayak, president and CEO of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, the political arm of the Center for American Progress, a liberal Washington think tank. “The stakes are really high.” Nayak and a trio of senior Democratic pollsters spoke with reporters Friday to emphasize how critical it is politically for Democrats in the House and Senate to...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden is facing a huge week. In the early days of his presidency, his ambitions to expand the social safety net had some people hailing him as a potential successor to Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson. Julian ZelizerBut his agenda could come apart at the seams next week as Democrats face a looming government shutdown, the threat of a federal debt default and the potential implosion of either the infrastructure bill or the $3.5 trillion spending package. If this happens, Biden's presidency will suffer a huge setback and the American Rescue Plan, his biggest accomplishment to date, could become a fading memory for many voters by the time 2022 rolls around. The harsh reality of governing in modern times is sinking in. The threat of a filibuster allowed Republicans to pressure Democrats to compromise on the infrastructure bill, which passed in the Senate with bipartisan support after painstaking negotiations. Now, as the bill heads to the House, Republican leaders in the lower chamber are rallying members of the party to oppose the bill. Congressional Republicans...
    The Senate is waiting with baited breath as the Senate parliamentarian considers whether Democrats are allowed to include immigration reform in their $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill, a move that would allow Democrats to circumvent the filibuster and the opposing party on the decades-old issue.  Democrats made their case this week to Senate Parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough that their immigration proposal should survive the "Byrd Bath" – a process of weeding out non-budget related items from budget reconciliation bills named after the late Sen. Robert Byrd of West Virginia.  "Literally we are in the Byrd Bath," Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., said Tuesday. "A presentation is being made on behalf of the provisions we authored for changing immigration in the United States. That matter is now being considered by the Senate parliamentarian… It is entirely in her hands at this point." "We believe immigration is a critical element in reconciliation for three reasons," Durbin said, laying out Democrats' case for its inclusion in the bill. "First reason: How many years have we all complained that the immigration system in America is broken and...
    (CNN)Senate Democrats made their case Friday to include a path to legalization for millions of immigrants in their $3.5 trillion bill to expand the country's social safety net. In a key meeting with the Senate's parliamentarian, Elizabeth McDonough, Democrats argued for their plan to give roughly 8 million immigrants an opportunity to apply for green cards in the country and how it would have a major economic impact, a pitch they hope will convince her to allow them to include it in a complicated process known as reconciliation. Under that process, Democrats can pass legislation with just a simple majority. But, they have to prove the law they are trying to pass along party lines has more than just an "incidental" impact on the country's bottom line. The legislation has to undergo what is known as the Byrd bath, a process named for former West Virginia Sen. Robert Byrd who helped craft the limits of when a political party can use the special budgetary process. In the meeting Friday, sources told CNN that Democratic aides argued that allowing recipients of...
    (CNN)A group of economists urged congressional leadership to add a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants to a budget reconciliation bill, arguing that it would bolster the US economy, according to a letter obtained by CNN. The more than 50 economists, including former President Barack Obama's top economic adviser Jason Furman, cited research and studies underscoring their analysis that immigration revisions would increase wages and productivity across the US economy, including creating jobs and lifting families out of poverty. The letter adds to the growing chorus of immigrant advocates and Democratic lawmakers who want to prove that including immigration revisions in any budget reconciliation legislation would have budgetary effects and as a result should be included in the final version of the bill. Whats in the Democrats $3.5 trillion spending planIt's a massive gamble for a party that has been promising to deliver on immigration restructuring for more than a decade, but key advocates argue that it is the last hope -- potentially in this Congress -- for anything to pass."A pathway to citizenship is a key component of...
    Democrats all the way up to President Biden are warning the worst is yet to come after Hurricane Ida flooded the northeast and killed at least 21, as they push for costly climate change measures.  'This is yet another reminder that extreme storms and the climate crisis are here,' Biden said in an address on Hurricane Ida's devastation.  'Floods are going to happen with increasing frequency,' he continued. 'For us, this isn't about politics. Hurricane Ida didn't care if you were a Democrat or Republican. This destruction is everywhere.' Biden said that when the Senate returns to Washington he would direct them to pass the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation plan as part of his 'Build Back Better' agenda. 'Experiencing all this flooding in NYC right now and thinking about all the politicians who told me that pursuing a Green New Deal to adapt our nat'l infrastructure to climate change is 'unrealistic' & 'too expensive.'' Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, N.Y., wrote on Twitter. 'As if doing too little is the responsible, adult thing to do?' 'Members of both parties engage in misleading...
