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    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — The City of San Francisco will pay Black and Pacific Islander women $1,000 a month during their pregnancies and after birth in a pilot program to study how the monthly support helps achieve better maternal health and birthing outcomes. The Abundant Birth Project will provide the monthly supplement to approximately 150 women in San Francisco for the duration of their pregnancy and the first six months of the baby’s life, with the goal of eventually providing the supplement for up to two years post-pregnancy, according to a press statement from Mayor London Breed. The program is being launched in conjunction with Expecting Justice, a Black-led birth justice initiative lead by Dr. Zea Malawa at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and supported by the Hellman Foundation and the UCSF California Preterm Birth Initiative. Expecting Justice will study the resulting health impacts of the program,...
    Jason Wu Thank you, Jason Wu, because even if most of us were not watching in Tulum (where Wu married his husband in 2016), it certainly felt as if we could be. The very first show of New York Fashion Week took place on the roof Spring Studios, fronds blowing in the wind, the few guests sitting at appropriate social distancing. The clothes, like the show, felt more relaxed than usual. The models walked along a winding, sandy-looking path, decked in the kinds of clothes it might be fun to have in your shipwreck suitcase: colors bold and muted, soft, stripes and bold, block color. Long, flowing dresses, attractive prints, easy-breezy, nothing tight. A few blazers. No high heels. Instead, the models walked in lovely, tatty-looking sandals with tassels on them. At the end of the show, the camera tracked up and dwelt on New York’s rooftops,...
    The New Orleans Saints is dedicating its season to highlighting “oppression” of black women in its latest social justice initiative. The Saints rolled out the campaign on Friday ahead of the first weekend of the NFL football season with a video of Saints players sitting down and committing their “platform” to “raise awareness about the current state of black women in America.” The video mentions the case of Breonna Taylor, a black 26-year-old woman killed by police in March. The video shows eight saints players – left tackle Terron Armstead, quarterback Drew Brees, linebacker Demario Davis, safety Malcolm Jenkins, defensive end Cameron Jordan, running back Alvin Kamara, punter Thomas Morstead, and linebacker Craig Robertson – alternating and reading through parts of a script explaining the initiative. Transcript: We care about the issues that plague our community, and in light of all of the things that we see going on in...
    While traveling alone in Mexico, Amanda Black was robbed. She felt violated and scared, and she didn’t know where to turn in a foreign county with no friends or family. That’s when she realized the need for an online support network—a place where women traveling alone can get advice and, in some cases, urgent help. She founded the Solo Female Traveler Network in 2016, and thousands of women joined immediately, sharing similar stories of vulnerability. Today, the Facebook group and website count more than 420,000 members, and it’s become a place of empowerment for women traveling the globe. This week on 2 GIRLS 1 PODCAST, Alli and Jen talk to Black about the unique challenges women face when traveling, the discouraging responses from friends and family when women decide to travel, and some amazing stories of how this online community saved the day in an IRL crisis. Listen to episode...
    Virginia Lieutenant Gov. Justin Fairfax speaks to demonstrators in front of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is pictured on June 4, 2020 in Richmond, Virginia.(Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images) Loading the player... FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) — Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax formally kicked off his campaign for governor Saturday, a year after facing two allegations of sexual assault. Fairfax delivered a campaign speech at the Old Court House in Fairfax in northern Virginia. Three Black Democrats, including Fairfax, are currently vying for the party’s 2021 nomination to the governor’s house. The other names in the mix are Jennifer Carroll Foy, a Black woman serving her second term in the state House, and Jennifer McClellan, a seasoned Black politician serving her first full term in the state Senate. Virginia Lieutenant Gov. Justin Fairfax speaks to demonstrators in front of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee...
    PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) — This year's Black New England Conference is going online and is discussing Black women's leadership and activism. The theme of the conference is “Black Women Rock: Leading the Charge for Social and Political Change." It is scheduled for Sept. 25-26. Speakers and discussion leaders include Sheryl Lee Ralph, an actress and activist who created the DIVA Foundation devoted to AIDS advocacy; Susan Taylor, founder and CEO of National CARES Mentoring movement and editor-in-chief emerita of Essence Magazine; Andrea Jenkins, an American policy aide, politician, writer, performance artist, poet, and transgender activist; state Sen. Patricia Ann Spearman of Nevada, the first openly lesbian member of the Nevada Legislature; CaShawn Thompson, creator of Black Girl Magic; and Democratic U.S. Rep. Ayanna Pressley, the first Black woman elected to Congress from Massachusetts. The Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire and Southern New Hampshire University are hosting the conference. The...
    Loading the player... On September 10, Biden for President Wisconsin hosted “Sister to Sister,” a voter registration organizing event focused on informing Black women about registering to vote, absentee ballots, and the importance of voting. The event panelists included Donna Brazile, Rep. Gwen Moore, Alderwoman Chantia Lewis, Tiffany Henry and supervisor Sequanna Taylor, and was facilitated by Milwaukee County Board Chairwoman Marcelia Nicholson.  Read More: Anita Hill pledges to vote for Joe Biden and work with him on gender issues “Black women are most likely to mobilize and to vote this nation forward. So we thought it was important to create a space to address these issues and talk about the plans that Democrats have to solve them,” Nicholson said.  Sister to Sister is that space, according to its organizers, where Black women to build unity and address issues, interests and needs unique to them. The panel offered...
    Teen Vogue is the latest magazine to spotlight activists with its September issue, featuring a pair of black trans women on dual covers.  On Wednesday, the publication unveiled its two covers with starring activist-models Jari Jones and Munroe Bergdorf. 'During a year of rebellion + revolution, this September we wanted to center the women at the heart of fashion but often left out of the conversation: @munroebergdorf + @iamjarijones — two black trans women who are trailblazers, redefining the industry,' they wrote on Twitter. A big deal: Jari Jones (pictured) is one of two black trans models to cover the September issue of Teen Vogue Number two: The other cover star is Munroe Bergdorf  (pictured) On display: Teen Vogue said they wanted to spotlight 'two black trans women that are trailblazers in redefining beauty, fashion, and culture 'Black trans women's lives matter — not just when we...
    Halle Berry has branded her historic Oscar win as 'one of my biggest heartbreaks' as she remains the only black actress to score the top accolade. The actress, 54, scooped the Best Actress award in 2002 for her role as Leticia Musgrove in indie drama Monster's Ball. Halle has now discussed her 'heartbreak' over the fact she is still the only black woman to have won the top trophy in a new candid interview with Variety. Speaking out: Halle Berry has branded her historic Oscar win as 'one of my biggest heartbreaks' as she remains the only black actress to score the top accolade (pictured in 2019)  The star admitted she thought she was chosen to 'open a door' and now questions whether it was even an 'important moment'. Halle explained how she had hoped Cynthia Erivo, 33, would have won for Harriet earlier this year, while she also felt Ruth Negga, 38, had a 'really good shot...
    A blogger who has written a book about the experiences of plus-size black women, said she was inspired to tell their stories because the body positivity movement has 'shifted focus' towards white bodies which have 'more privilege'.  Stephanie Yeboah, from London, has been part of the body positive community since 2014 and has embraced calling herself 'fat', penning a book called 'Fattily Ever After', which will tell the stories of plus-sized black women.  Appearing on Lorraine today, she explained that while the movement has seen a huge boost in popularity over the last five years, it now has its 'own standard of beauty' and has 'given more visibility' to 'smaller and white' bodies.  Stephanie Yeboah, pictured, from London, has been part of the body positive community since 2014 and has embraced calling herself 'fat' Appearing on Lorraine today, she claimed the positivity movement has 'shifted focus' towards bodies which have...
    Pop star Lana Del Rey, in an extensive interview for Interview magazine, said there is “no way in hell” the Black Lives Matter movement is going away, likening it to the #MeToo movement, which she said was “not just a passing movement.” The “Cinnamon Girl” singer discussed a variety of topics during a Q&A with Jack Antonoff, the producer of her upcoming album Chemtrails Over the Country Club. Del Rey, who has come under fire from critics for supposedly “glamorizing abuse” in her lyrics, spoke about the impact the Chinese coronavirus has had on individuals, sparking them to explore their emotional and mental health. “It’s a real test of our emotional resilience. If we can get this right culturally, we can open up a few decades of the greatest music and the greatest dance and the greatest theater and the greatest human interaction,” Antonoff said — an assessment the NME Award...
    Loading the player... Joe Biden has made historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) one of the hallmarks of his constituencies in an effort to win the 2020 presidential election. The Students for Biden initiative has rallied since August 2019 to make sure the former Vice President becomes the 46th President. Part of that effort is On The Yard, a brand new webinar series led by the HBCU and Black Students for Biden that addresses the importance of voting for Biden/Harris. The guest of Tuesday’s inaugural episode was Love and Hip-Hop star, entertainment manager and entrepreneur Yandy Smith-Harris. READ MORE: Joe Biden kicks off new HBCU voter initiative Although she’s gained most of her notoriety from the long running VH1 reality show, Smith-Harris was appropriately equipped to address the audience. She is an HBCU alum herself, having graduated from Howard University. Aside from choosing California Sen. Kamala...
    The enduring Golden Women are coming again to TV — with a twist. It’s going to have an all-black forged with an all-star lineup that features Tracee Ellis Ross, Regina King, Alfre Woodard and Sanaa Lathan. They’ll assemble for a Zoom manufacturing on Sept. eight at 9 p.m., as a part of a sequence referred to as “The Zoom The place it Occurs.” The unique sitcom, which adopted the friendship between 4 older ladies residing collectively in Miami, aired on NBC from 1985 to 1992 and starred Betty White, Bea Arthur, Rue McClanahan and Estelle Getty. In line with Ross’ Instagram publish concerning the present, she is going to play Rose Nylund (performed by White within the unique), King will painting Dorothy Zbornak (Arthur within the unique), Lathan will play Blanche Devereaux (McClanahan within the unique) and Woodard will grow to be Sophia Petrillo (Getty within the unique).From left,...
    In 2018, record-breaking numbers of women ran for office and won, leading to the most diverse Congress in history. Of the 127 women serving in the 116th US Congress, 48, or 37.8%, are women of color, according to the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University. While 2018 became another “Year of the Woman,” the 2020 Congressional elections are shaping up to be just as groundbreaking for women of color. This year, at least 266 women of color are major-party candidates for Congress with 249 candidates for the U.S. House and 18 for the U.S. Senate. Women who identify as Asian or Pacific Islander, Black, Latina, Middle Eastern or North African, Native American, and/or multiracial are all breaking records this year, according to CAWP’s analysis released on Aug. 5. This is an overview of what they found: At...
    Erin L. Thompson September 8, 2020 11:30AM (UTC) This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. On August 26, 2020, Alice in Wonderland will get some company. She will be joined in New York City's Central Park by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth, the first statues there of women who, unlike Alice, actually existed. The monument is a gift to the park from Monumental Women, a non-profit organization formed in 2014. The group has raised the $1.5 million necessary to commission, install, and maintain the new "Women's Rights Pioneers Monument" and so achieve its goal of "breaking the bronze ceiling" in Central Park. Preparations for its unveiling on the centennial anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted suffrage (that is, the right to vote) to women, are in full swing. Celebratory articles have been written. The ceremony will be live-streamed. Viola Davis, Meryl Streep, Zoe Saldana, Rita Moreno, and America...
    (CNN)Last month, Americans celebrated the centennial of the 19th Amendment, recognizing women's right to vote. This celebration rings hollow -- as we hurtle toward the 2020 election -- if we fail to learn from the ways that race has been used to fracture women's efforts toward coalition politics and our collective understanding of our rights. For example, even as Senator Kamala Harris's historic role as the first woman of color to run for vice president on a major party ticket energizes feminist coalitions, Donald Trump's divisive manipulation of racial stereotypes seeks to fracture and obscure women's shared interests. Catherine Powell Camille Gear RichNotably, 2020 is also the 150-year anniversary of the 15th Amendment, recognizing the right of Black men to vote (though for many Black men, reality would look very different until well into the 20th century). And yet, significantly less media attention has focused on that anniversary, much...
    Two women hope to create an all-black community in central Georgia as a way to deal with “400 years of racial oppression.” Microsoft News used a “good news” tag for the report, which said that as the United States “continues to confront the toxic legacy of slavery and Jim Crow,” the women want to create “a tight-knit community for our people to just come and breathe”: They are calling it Freedom, Georgia, and draw their inspiration from Wakanda, the fictional comic-book country that was the setting for the movie “Black Panther.” Ashley Scott, a realtor from Stonecrest, Georgia, who was driven to seek therapy by her reaction to the shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man jogging in a white neighborhood, said that after several sessions she realized that her problem was 400 years of racial oppression and trauma dating back to the establishment of slavery in North America....
    (CNN)Dear fellow White women,President Donald Trump is betting that you will be more scared of Black people than you will be of dying of Covid-19, losing your job or your children's schools not reopening.Andrea Portes If you're a mom or a caregiver, you already know that the amount of thankless, unsung work we did was barely manageable before the pandemic. But now, thanks in part to Trump's failure to listen to the scientists and to actually deal with the reality of the Covid virus, so many of our children are not back to school, as they are in Europe. So now, we have an extra job that is more maddening, more stressful than anything we had before -- educating our children remotely. Now our children's futures depend on how well we do as teaching assistants, which, in my case, is not very well. The other day, while doing a mindfulness...
    Savannah Rychcik September 7, 2020 0 Comments President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen is accusing him of making disparaging remarks about women and other various groups in his new book. The Wall Street Journal reviewed a copy of Cohen’s book, “Disloyal: A Memoir,” ahead of the release date on Tuesday. According to Cohen, Trump would “corner pretty women in his office and forcibly kiss them as they recoiled.” Cohen wrote Trump described contestants in the Miss Universe contest as “the finest pieces of ass from every state and country.” He recalled an experience he had with the president at his Bedminster, N.J., golf club in 2012, where Trump pointed to Cohen’s daughter and allegedly said, “Look at that piece of ass… I would love some of that.” Cohen recounted Trump’s criticism of former President Barack Obama. He explained after Obama’s inauguration, Trump made a video...