    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union” that there were “more than enough” votes to prevent the bipartisan infrastructure bill from passing the House without the much larger bill that Democrats want to pass with the reconciliation process. Anchor Jake Tapper said, “You just heard Joe Manchin a few moments ago talk about the reconciliation bill, $3.5 trillion. He said he can’t give him any guarantee it would pass the Senate. what’s your response to that?” Ocasio-Cortez said, “These deals on infrastructure that have gone out are not just bipartisan, but they were bicameral…It was made very clear at the beginning of this process that this bipartisan deal if it even survives the Senate, the only chance that it has at passing the House is if the House passes the Senate bill and if the Senate passes the House bill, which is largely in reconciliation. So we can’t just have one body driving the entire legislative agenda for the country and, frankly, 20 senators within that one body. So we need a reconciliation bill if we want this bipartisan bill...
    New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezSunday shows preview: Delta concerns prompt CDC mask update; bipartisan infrastructure bill to face challenges in Senate House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Democrats warn shrinking Biden's spending plan could backfire MORE (D) said on Sunday that there would be “more than enough” votes to prevent a bipartisan infrastructure bill from passing the House without a massive companion spending bill that Democrats hope to pass through reconciliation.  During an appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Ocasio-Cortez told host Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperSimone Biles sparks nationwide conversation on mental health Aly Raisman defends former teammate Biles: 'I'm proud of her' House Republican calls second bout of COVID-19 'far more challenging' MORE that if the Senate doesn’t pass the reconciliation bill, the House “will uphold our end of the bargain and not pass the bipartisan bill until we get all of these investments in." “So, we really need to see that language and see what's put in there ... when it reaches the House,” Ocasio-Cortez told Tapper. “Bipartisan doesn't always mean that it's...
    More On: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Squad members turn Capitol Hill into homeless encampment Defund the police advocate AOC has spent thousands in 2021 on personal security AOC, Cori Bush slam all-white infrastructure negotiators for lack of diversity Eric Adams says ‘running against philosophies’ not aimed at AOC Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez insisted on Sunday that House Democrats will not approve the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal unless the Senate also passes the Dems’ proposed overall $3.5 trillion spending plan.  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) tied the fate of the two pieces of legislation together last month when she said the House will not take up the infrastructure bill unless the proposed spending measure is passed by “reconciliation” — a procedural tactic that would allow the Democrats to pass the measure in the 50-50 Senate by a simple majority and bypass Republicans. Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) said House Democrats must back that proposal.  “We have to hold on to that bargain. If there is not a reconciliation bill in the House, and if the Senate does not pass the reconciliation bill, we will uphold our...
                      by Eric Lendrum  In a meeting at the White House with Democratic lawmakers, Joe Biden reaffirmed his support for the radical notion of including mass amnesty for illegal aliens in the proposed reconciliation bill, according to CNN. Biden met with 11 lawmakers – five senators and six members of the House – on Thursday to discuss a possible amnesty deal following the latest blow to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA was an executive order signed by then-President Barack Obama in 2012 to provide blanket amnesty to illegal aliens who came into the country as minors. Judge Andrew Hanen, of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, ruled earlier this month that as the law had been implemented via executive order only after its legislative counterpart, the DREAM Act, failed to pass through Congress, the law was unconstitutional. The order blocks any future illegals from applying for the amnesty, but does not affect current or past applicants. Although Biden has vowed to resist the ruling via...
    Washington (CNN)Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona announced Wednesday that she does not support a $3.5 trillion dollar budget bill Democrats plan to pass along party lines, saying she doesn't agree with its price tag, on the same day lawmakers hashed out an agreement on a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package.While Sinema signaled she wants to pare back the package's $3.5 trillion cost, she didn't say by how much -- a sign that she's willing to negotiate. The senator also indicated she will likely vote to move forward with the budget resolution, which has to first pass Congress before lawmakers can consider the reconciliation plan."I have also made clear that while I will support beginning this process, I do not support a bill that costs $3.5 trillion -- and in the coming months, I will work in good faith to develop this legislation with my colleagues and the administration to strengthen Arizona's economy and help Arizona's everyday families get ahead," Sinema, a moderate and key Democratic negotiator working on the infrastructure deal, said in a statement. Sinema's comments were first...