    This story is part of Prism’s series on incarceration as gendered violence. Read the rest of the series here.  By Ashley C. Sawyer, Esq.  When I was fresh out of undergrad, I worked as a victim advocate with people who survived violent harm in Essex County, New Jersey. The memories of the survivors and victims replay regularly in my mind. I cannot forget the story of a Black woman, Monica Paul, who was murdered at a local YMCA by her ex-boyfriend while she was watching their son’s swim lessons. To this day, I feel a visceral anger at the Black man who could snatch the life of another human being in front of their own children. At the time, I didn’t have a critique for the system that failed to protect Monica. I think many of us believe the lie that the murder couldn’t have been prevented, and the only thing our...
    MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Three black women who were the target of a racist rant at Dockweiler State Beach are now getting support on their Sunday run.In response to the incident last weekend, runners came together for Sunday morning's "Run Against Racism."Friends, family and community supporters say they plan to continue running with them at the beach every Sunday in solidarity.Video captures woman launch racist rant toward 3 Black women at Dockweiler BeachEMBED More News Videos Three Black women were subject to a racist rant from another woman at a Los Angeles beach in an encounter captured on video.
    This story is part of Prism’s series on incarceration as gendered violence. Read the rest of the series here. The single most overwhelming response I’ve ever received to reporting was last year when I published a three-part series about the U.S. Marshals Services’ (USMS) role in the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy at the border, which funneled pregnant migrants into the federal law enforcement agency's custody, triggering a series of reproductive injustices that included shackling, the denial of prenatal care, and the separation of mothers from their newborns. I received dozens of messages, fielded media requests like never before, and members of Congress even called for an investigation. Amid all the outrage, I can’t recall anyone making the connection that these same atrocities play out every day in prisons nationwide. When I began my investigation into reproductive injustices at the border, I interviewed migrants who’d given birth...
    The University of Maryland announced Friday it’s renaming the women’s studies department after Harriet Tubman – the 19-century abolitionist and famous female “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. “It is my honor to announce a major milestone in our university's history: the first honorific naming of an academic department at UMD, the Harriet Tubman Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies,” University of Maryland President Darryll J. Pines said in a letter Friday. “It is fitting that this heroic Marylander is now honored at the state's flagship university. The department is widely acclaimed for its unique concentration in Black feminist thought and intersectionality, and it is the only department in the nation that offers a Black women's studies minor, jointly with the Department of African American Studies,” Pines said. “Historically, Black women have played a brave and critical role in social justice. Harriet Tubman's life and her dedication to freedom...
    Takirra Winfield Dixon September 5, 2020 11:30PM (UTC) In July, rapper Megan Thee Stallion was involved in a horrific incident in Los Angeles. She was shot in both feet. Police reports of what happened were unsurprisingly vague, not even confirming that she suffered gunshot wounds. In the wake of the shooting, she was dismissed and ignored, joked about and made into a meme on social media. In order to counteract rampant speculation and misinformation, she opened up about the incident on Instagram, claiming hip hop artist Tory Lanez was the shooter. She has even felt the need to share photos of her injuries to prove her story, something no one should have to do. No matter your feelings or opinions on Megan or her music, she is a victim of violence. As if Megan hadn't been through enough, though, here comes Chrissy Teigen — a celebrity and a woman of color with a platform and a huge...
    HAVE you ever been ashamed of your natural hair - or lack of it? You're not the only one. But these three women all have very different reasons for rewriting the beauty rules. 10Three women reveal why they refuse to hide their natural hairCredit: Lancton ‘I stopped dyeing my red hair to be a role model for my kids’ VICKY Bancroft, 29, a learning support assistant, lives in Watford, Hertfordshire, with her husband James, 34, and children Millie-Rose, 10, Sophia, seven, and Henry, five. “Holding my daughter Sophia in my arms just after she was born, I gazed at her beautiful red hair. It was exactly the same shade mine had been as a child. However, I’d spent the past decade colouring it, racking up countless hours and hundreds of pounds in salons hiding the fact I was anatural redhead. 10Vicky Bancroft was bullied at school because of...
    Actress Salma Hayek wowed her 15.8 million Instagram followers after posting a throwback photo where she looked completely mesmerized by singing superstar Beyoncé. The Frida star uploaded the picture in honor of the crooner’s birthday. Though the upload was posted as a video, it consisted the same picture that flashed across the screen over and over again. In the shot, Hayek wore a white lace blouse with a high-collared neckline and trendy ruffled sleeves at the wris. She coupled the top with a pair of black jeans. They were a mid-rise silhouette, flattering the actress’s enviable figure. Hayek’s hair was styled in a loose voluminous waves, and her glossy brunette locks cascaded down past her shoulders. But while Hayek’s outfit was as chic as ever, what was arguably the most eye-catching element of the look was the actress’s awestruck pose. Hayek had turned sideways to face Beyoncé, leaning back and...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Shrivathsa Sridhar Former U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens believes the current cohort of young Black women at the top of the game bodes well for the future of African-American involvement in tennis. Stephens beat Olga Govortsova on Thursday to reach the third round at Flushing Meadows, where she will play compatriot and 23-times Grand Slam champion Serena Williams. The days when Williams and her sister Venus were the exception as women of color playing at Grand Slams are long gone and Stephens thinks that will only inspire more Black girls to give the sport a go. “I think it’s awesome,” Stephens told reporters. “Right now … leading our sport on the women’s side is African-American women, which is amazing.” “From Naomi (Osaka) to Coco (Gauff), Venus (Williams), Serena (Williams), Maddie...
    (CNN)The University of Maryland has honored Harriet Tubman by renaming an academic department after her."It is my honor to announce a major milestone in our university's history: the first honorific naming of an academic department at UMD, the Harriet Tubman Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies," UMD president Darryll J. Pines said in a letter on Friday. The American abolitionist and activist was born into slavery, but escaped. She later organized and carried out missions to free other enslaved Black people in the United States. Breonna Taylor, John Lewis and Rosa Parks are among the people Americans have nominated for Trumps garden of American heroes"Historically, Black women have played a brave and critical role in social justice. Harriet Tubman's life and her dedication to freedom and equality speaks directly to the department's mission, now and in the years ahead," Pines said.The university department is renown for its "unique concentration...
    This story is part of Prism’s series on incarceration as gendered violence. Read the rest of the series here.  By Briana Perry  Jails and prisons were designed as sites of reproductive coercion. Women’s divergence from what is narrowly considered appropriate gender performance under patriarchy, particularly around sex and reproduction, has been the foundational basis for their “criminality.” Early on, incarcerated women had to participate in reeducation to cure their deviant behavior. As Angela Davis explains in Are Prisons Obsolete?, for middle-class white women, the goal was to produce more obedient and nurturing wives and mothers. For Black and poor women, it was to produce skilled domestic servants and enable the cheap reproduction of the labor force. In line with this logic, since the first women’s prison opened in the U.S. in 1873, incarcerated women—and particularly Black women—have experienced a multitude of sexual and reproductive abuses. This has included non-consensual sterilization,...
    The sharp drop in U.S. unemployment in August was led by huge declines in unemployment among black men and Hispanic women. Overall unemployment in the U.S. fell 1.8 percent points, from 10.2 percent to 8.4 percent, according to data released Friday. That was much better than the decline to 9.8 percent forecast by economists. The biggest decline in unemployment was among Hispanic women, who saw their unemployment rate fall from 14 percent a month to 10.5 percent, a three and a half percentage point decline. Black men also experienced a sizable decline. Their unemployment rate fell two percentage points, from 15.2 to 12.2 percent. White women experienced a 2.3 percentage point drop in unemployment, from 9.6 percent to 7.3 percent. These topped the gains for white men. White men saw their unemployment rate fall 1.4 percentage points, from 8.3 to 6.9 percent, less than the overall gain for the country....
    Sen. Ted Cruz, a man who’s been convinced of his own brilliance at least since he was a teenager, decided Wednesday to show just how willfully ignorant he is. Tweeting about the medical abortion drug Mifeprex, Cruz wrote, “Pregnancy is not a life-threatening illness, and the abortion pill does not cure or prevent any disease. Make no mistake, Mifeprex is a dangerous pill. That’s why 20 of my Republican colleagues and I are urging @US_FDA to classify it as such.” Reaction on Twitter was swift and brutal and centered around a few key points: Pregnancy, while not an illness, is absolutely a life-threatening condition. Many women die in pregnancy or childbirth—and Cruz’s own state of Texas has the highest maternal mortality rate in the developed world, at 35.8 per 100,000 live births. High rates of maternal mortality in the U.S. hit Black women especially hard—the numbers are 17.4 per 100,000 live births overall and 37.1...
    Three black women enjoying a morning run along a Los Angeles beach were subject to a vile racist ran from a stranger who they said came out of nowhere. The three friends, identified only by their first names as Brittany, Jessyka and Raquel, said they had been on their weekly jog along the Dockweiler State Beach Sunday when a woman - since dubbed a Karen online - began spewing racial slurs at them. Among the slew of derogatory terms, the three friends say the woman called them the n-word on more than once occasion. The women also claim she said ‘Black lives don’t matter, your life doesn’t matter, you need to go back to Africa’. In footage of the encounter, which has since gone viral, the woman is heard saying to Brittany in the clip: ‘You guys are so violent. You Africans are so f***ing violent.’ Scroll down for video ...
    Singer Demi Lovato opened up about the shame she feels for her white privilege and how she changed her social advocacy following the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd, both of which sparked a wave of Black Lives Matter protests across the country. Writing in Vogue, the singer lamented for several paragraphs about her ongoing struggles with mental illness and anxiety, which the COVID-19 pandemic further exacerbated. Looking back on 2020, she feels it has been a year of great change that has helped her realize how much more she should be doing to help other people. “I’ve always taken my advocacy work seriously, but now I’m looking at it with renewed focus. In this particular instance, what motivated me was knowing how much of myself comes from Black culture,” she wrote. “I grew up listening to Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston and other soulful singers, but those two Black...
    Pop star Demi Lovato says she’s ashamed that she’s benefited from “privilege” while working in the entertainment industry, writing in an open letter that she hated sharing “the same skin color as the people accused of committing heinous crimes” against black people in recent months. “At first, I was self-conscious about speaking out about these issues because I didn’t want anyone to feel like it wasn’t genuine,” said Lovato in an open letter published in Vogue on Tuesday. “I also felt like I wanted to call every person of color that I knew and apologize, which I know isn’t the right thing to do either. Like a lot of people. I didn’t know what to do.” “All I knew was that I hated that I shared the same skin color as the people accused of committing heinous crimes against Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and many, many other Black lives,” said Lovato....
    A coalition of black leaders wrote to the CEO of Planned Parenthood to urge her “to confront the systemic racism of America’s abortion practices” and to “renounce the racist legacy” of her organization’s founder, Margaret Sanger. According to Rev. Dean Nelson, executive director of Human Coalition Action, which organized the letter, at least 120 black leaders joined together Monday in calling upon Planned Parenthood to end its “ongoing systemic targeting of Black people.” For yrs, Planned Parenthood has targeted minorities w/ abortion. It’s the fulfillment of Margaret Sanger’s racist & eugenics agenda. Today, 120 Black leaders joined me in urging them to acknowledge & stop their ongoing systemic targeting of Black people. https://t.co/1cayHRo5Jm pic.twitter.com/l7Pmjshgum — Rev. Dean Nelson (@RevDeanNelson) September 1, 2020 The leaders wrote to Alexis McGill Johnson: We are a diverse coalition of Black leaders fighting for the dignity of all human life. Like you, we feel called...
    One of the most pressing challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic has been the widespread closures of schools and child care centers. The loss of these mainstays of daily life has been profoundly destabilizing across the country, affecting kids’ development and threatening to derail working mothers’ careers, even as workers in early childhood education and caregiving face job losses or health risks in addition to the low wages and lack of benefits they were already dealing with. As women of color make up a significant portion of the early childhood education and caregiving workforce, and are also more likely to struggle with finding child care regardless of the industry they work in, the child care crisis brought on by the pandemic has only exacerbated existing inequalities. In case you missed it, catch up on Prism’s coverage of child care challenges, centering on the groups most impacted. Black child...
    Monroeville, Alabama, the inspiration for To Kill a Mockingbird, has elected its first Black mayor Walmarts new membership program to launch Sept. 15 with same-day delivery, fuel discount This Beauty Supply Store Was Created for—and Is Run By—Black Women © Glamour A universal truth: if you're a Black woman in America, the beauty supply store isn't just a place to buy shampoo or a cheap bottle of nail polish, but a first step in the cherished tradition of self care. You know it well: aisles that seem to go on forever and shelves stocked to the ceiling with everything from bonnets to blow dryer attachments; a place to grab jojoba oil, wig caps, and hair jewelry.  Stores like this have been a staple of Black culture in America for decades—without them, products we’ve come to rely on would be nearly impossible to find elsewhere—so it’s an unfortunate bit of...
    The centennial anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment just passed in August. The crowning achievement of the women's suffrage movement, the amendment reads, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex."  In reality, though, not all women were granted the right to vote in 1920. That milestone wasn't wouldn't come until the 1965 Voting Rights Act. And even now, Congresswoman Deb Haaland, Democrat of New Mexico, considers the anniversary to be representative of obstacles that remain. Get updates from the campaign trail delivered to your inbox "We are still in a battle for access to voting, especially for communities of color, and working people," she said in an interview.  In the same way that many Americans, especially White Americans, have come to recognize that holidays like the...