    Immigrants and allies march across the Manhattan Bridge to call on Congress to act on a pathway to citizenship for undocumented communities. Undocumented immigrants in New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and the nation’s capital rallied in the streets and even shut down a major bridge on Friday to send a clear message to Congress: Protect young immigrants, temporary status holders, and essential workers now by passing a pathway to citizenship in the upcoming budget reconciliation package.  “Congress has the chance to fulfill the broken promises of more than three decades by including a pathway to citizenship in President Biden’s infrastructure package,“ FIRM Action and New York Immigration Coalition Executive Director Murad Awawdeh said in a statement received by Daily Kos. “Today’s actions are a reminder that our immigrant communities have always been essential and cannot wait any longer to breathe free.” Groups said that in New York City, 1,000 people marched across the Manhattan Bridge after rallying in Columbus Park. In a powerful video shared by Make the Road New York, a large crowd is seen walking down the bridge while holding a sign reading,...
    Democrats have announced their intent to pass a federal clean energy standard — a landmark climate initiative that would increase the use of fossil-fuel-free energy across the country and could save consumers money in the long run — through budget reconciliation.  About 60% of the nation's electricity is generated by fossil fuels. President Joe Biden has promised to create an 80% clean energy grid by 2030 and 100% clean by 2035. A federal standard would be a crucial catalyst to reaching those goals.  It would require utility companies to gradually convert their energy sources from ones that rely on carbon-generating fuels like coal and natural gas to greener ones like wind or solar power, which don't emit carbon dioxide. The federal government would offer money to utilities that comply, and fine those that don't meet clean energy goals. More than one-third of the country lives in a region that has already committed to using 100% clean energy in the future, with at least 30 states already setting some kind of renewable or clean energy standard.  Renewable energy refers to power...
    Senator Lindsey Graham (R- SC) suggested that Senate Republicans take a page from Texas Democrats and leave D.C. to stop a vote on the reconciliation bill from the Biden administration and congressional Democrats. He told Maria Bartiromo that the reconciliation package “is not infrastructure, it’s big government, a liberal wish list.” Graham then went on to reference the Texas Democrats who fled the state to stop Republicans from voting on new election law: Before Republicans beat up on the Democrats in Texas for leaving Texas too much, if for some reason they pass reconciliation, budget resolution to bring that bill to the floor of the United States Senate, the $3.5 trillion bill, you’ve got have a quorum to pass a bill in the the Senate, I would leave before I’d let that happen. So to my Republican colleagues, we may learn something from our Democratic friends in Texas when it comes to avoiding a $3.5 trillion tax and spend package. Leave town. When Bartiromo asked if he would really consider this move, Graham said, “Hell yeah, I would leave!” “I...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks to the media after the Senate Democratic policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 22, 2021.Joshua Roberts | Reuters The Senate may work into its August recess to pass both a bipartisan infrastructure plan and a budget resolution that would allow Democrats to enact a range of priorities without Republican support, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday. In a letter to his caucus, the New York Democrat said senators are working with the White House to turn the $1.2 trillion infrastructure framework into legislation. The Senate Budget Committee is also crafting a measure that would allow Democrats to pass a sprawling child care, health care and climate policy plan without a GOP vote. "My intention for this work period is for the Senate to consider both the bipartisan infrastructure legislation and a budget resolution with reconciliation instructions, which is the first step for passing legislation through the reconciliation process," Schumer wrote ahead of the chamber's return to Washington next week. "Please be advised that time is of the essence and we...