    Former acting Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell issued a two-sentence rebuttal to former first lady Michelle Obama’s claim that “white America” acts as if black women don’t exist. “@realDonaldTrump saw Alice Johnson. @BarackObama didn’t see Alice Johnson,” Grenell tweeted Monday in response to a New York Post story headlined, “Michelle Obama says ‘white America’ acts like black women don’t exist.” . @realDonaldTrump saw Alice Johnson. @BarackObama didn’t see Alice Johnson. https://t.co/71odJI5j85— Richard Grenell (@RichardGrenell) September 1, 2020 Alice Johnson, who is black, was granted clemency in 2018 by President Trump after Kim Kardashian West lobbied for her release from prison over her involvement in a cocaine-trafficking organization in the 1990s. Johnson spoke at the Republican National Convention last week, lauding the president for his criminal justice reform initiatives. "I was once told that the only way I would ever be reunited with my family would be as...
    James Harden Didnt Want the Only Ball and Russell Westbrook Didnt Know What to Do With It 20 of the Coolest Bookstores in America BIPOC women have been hard hit by the pandemic — and they were already on shaky footing © Samantha Lee/Business Insider Samantha Lee/Business Insider © Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images A cashier works at the Cardenas Markets grocery store as a for hire sign is seen on High Street in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images Sign up here to receive our newsletter Gender at Work in your inbox twice a month. Load Error The novel coronavirus pandemic and ensuing recession have affected workers across the country. BIPOC women (BIPOC stands for Black, indigenous, and people of color) have been hit especially hard.  The obstacles blocking BIPOC women from professional and...
    Elderly, ill and Black in a pandemic: Im doing everything I can not to get this virus Walmart to launch its membership program, Walmart+, in mid-September Love Island Continues Failing Black Women and Making a Guilty Pleasure Hard to Watch Reality dating shows have always satisfied the part of me that likes seeing the ridiculous heights production will reach trying to make "unscripted" reality look authentic. There's also a small part of me that doesn't want to miss the chance to see actual love blossom between people in unusual circumstances. But as a Black woman watching dating shows like Love Island or The Bachelor, the experience is more like a roller coaster of dread, anticipating the moment where the Black women cast will suffer microaggressions, get painted as villains with heinous edits, or worse, be forced to endure the strain of being thought of as undesirable. © CBS...
    MSNBC anchor Joy Reid said suburban moms fear President Donald Trump supporters with guns, not Black Lives Matter kids” with “skateboards and a bull horn,” on Monday’s broadcast of “The Reidout.” Washington Post opinion writer Jennifer Rubin said, “This was the guy who brought two people to his convention who are indicted for waving weapons at Black Lives Matter people. This is the party now of white vigilanteism of white supremacy because the Republican Party has rolled over, didn’t bother to come up with a platform or agenda of their own. Every Republican has bought into this notion of Trump, bought into the incitement of racial conflict, bought into this really, George Wallacish race-baiting. I think they are going to pay a heavy price. I do not think this is what people in the suburbs are looking for.” Reid said, “I will tell you, it’s very hard to find a...
    Former acting Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell offered a counter argument Monday to former first lady Michelle Obama's assertion that black women like her are "invisible" to white Americans — and he invoked her husband to make his point. What are the details? The New York Post reported last week that Mrs. Obama claimed on her podcast that black women are "invisible" to white people in the U.S., recounting a story where a white woman cut in front of her and her daughters when they were in line for ice cream without their Secret Service detail. In response to the Post's story on Twitter, Grenell noted, ". @realDonaldTrump saw Alice Johnson. @BarackObama didn't see Alice Johnson." . @realDonaldTrump saw Alice Johnson. @BarackObama didn’t see Alice Johnson. https://t.co/71odJI5j85 — Richard Grenell (@Richard Grenell)1598919002.0 Alice Johnson — who is black — served over 21 years of a...
    MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Three Black women were subject to a racist rant from another woman at a Los Angeles beach in an encounter captured on video.The three women -- Brittany, Jessyka and Raquel -- said they were on their Sunday morning run at Dockweiler State Beach when the woman in the video directed racial slurs at them.The woman seen in the video said she was calling the police, claiming the women had accosted her."I'm calling the police. This woman just hit me," the woman in the video is heard saying."You guys are so violent. You Africans are so (expletive) violent," the woman later said. "You're an African, right? I'm trying to get a description."RELATED: Supporters rally for Canoga Park street vendor who was harassed with racist remarksEMBED More News Videos Supporters of a Canoga Park street vendor who was harassed with anti-immigrant and racist remarks rallied at the...
    MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Three Black women were subject to a racist rant from another woman at a Los Angeles beach in an encounter captured on video.The three women -- Brittany, Jessyka and Raquel -- said they were on their Sunday morning run at Dockweiler State Beach when the woman in the video directed racial slurs at them.The woman seen in the video said she was calling the police, claiming the women had accosted her."I'm calling the police. This woman just hit me," the woman in the video is heard saying."You guys are so violent. You Africans are so (expletive) violent," the woman later said. "You're an African, right? I'm trying to get a description."RELATED: Supporters rally for Canoga Park street vendor who was harassed with racist remarksEMBED More News Videos Supporters of a Canoga Park street vendor who was harassed with anti-immigrant and racist remarks rallied at the...
    MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Three Black women were subject to a racist rant from another woman at a Los Angeles beach in an encounter captured on video.The three women -- Brittany, Jessyka and Raquel -- said they were on their Sunday morning run at Dockweiler State Beach when the woman in the video directed racial slurs at them.The woman seen in the video said she was calling the police, claiming the women had accosted her."I'm calling the police. This woman just hit me," the woman in the video is heard saying."You guys are so violent. You Africans are so (expletive) violent," the woman later said. "You're an African, right? I'm trying to get a description."The group originally encountered the woman at the beginning of their run, then captured the video on their way back."I have to expose this, so I actually caught up to her and was like, 'Tell...
    ARVADA, Colo. (CBS4) – When the “Amplify” series was launched on The Arvada Center’s YouTube page earlier this summer, its creator, Betty Hart, had no idea it would be such a hit. “The public embraced it in a way that was really beyond all expectations and immediately began to say, ‘what’s next?” she told CBS4’s Michael Abeyta. (credit: Arvada Center) It started out as three episodes of Black men sharing their frustrations and feelings about what it’s like to be Black in America through art. Now Hart says it’s time to hear from Black women. “The women are building the house on the foundation that the men have laid. And so because the men have laid that foundation of fear and anger, women are able to do that, but they are also able to show joy,” Hart said. Lynne Hastings made a short movie for the upcoming series. She says...
    Marjorie de Sousa She may be surrounded by controversy due to her legal fight with Julián Gil, but that does not deny that the Venezuelan is one of the most beautiful women in show business. The actress’s beauty has never been questioned, and she is considered one of the most dazzling women in soap operas, who also knows how to be an empowered protagonist, like a damsel in distress. However, it is also true that many prefer her as bad, since the nuances of the malevolent drama combined with her beauty make her stand out above her own fellow protagonists. A few hours ago, alluding to her stunning beauty, she stole all eyes on Instagram, posing from a pool in a black dress, without a bra and transparent underneath.