    Sen. Bernie Sanders. Sen. Bernie Sanders announced this week that Senate Democrats would be seeking to include a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants in their infrastructure proposal, the Los Angeles Times reports. It’s not yet clear which immigrants would be eligible, nor is there a guarantee of a path to citizenship will make it into the final reconciliation package. But advocates who have been pushing Democrats to go it alone on immigration following Republican inaction declared, “game on.” “Here we go,” said America’s Voice Executive Director Frank Sharry. “For months, the immigrant justice movement has sought a path to victory on citizenship legislation that relies on the strong support of Democratic champions and not the bad faith of Republican pretenders. That path is now opening up as Democrats move to develop a human infrastructure bill that includes jobs, care, climate and citizenship and can pass the Senate with 51 votes.” The LA Times reported that “[a]n early draft would call for $150 billion to go toward immigration policies, including the path to citizenship and some border security, according to a document circulating on Capitol Hill.”...
    (CNN)Senate Democratic leaders, facing skepticism from liberals about the direction of bipartisan infrastructure talks, plan to formally begin a process that would allow them to pass President Joe Biden's signature policy agenda along straight party lines. The move is meant to placate progressives who are concerned their priorities won't be included in a bipartisan plan and is a way for Democratic leaders to show they are pushing forward with a strategy to pass sweeping legislation on the strength of their narrow Senate majority and without Republican support. But it risks turning off moderate Democrats who are more focused on reaching across the aisle and threatens to scuttle a carefully crafted compromise with Republicans. In an effort to strike a delicate balance, Democratic leaders argue that they are taking a dual-track approach by keeping the door open to deliver a bipartisan deal while also laying the groundwork to pass a separate, broader infrastructure package with only Democratic votes. The smaller package is designed to focus on more traditional projects like roads, bridges and broader -- while the larger package will include...
    Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerIn Congress, what goes on behind closed doors? Senate Judiciary begins investigation into DOJ lawmaker subpoenas America needs a stable Israeli government MORE (D-N.Y.) says he will convene a meeting with all 11 Democratic members of the Budget Committee Wednesday to begin the process for passing a budget resolution, paving the way for Democrats to pass a major infrastructure bill on a party-line vote. Schumer said he hopes to pass the budget resolution for fiscal year 2022 in July. “Tomorrow I’m convening a meeting with all 11 Democratic members of the Senate Budget Committee regarding a fiscal year ‘22 budget resolution,” Schumer said. “Now that President BidenJoe BidenFormer Rep. Rohrabacher says he took part in Jan. 6 march to Capitol but did not storm building Saudis picked up drugs in Cairo used to kill Khashoggi: report Biden looking to build momentum for Putin meeting MORE’s fiscal ‘22 budget request has been received by Congress, the Budget Committee can begin the important work of producing a budget resolution,” he added. Schumer tacitly noted that a budget...
    Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., is urging Democrats to abandon hope of a bipartisan deal on infrastructure and instead push through an agreementl without GOP support.  Jayapal, chairwoman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, said in a statement: "In case it wasn’t clear already, it certainly is now: Republicans are not going to do what needs to be done for working families." "We know Mitch ‘100% of my focus is on stopping this new administration’ won’t be coming around on a deal," the Washington Democrat wrote in an earlier tweet. "Time to go big, bold, and alone." She urged Congress to "immediately begin working on budget resolutions to pass the American Jobs and Families Plan through reconciliation so we can deliver on our promises." Sen. Kristen Gillibrand, D-N.Y., also urged the Senate to take up the bill through reconciliation. "So that bill I hope we passed a reconciliation, so that it can be bold and responsive to meet the needs," she said Wednesday.  MANCHIN PUSHES BACK AGAINST DEM-ONLY INFRASTRUCTURE BILL  The statement came shortly after President Biden walked away from a deal...
    Senate Parliamentarian Elizabeth McDonough recently laid out in more detail how Democrats may revisit their already-passed budget reconciliation package to pass more of President Biden's spending priorities, but that path contains more hurdles and roadblocks than some previously anticipated.  Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said earlier this year that the parliamentarian said Democrats could revisit the 2021 budget reconciliation vehicle that was used to pass the $1.9 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill, though the details were very murky then.  Democrats have been negotiating a potential infrastructure bill with Republicans, aiming to get at least 10 of them on board to clear the 60-vote filibuster threshold. But they've kept the idea of revisiting the previous 2021 budget reconciliation measure in their back pocket in case a deal cannot be reached and they want to get around the filibuster to pass a Democrats-only bill.  This would leave a reconciliation measure for the upcoming fiscal year on the table for other priorities like tax reform or the president's American Families Plan – essentially giving Democrats an extra opportunity to pass major fiscal legislation without...