    Tennessee State Rep. John DeBerry, a longtime Democrat who has represented Memphis for 26 years, unloaded on violent rioters who are burning cities down across the U.S. and also took a shot at people who are “too frightened to stand up and protect our own stuff.” DeBerry told Fox News that he’s “appalled” when people try to compare Black Lives Matter to the civil rights movement, saying “there is absolutely no comparison.” DeBerry, during an impassioned speech at the Tennessee House of Representatives, gave the following remarks earlier this month: I rise because I continue to hear references to what I saw in growing up in this country and growing up in the state of Tennessee as I walked with my father and worked with my father here in the state of Tennessee and Memphis, Tennessee, and across this state and across this country in the middle of what has...
    LONDONDERRY N.H. (CNN) — President Donald Trump told supporters at his campaign rally on Friday night that Sen. Kamala Harris isn’t competent enough to be the Democrats’ vice presidential nominee, suggesting that his daughter and adviser, Ivanka Trump, would be a better candidate for such a role. Speaking in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Trump made fun of the California Democrat’s failed 2020 presidential campaign and suggested that his daughter, who is also a presidential adviser, would be a better vice presidential contender. “You know, I want to see the first woman president also but I don’t want to see a woman president get into that position the way she’d do it — and she’s not competent. She’s not competent. They’re all saying, ‘We want Ivanka.’ I don’t blame you,” Trump said. The attack on Harris came a day after the president wrapped the Republican National Convention, which focused a large portion...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Demonstrators will pack the streets for the 4th annual Jubilee Parade on Saturday. The parade is scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m. on Freedom Corner. Organizers say the parade commemorates the 150th anniversary of the original parade and the passage of the 15th amendment. A Black voting right forum will take place at the end of the parade. You’re asked to wear a mask and practice social distancing if you plan on attending. Organizations expected to partake in the parade include: Stop the Violence Pittsburgh The Black Political Empowerment Project The Pittsburgh Chapter of the NAACP BlaQK OPS Take Action Mon Valley U.S. Buffalo Soldiers Bike Division OnePA Pittsburgh Branch of National Council of Negro Women Vote PA West End P.O.W.E.R. Alliance for Police Accountability Casa San Jose League of Women Voters New Afrikan Independence Party and others.
    Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump told supporters at his campaign rally on Friday night that Sen. Kamala Harris isn't competent enough to be the Democrats' vice presidential nominee, suggesting that his daughter and adviser, Ivanka Trump, would be a better candidate for such a role. Speaking in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Trump made fun of the California Democrat's failed 2020 presidential campaign and suggested that his daughter, who is also a presidential adviser, would be a better vice presidential contender. "You know, I want to see the first woman president also, but I don't want to see a woman president get into that position the way she'd do it -- and she's not competent. She's not competent. They're all saying, 'We want Ivanka.' I don't blame you," Trump said. The attack on Harris came a day after the President wrapped the Republican National Convention, which focused a large portion of its program...
    When Americans think of the Civil Rights Movement, they think of icons like Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lewis — men with such a gift for oration that the words of their speeches are forever ingrained in American history. Today, however, there is no central leader unifying the marches and rallies for racial justice across America.  There is no shortage of passionate young activists, nor is there a shortage of inspiration for change. The makeup of the movement simply looks different. And while it is often criticized for being decentralized, some of the young activists at its core tell CBS News that that's actually by design. "I think that this movement doesn't need a central leader," 23-year-old Chelsea Miller, who co-founded Freedom March NYC in the wake of George Floyd's killing, told CBS News. "Because when you cut off one head, there are still dozens, hundreds, thousands of heads operating....
    PHOENIX (AP) — A diversity report released Friday on Major League Baseball showed a modest increase in its overall diversity hiring practices, spurred by its improved gender diversity. The Institute for Diversity and Ethics and Sport at Central Florida gave MLB an overall score of 80.7, which was a letter grade of B. That’s up from a 79.5 in 2019. The grade for racial hiring dropped slightly from 89.4 to an 88.7 for a B-plus while gender hiring increased from 69.6 to 72.7 for a C. Richard Lapchick, the institute’s director and lead report author, called baseball’s gender hiring improvement a “highlight” of this year’s study. At the beginning of the 2020 season, there were 21 women who had on-field coaching or player development positions, which is up from seven in 2018. “It wasn’t that long ago that a thought about a woman on the field was not in anyone’s...
    Michelle Obama has said that, to many white people, black people 'don't exist' — while citing a story about a time a white woman cut her and her daughters in line when she was incognito.  The 56-year-old uploaded episode five of 'The Michelle Obama Podcast' on Spotify on August 26, and while chatting with her friends Kelly Dibble, Denielle Pemberton-Heard, and Dr. Sharon Malone, she highlighted a troubling reality for black people in America. 'What the white community doesn’t understand about being a person of color in this nation is that there are daily slights, in our workplaces where people talk over you, or people don’t even see you,' she said.  New ep: Michelle Obama spoke with with her friends Kelly Dibble, Denielle Pemberton-Heard, and Dr. Sharon Malone in the new episode her podcast  Reality: Obama (with Pemberton-Heard, right, and Malone, left) said that to many white people, black people 'don't exist'...
    Former first lady Michelle Obama said on her podcast Thursday that white America views black people as invisible — unless they're seeing those black people as a threat, according to the New York Post. Obama recalled times when she was in public and treated with disrespect because when she wasn't surrounded by Secret Service, white people didn't pay her any attention. "We were stopping to get ice cream, and I had told the Secret Service to stand back because we were trying to be normal, trying to go in," Obama said. "When I'm just a black woman, I notice that white people don't even see me. … I'm standing there with two little black girls, another black female adult, they're in soccer uniforms. And a white woman cuts right in front of us to order. Like, she didn't even see us. "All she saw was a black person, or...
    London — As charities and police report a sharp rise in domestic abuse cases amid the coronavirus pandemic, hundreds of people protested in London over a local government's plan to evict a domestic violence charity for black women from its premises at the end of this month. The increase in domestic violence cases around the world during the COVID-19 crisis has been called a shadow pandemic. CBS News has documented the rise in London, which has coincided with the wave of protests against racial injustice prompted by the killing of George Floyd in the U.S. With that backdrop, plans by Hackney Council, the local government in one of London's 32 boroughs, to evict one of the only organizations dedicated specifically to helping black women suffering abuse, has prompted anger. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "This is in the middle of COVID, and we are at high risk,"...
    Former first lady Michelle Obama said on her podcast Thursday that “white America” acts like black women — including herself — don’t exist. “When I’ve been completely incognito, during the eight years in the White House, walking the dogs on the canal, people will come up and pet my dogs, but will not look me in the eye. They don’t know it’s me,” the former first lady said in “The Michelle Obama Podcast.” “What white folks don’t understand, it’s like that is so telling of how white America views people who are not like them. You know, we don’t exist. And when we do exist, we exist as a threat. And that, that’s exhausting,” Obama continued. “What the white community doesn’t understand about being a person of color in this nation is that there are daily slights, in our workplaces where people talk over you, or people don’t even see...
    On Wednesday, a video featuring Meghan Markle talking to the legendary feminist author Gloria Steinem dropped online—the latest declaration of Meghan’s intent to participate in the 2020 election. As The Daily Beast first reported a few weeks ago, Meghan is determined to play a role in firing up the youth and Black vote in November. Although she has not overtly endorsed Biden and Harris (as yet), given her 2016 vow to leave the country if Trump got elected, her mentions this time round of voting to “deliver change,” and a discussion about voter intimidation and voter suppression, it seems fairly clear which side she is on. Indeed, at the outset of the newly published chat, Steinem firmly claims Meghan as a Democrat when she says: “Really, we’ve been rescued by women of color in all of our recent elections because of a vote of conscience and compassion. The heart...
    Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said at the Republican National Committee’s 2020 convention on Thursday that President Donald Trump is not a racist and that the real racism taking place in this country is the high rate of abortion among blacks. “President Trump does not dabble in identity politics,” Carson said. “He wants everyone to succeed and believes in the adage, ‘a rising tide lifts all boats.’ Many on the other side love to incite division by claiming that President Trump is a racist. They could not be more wrong.” He went on to say: Years ago, Jesse Jackson gave Donald Trump an award for the economic opportunities he created for black people. In Palm Beach, Florida, Donald Trump led the crusade to allow blacks and Jews into private clubs and resorts. One of the first things he did as president was bring the Office of Historically Black...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Robin Thede’s face lights up when she hears that the deliciously clever humor of her “A Black Lady Sketch Show” provokes a laugh-out-loud response. “That means the most. That’s the whole point,” said Thede, who created, produces and acts in the HBO show, with its critical raves underlined by groundbreaking Emmy nominations. A tickled viewer demonstrates that “we connected at a human level ... and that is the biggest gift I can give to people, especially for Black women, because we just don’t have it,” Thede said. She cites the “duh” moments prompted by the show’s rarity. “People are saying why didn’t we exist? We had ‘Chappelle’s Show,’ we had ‘In Living Color,’ we have these great sketch shows in Black media traditions,” Thede said, “but never where women were at the forefront. And why not?” “A Black Lady Sketch Show” illustrates what’s been missing. It...
    Kenosha Sheriff David Beth takes part in press conferences about racial unrest in the wake of Jacob Blake shooting. Brandon Bell/Getty Images Kenosha Sheriff David Beth has been taking a front and center role in the unrest that has been spurred by the police shooting of Jacob Blake.  Beth, though, came under fire in 2018 after he went on a rant that was seen as racist and insensitive.  The generalized comments were made in reaction to the arrest of four Black men and women who were charged with a shoplifting incident that resulted in a police chase and crash.  During the press conference, he says that some people "aren't worth saving" and need to be locked away in warehouses so they can't get women pregnant.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Kenosha, Wisconsin, is under a national spotlight as the latest epicenter of racial unrest following the...
    Bettye LaVette, “Blackbirds” (Verve) The wise intuition and emotional commitment of Bettye LaVette’s interpretative skills find an ideal setting on “Blackbirds,” a collection of songs mostly associated with Black women, from Nina Simone to Billie Holiday. Supported by a quartet including producer-drummer Steve Jordan, keyboardist Leon Pendarvis, guitarist Smokey Hormel and bassist Tom Barney, LaVette’s customary transformation of the source material intensifies its sentiments, whether of abandonment, yearning and even sheer brutality, as on “Strange Fruit” and its recurrent relevance. Blending soul, jazz and blues and recorded as if on an intimate stage, “Blackbirds” has substantial emotional heft. The songs on the nine-track album, which also features a string quartet on several tunes, include details that LaVette recognizes and embraces as connections to her own life, with the personal links boosting their resonance, even if they may remain hidden from outsiders. With its smooth electric piano and biting guitar lines,...
    Wednesday on CNN, network senior political reporter Nia-Malika Henderson characterized President Donald Trump’s message in the Republican National Convention as telling his white supporters they “won’t have to share that power in his America.” Discussing Mark and Patricia McCloskey, Henderson said, “Think about what that couple did. They drew guns on people outside their home on a sidewalk because they were Black. I mean, that’s exactly what happened in that instance, and that is the message, I think, that Donald Trump wants to deliver to particularly white people — that he is the one standing between the lawlessness of Black and brown people. And he is the one that can essentially help white Americans maintain their status. He gets black people to sort of vouch for him and say that he’s not a racist, and, in fact, say that America’s not even really a racist country. So, listen, this could very well work because I think, you know, there is some...
    These are the teams and athletes who refused to play in protest of the Jacob Blake shooting Amazon just opened the first location of its highly anticipated new chain of grocery stores. See inside. "I Felt Beautiful, But You Made Me Feel Different": Black Women on Simply Existing With Hair in America The State of Black Beauty: Dont Touch My Hair ELLE See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Nearly 30% of office workers will take less time off this summer Veuer How to pop a pimple yourself, according to Dr. Pimple Poppers tips INSIDER How to explain a coronavirus-related layoff on your resume Buzz60 Run out of things to do? Try one of these very specific hobbies. The Washington Post Singles now displaying COVID antibody test results in dating apps! Buzz60 ...
    CNN’s Nia-Malika Henderson dissected President Donald Trump’s appeal to white voters during their post RNC coverage on Wednesday night — noting that his message to them is, “you won’t have to share that power in his America.” She pointed to Mark and Patricia McCloskey, the couple who pointed guns at protesters marching past their home in St. Louis, “They drew guns on people outside their home on a sidewalk because they were Black,” she added. “I mean, that’s exactly what happened in that instance, and that is the message, I think, that Donald Trump wants to deliver to particularly white people. That he is the one standing between the lawlessness of Black and brown people.” She called attention to the fear some people have of sharing power in America and claimed Trump is essentially telling white voters that he will help them retain their status. Henderson also noted that many speakers at the RNC pushed the message that Trump is an advocate...
    (CNN)A cascade of outside crises -- a dangerous impending hurricane, racial unrest in Wisconsin -- lurked in the background of the third night of President Donald Trump's convention which sought to project a sense of command.If Tuesday's legally dubious use of his official powers illustrated the advances afforded an incumbent, the events requiring presidential leadership that swirled Wednesday underscored its burdens.Almost the entirety of Wednesday's program was taped ahead of time, which prevented addressing the two crises in real time. Trump complained last week that some Democrats' speeches seemed dated -- namely, former first lady Michelle Obama, who he noted used a coronavirus death count that was a few days old.When it came time for the sole live address of the night -- from Vice President Mike Pence -- the crises received a mention amid an otherwise lashing attack on Joe Biden. But by and large, the convention largely moved...
    (CNN)By the time civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer delivered a speech at the 1971 founding meeting of the National Women's Political Caucus, she was a nationally recognized leader in the movement for Black voting rights. In the tradition of Black feminist thought, as reflected in the earlier abolition movement, Hamer fused a desire to eradicate both racism and sexism in American society. Keisha BlainHamer, also one of the organization's founders, delivered a powerful speech before the more than 300 American women gathered in Washington, DC to celebrate the group's official launch. She cautioned those in the audience to be mindful that the fight for an inclusive democracy was far from over. It's a message that reverberates today—and one that Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, reiterated when she evoked Hamer's name at the DNC."As I stand here today my mind goes back to the problems that we have...