    President Joe Biden and Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer were dealt a blow in a ruling by the Senate parliamentarian that will give them essentially one opportunity to pass Biden's ambitious spending plans on a simple majority vote this year. The Democrats had been seeking approval for a strategy that would give them multiple opportunities to move Biden's infrastructure and other spending plans through the chamber under special 'reconciliation' rules that would prevent a Republican filibuster. Senate rule-keeper Elizabeth MacDonough ruled essentially that Democrats would get only a single bite at the apple – although Biden wants action on his $1.7 trillion infrastructure plan (slimmed down from $2.3 trillion), and his $1.8 trillion American Families Plan.  It all comes at a time when Biden is calling for June to be a 'month of action' – but his allies fret Republican filibusters will soon grind parts of his agenda to a halt.   'June should be a month of action on Capitol Hill,' President Joe Biden said this week. But this month could also be when his ambitious proposals slam into...
    The Biden administration has once again alluded to the idea of using budget procedures to get around Republican opposition to the president's infrastructure plan – with Pete Buttigieg referencing another path if negotiators advance by Memorial Day. The Transportation secretary who has been involved in the negotiations spoke Monday, after a group of Republicans roundly rejected the latest offer by the administration – a trimmed down plan that still comes in at $1.7 trillion. That offer, revealed Friday, is still far more than what a group of centrists Republicans have proposed of around $600 billion.  President Biden came out with a $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal, which the White House trimmed to $1.7 trillion in a counteroffer to Republicans 'We continue to think there needs to be major progress by Memorial Day,' Buttigieg told CNN on Monday.  'All that is not going to happen by Memorial Day. But we really need to get this done this summer, which is why we continue to want to see, even just in the few days between now and the holiday, some real progress if...
    For a second time, Senate Democrats could implement President Joe Biden’s agenda with the budget reconciliation process by amending the 2021 budget, but the move is without precedent. Senate Parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough ruled on April 5 that Democrats could pass President Joe Biden’s infrastructure package by using budget reconciliation, even though they already used the process to pass the American Rescue Plan. The terms of the budget reconciliation process are set out by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974. This is from Schumer’s office on the idea of using reconciliation twice for the same budget resolution. We’ll figure out what this means and be back to you shortly. pic.twitter.com/AjTkItFm2l — Jake Sherman (@JakeSherman) April 5, 2021 The budget reconciliation process is triggered by the passing of a budget resolution by the House and the Senate. That resolution will assign specific dollar amounts to be raised or lowered by various committees, according to Brookings Institute. Once the resolution passes, Congress can pass legislation that directly addresses the specific dollar amounts. Under Senate interpretations of the Congressional Budget Act,...
    Speaker Nancy Pelosi expressed hope that Congress would pass President Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure proposal ahead of the August recess. During her weekly press conference on Thursday, Pelosi said that House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chair Peter DeFazio believes his committee could take up the bill in May. "I would hope that our part in that House would be largely done before the Fourth of July. Whether the whole package can be done then, we just don't know. But as some had suggested, we want to do it before the August break," Pelosi said. But Republicans have balked at the size of Mr. Biden's plan, and questioned the inclusion of provisions related to social issues such as bolstering home care for the elderly and disabled. They have also criticized the president's proposal to pay for the package by raising the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28%, and negotiating a new global minimum tax on multinational corporations. While she said that she wanted the package to pass on a bipartisan basis, Pelosi acknowledged that Congress may have to use...
    Asked if President Biden agrees with Sen. Joe Manchin that reconciliation should not be the "normal order" in the Senate, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the president would leave it up to Congress to decide.  Budget reconciliation is a process of passing certain budget-related measures with a simple majority rather than having to get 60 votes to break a filibuster. It was used to pass the latest $1.9T coronavirus relief bill, the American Jobs Plan, and will likely be used to pass the White House’s $2.2 trillion spending bill that includes infrastructure improvements.  Manchin, D-W.Va., wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post arguing against using budget reconciliation in most cases. "I simply do not believe budget reconciliation should replace regular order in the Senate," the article read. Psaki read out other lines from the article that Biden agrees with. "Republicans, however, have a responsibility to stop saying no, and participate in finding real compromise with Democrats," was one line she read. But Manchin had also written, "Democrats must avoid the temptation to abandon our Republican colleagues on important national issues."...
    (CNN)Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin made his opposition to frequent use of the budget reconciliation process clear Wednesday evening in a Washington Post op-ed, sending a warning to Democrats who hope to use it to pass President Joe Biden's legislative priorities."If the filibuster is eliminated or budget reconciliation becomes the norm, a new and dangerous precedent will be set to pass sweeping, partisan legislation that changes the direction of our nation every time there is a change in political control. The consequences will be profound -- our nation may never see stable governing again," the West Virginia lawmaker wrote.His message comes after the Senate parliamentarian ruled earlier this week that Democrats may amend the budget resolution they used for their Covid-19 relief bill and attach another set of reconciliation instructions to it, according to two sources familiar with the matter.The ruling was a key step for Democrats as they weigh their options for moving infrastructure legislation, potentially giving them a route to pass new legislation without Republican votes. But the reconciliation process still requires a simple majority, a threshold Democrats can't...
    Democratic West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin promised not to “eliminate or weaken” the filibuster in the face of calls from some members of his party to eliminate the procedure. “The filibuster is a critical tool to protecting [minority] input and our democratic form of government,” Manchin wrote in an April 7 op-ed in the Washington Post. Senate Democrats have discussed either eliminating the filibuster or using budget reconciliation to pass President Joe Biden’s infrastructure package. Manchin splashes ice water on filibuster reform AND multi-reconciliation … “I simply do not believe budget reconciliation should replace regular order in the Senate.” https://t.co/b2cjRlGeSs — Burgess Everett (@burgessev) April 7, 2021 Manchin called on legislators to “usher [in] a new era of bipartisanship where we find common ground on the major policy debates facing our nation.” However, when senators can not find common ground, the majority should not use budget reconciliation or the filibuster to avoid minority input, he writes. “If the filibuster is eliminated or budget reconciliation becomes the norm, a new and dangerous precedent will be set to pass sweeping, partisan...
    MSNBC anchor Lawrence O’Donnell said on his Monday show “The Last Word” that Democrats were abusing the reconciliation process to pass President Joe Biden’s infrastructure package. The Senate parliamentarian ruled Monday Democrats can use the reconciliation process for infrastructure, meaning it can pass with a simple-majority vote. O’Donnell said, “There’s a quote from a Republican staffer in the Senate reacting to this today, saying, this is an abuse of the process and clearly not what reconciliation was designed to do, but they’re going to go forward anyway. I have to tell you I agree, that completely. It is an abuse of the reconciliation process, as it was designed. But this comes after years of abuse in the Senate by Mitch McConnell forcing the Democrats into this position because there’s no other way to govern in the Senate now.” Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH) said, “Yeah, here we go. They don’t have to abide by the rules. When the Republicans are in charge, deficits don’t matter when Republicans are in charge. Then the Democrats come in, and they want everybody to do it...
    Washington — As Congress pursues President Biden's ambitious legislative agenda, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is mulling the use of an obscure procedural maneuver that would allow for the president's massive infrastructure bill to pass without any Republican votes. Mr. Biden introduced the first part of his two-pronged infrastructure package on Wednesday. Although Democrats control both chambers of Congress and the White House, their hold on the Senate in particular is tenuous with a 50-seat majority. Most legislation requires 60 votes to advance in the Senate, and Democrats are unlikely to get Republican support for their more ambitious and expensive proposals. Absent of eliminating the filibuster, which would allow legislation to advance with a simple majority, Democrats have few options for passing their priorities without any Republican votes. One such path is budget reconciliation, a procedural maneuver which allows for budget-related items to pass with a simple majority. Congress used budget reconciliation to pass Mr. Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan earlier this month without any Republican votes. Democrats used a budget resolution for the current fiscal year to...
    White House chief of staff Ron KlainRon KlainThe Hill's Morning Report - GOP pounces on Biden's infrastructure plan Biden to hold first Cabinet meeting on Thursday Trump says Capitol rioters posed 'zero threat' MORE opened the door Thursday to using the budget reconciliation process to pass President BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - GOP pounces on Biden's infrastructure plan Biden administration unveils network of community leaders to urge COVID-19 vaccinations Pompeo 'regrets' not making more progress with North Korea MORE’s infrastructure plan without GOP votes but said he’s still hoping to win over some Republicans. In an interview with Politico, Klain hedged on a question about the reconciliation gambit, which would allow Democrats to pass the over $2 trillion package without going through the Senate’s 60-vote filibuster, though he said the White House has not given up on working in a bipartisan fashion.  “What we want to do is get this passed and I think that starts with a conversation with a broad array of members in both parties to see where the support is, how this looks as we...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is eyeing an in-the-weeds rule that could give him extra opportunities to bypass the Senate’s filibuster roadblock and pass sweeping legislation with a simple majority. If the Senate parliamentarian agrees, Schumer could use the budget reconciliation process to pass at least one more bill with 51 votes instead of the usual 60-vote threshold required to avoid a filibuster. The change would be significant. Though Democrats have trifecta control of the House, Senate, and White House, they are largely unable to pass many of their priorities through a 50-50 divided Senate because avoiding a filibuster requires the support of at least 10 Republicans. Earlier this year, Democrats circumvented a filibuster and used the budget reconciliation process to pass the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan without the support of any Republicans. MANCHIN UNDER PRESSURE TO CAVE ON FILIBUSTER However, It was widely thought that the process could be used only once per fiscal year. The American Resue Plan accounted for fiscal year 2021, leaving Schumer just one more opportunity to use...
    It’s all about how creatively you can bend the rules. Take the late Cincinnati Bengals head coach Sam Wyche in the late 1980s. As innovative a head coach as there ever was. Wyche unveiled the vaunted "no huddle offense." The Bengals would make a play, then race to the new line of scrimmage for the next down. The defense had no idea what was coming. They couldn’t sprint off the field in time for the next snap. The defense couldn’t sub personnel. It was a brilliant tactic by the Bengals and got them to the Super Bowl. Legendary New York Yankees manager Billy Martin knew baseball’s "pine tar" rule – even if no one else did. Rule 3.02 states that a bat handle "for not more than 18 inches from its end, may be covered or treated with any material or substance to improve the grip. Any such material or substance extends past the 18-inch limitation shall cause the bat to be removed from the game." SCHUMER PLOTS NEW WAY TO BYPASS REPUBLICANS ON BIDEN'S THIRD ECONOMIC SPENDING BILL Martin...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is exploring how to pass President Biden's third economic spending bill later this year without any Republican votes via an obscure Senate rule that would allow Democrats to use reconciliation again.   Top policy aides to Schumer recently argued to the Senate parliamentarian, a nonpartisan referee, that Section 304 of the Congressional Budget Act allows Democrats to pass at least a third bill this year using a simple majority, an aide for the New York Democrat told Fox News. "Schumer wants to maximize his options to allow Senate Democrats multiple pathways to advance President Biden's Build Back Better agenda if Senate Republicans try to obstruct or water down a bipartisan agreement," the aide said.   MANCHIN PLEDGES TO BLOCK BIDEN INFRASTRUCTURE BILL IF REPUBLICANS AREN'T INCLUDED Democrats already used budget reconciliation to pass the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan earlier this month, and are considering using the method again to bypass GOP votes on Biden's forthcoming infrastructure bill. The complicated Senate process allows Democrats to circumvent the 60-vote filibuster and advance the measure using their 50 seats, with Vice President Kamala Harris breaking any tie. Without...
    Bradley Cortright March 16, 2021 0 Comments Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) appeared to suggest he is willing to eliminate, or make changes to, the filibuster if Republicans try to block legislation. Speaking to reporters on Tuesday, Schumer said, “We Democrats, all of us, believe we need big, bold change. As I’ve said before, we hope our Republican colleagues will work with us to produce that change.” “We will try to get them to work with us. But if not, we will put our heads together and figure out how to go, and everything is on the table,” he added. Watch the video below: SCHUMER ON FILIBUSTER: "We Democrats, all of us, believe we need big bold change–we hope our Republican colleagues will work with us–We will try to get them to work with us. But if not we will put our heads together and figure out how to go and everything is on the table." pic.twitter.com/J5BTQjK43L— Breaking911 (@Breaking911) March 16, 2021 According to the Senate’s website, the filibuster is a “a loosely defined term for action designed to...
    A Senate Democrat on Monday accidentally outed plans to pass an infrastructure bill without Republican votes — indicating President Biden’s talk of national “unity” is unlikely to apply to his major legislation. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) told Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg at an event that Democrats intend to use the same budget reconciliation process that allowed for party-line passage of Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 stimulus bill, a statement he thought was private but was caught on a hot-mic. “Ultimately, it’s going to be put together similar,” Cardin could be heard telling Buttigieg into a hot mic at a UPS facility in Maryland, unknowingly spilling the beans to a much larger audience. Democrats “most likely have to use reconciliation,” the Senate Small Business Committee chairman said, adding that Republicans only “meet with you to a point.” Reconciliation rules are rarely used to pass major bills. But the process allows for Democrats to pass legislation with a bare majority in the evenly divided Senate, rather than with the usual 60-vote supermajority required for bills. Vice President Kamala Harris breaks Senate ties...
    Democratic Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin admitted Monday that Democrats will pass a future infrastructure bill through the budget reconciliation process. “Ultimately, it’s going to be put together similar to how the rescue plan was put together. It’s gotta be, at the end of the day. You’re most likely going to have to use reconciliation… The Republicans will [only] be with you to a point,” Cardin said on a C-SPAN hot mic. Sen. Ben Cardin, as heard on a C-SPAN mic, tells Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg that Democrats will “most likely have to use reconciliation” on an infrastructure package as they did with the Covid relief bill. “The Republicans will be with you to a point, and then—“ pic.twitter.com/d4Pc49WlIl — Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur) March 15, 2021 Cardin appeared with Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and Democratic Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen at a United Parcel Service facility in Maryland that is serving as a COVID-19 distribution hub. Grateful after meeting some of the UPS workers distributing vaccines across the national capital region. Better days are ahead because of their work. pic.twitter.com/ScW8YLh2Xa...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer expressed confidence on Tuesday that President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill will pass in the Senate this week, saying the Senate will take up the legislation as early as Wednesday. The Senate is using the budget reconciliation process to pass the bill, which limits time for debate and allows legislation to pass with a simple majority. "We want to get the biggest, strongest, boldest bill that can pass. And that's what we are working to do," Schumer told reporters. "We'll have the votes we need to pass the bill." Schumer spoke to reporters after Mr. Biden addressed Democratic senators virtually during their caucus lunch. "Biden made his pitch today to our entire caucus. He said we need to pass this bill and pass it soon," Schumer said. The Senate is evenly divided, and Vice President Kamala Harris casts the tie-breaking vote, meaning that all 50 Democratic senators will need to support the bill for it to pass. Republicans have criticized the size of the bill and chastised Democrats for using the budget reconciliation...
    (CNN)Senate Democrats decided Sunday to abandon an alternative proposal to penalize companies for not providing a $15 minimum wage to their employees, the latest indication that boosting the federal minimum wage in this Congress remains an extremely tall order, according to a person involved in the talks.Democrats had a difficult time crafting the tax provisions in the proposal, sources said, so they are looking at other potential avenues to boost the rate. Yet it underscores the dire chances of boosting the wage after the Senate parliamentarian ruled that their initial plan doesn't fall within the rules of budget reconciliation, a process that allows Democrats to pass the $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief plan with just 51 votes.If they can't find an alternative rate hike to fit into the budget reconciliation bill, then Democrats will have to try to pass such a plan through regular order, meaning 60 votes would be needed in the 50-50 Senate. The relief bill hits the Senate floor later this week. The Washington Post was first to report news of Senate Democrats abandoning the corporate tax penalty...
    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speak after a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Tasos Katopodis | Getty Images President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus package advanced out of the House Budget Committee on Monday and is now set for a full House vote later this week. Monday's markup proceeding was one of the final steps in the House's reconciliation process, which will allow Democrats to muscle the bill through the chamber without GOP support. The bill's fate now moves to the House Rules Committee, essentially a formality. Then it will move to the House floor, where Democrats led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are expected to pass it along party lines Friday or Saturday. No major changes to the bill came of the committee's markup. Notwithstanding House GOP objections, the bill is widely expected to advance to the Senate after the House vote later this week. Then it is expected to face a new round of hurdles. Republicans in both the House and the Senate have criticized the...
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