    VIDEO2:4702:47Michelle Obama's tips on what it takes for Black girls to become leadersInvest in You: Ready. Set. Grow. Michelle Obama has a message for Black girls in America. "Don't ever forget how much power you have." The former first lady recently relayed that missive to 1,000 attendees of the Black Girls Lead conference, which was held virtually this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. The annual event, put on by Black Girls Rock, is aimed at empowering Black girls, ages 13 to 18, to become leaders.  Yet on top of issues such as the pay gap and lack of diversity in the C-suite, recent events like Covid-19, school closings and the reckoning with America's history of racial inequality are also weighing heavily on teens' minds.In this screengrab, Michelle Obama is seen during the 2020 BET Awards.BET Awards 2020 | Getty Images"Some folks are going to try to tell you that you have...
    WASHINGTON - August 26 is Women’s Equality Day, which in the U.S. commemorates the adoption of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920 granting women the right to vote.    Suffragist Village: Leaders in the Battle for Women's Right to Vote in the US Through the mid-19th century and early 20th centuries, women from all backgrounds pushed for social reforms that affected their lives. They believed true equality for women could only be achieved by gaining the right to vote. It also highlights the gender-based discrimination almost all women, particularly women from the two largest minority groups in the U.S., continue to experience.  On the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, a Pew Research Center report indicated that “while many Americans say the last decade has seen progress in the fight for gender equality, a majority say the country still hasn’t gone far enough in giving women equal...
    Today is Women’s Equality Day, and the 100th anniversary of the formal adoption of the 19th Amendment into the U.S. Constitution. As the League of Women Voters of Minneapolis, a direct descendant of the national organization that led the battle for a woman’s right to vote, commemorates this hard-fought achievement, we recognize that racism both permeated and fractured the suffrage movement. As we aspire to better reflect the diversity of our city, we acknowledge there are scars from the past we must continue to heal. In 1866, a powerful group of abolitionists (including founders Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Frederick Douglass) formed an alliance shortly after the end of the Civil War. Their goal was universal suffrage and they were committed to securing voting rights for all American citizens irrespective of color, race or sex. Unfortunately, congressional politics resulted in a watered-down version of what would become the 15th Amendment,...
    MU professor no longer teaching, still employed after mask remark to Chinese student Warriors reportedly looking to select player, not trade No. 2 pick Gabrielle Union, Keke Palmer and More Open Up About Black Hair Discrimination in Glamour PSA Gabrielle Union, Keke Palmer, Uzo Aduba and Marsai Martin are getting candid about the discrimination Black women face over their hair. Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad The stars teamed up to film a powerful PSA, "I'VE BEEN TOLD,"  released in tandem with Glamour's September cover story, which is features the stories of six Black women across the country and the stigmas they've faced related to their hair. At the beginning of the video, each actor recalls common microaggressions Black women are confronted with over their natural hairstyles. "I've been told it's too big," Union, 47, said. "I've been asked, 'Is it real?'" Aduba, 39, added....
    Glamour's September issue is all about black hair, with a cover that spotlights six black women who say they have faced discrimination at work because of their natural locks. The women's monthly decided to forgo celebrity cover stars this month in favor of highlighting the stories of Farryn Johnson, Brittany Noble, Rachel Sakabo, Destiny Tompkins, and Kimberly and Gale Young-McLear — all black women who say that they were targeted at their jobs for their hair and, in some cases, lost those jobs when they refused to change their natural styles. Presented together, their stories intend to make a powerful case for the CROWN Act, a law that prohibits race-based hair discrimination in employment and educational opportunities, which has so far only been passed in seven states.  Spotlight: Glamour's September issue focuses on black hair and was guest edited by Ashley Alese Edwards One of the cover stars is Brittany Noble, 33, who...
    CBS Love Island's Tre Forte CBS reality show Love Island came back with a bang on Monday, August 24 with a two-hour premiere that introduced viewers to the 11 singles ready to mingle on the new season. Among them was Tre Forte, a former Ohio State University football player. But he’s in a bit of hot water with some of the fans over some old tweets that have surfaced where he says he doesn’t want Black women. Tre is cancelled. He’s got to go. #LoveIslandUSA pic.twitter.com/XhXqTOfVoS — A. St. Patrick (@rosegoldacacia) August 25, 2020 A fan whose Twitter handle is Rose Gold Acacia posted some screenshots of the tweets from 2013, writing that “Tre is cancelled. He’s got to go.” The tweets in question show a woman asking her followers, “How would you n*ggas feel if black chicks went to all the white boys?” To which...
    LeBron James knows his critics are tired of his vocal support for social justice, but following the shooting of African-American man Jacob Blake by Wisconsin police on Sunday, the Los Angeles Lakers star found himself delivering a sadly familiar refrain. 'I know people get tired of hearing me say it, but we are scared as black people in America,' James said following the Lakers' Game 4 win over the Portland Trail Blazers at the NBA's bubble near Orlando on Monday. 'Black men, black women, black kids - we are terrified.' Blake was shot seven times by Kenosha, Wisconsin police on Sunday after officers responded to a domestic disturbance call. Video of the incident went viral Monday, showing police shooting the 29-year-old father in the back as he attempted to enter a van.  According his attorney, Ben Crump, Blake's three sons were seated in the van and witnessed the shooting. Following...
    On August 26, 2020, Alice in Wonderland will get some company. She will be joined in New York City’s Central Park by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Sojourner Truth, the first statues there of women who, unlike Alice, actually existed. The monument is a gift to the park from Monumental Women, a non-profit organization formed in 2014. The group has raised the $1.5 million necessary to commission, install, and maintain the new “Women’s Rights Pioneers Monument” and so achieve its goal of “breaking the bronze ceiling” in Central Park. Preparations for its unveiling on the centennial anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted suffrage (that is, the right to vote) to women, are in full swing. Celebratory articles have been written. The ceremony will be live-streamed. Viola Davis, Meryl Streep, Zoe Saldana, Rita Moreno, and America Ferrera have recorded monologues in English and Spanish as Stanton, Anthony, and Truth. The Pioneers...
    (CNN)When it comes to women and power in America, 2020 is a landmark, but also a question. We are marking the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment enfranchising women even as we ask: Whose votes -- and stories -- are left out of the narrative? What of the work toward equity that has yet to be done? We are seeing Sen. Kamala Harris take the stage as a vice presidential candidate: the first Black woman, the first South Asian woman, on a major party ticket. But we are also asking: What will it take for a woman to become President of the United States? In 1917, members of the National Woman's Party picketed the White House, carrying banners that included the question: "Mr. President, How Long Must Women Wait For Liberty?" In 2020, players in the Women's National Basketball Association are competing in a bubble without fans but...
    Courtesy of The Ms. Foundation for Women BI Raquel Willis is the director of communications for the Ms. Foundation for Women, the former executive editor of Out magazine, and a Black trans activist.   As a lifelong advocate for Black trans rights, Willis has an extensive career in organizing and storytelling through an intersectional framework.  Willis spoke at the historic march for Black trans lives in Brooklyn on June 14, telling the crowd, "the truth is that we're more than enough."  Willis is on Insider's list of Doers: 25 trailblazers creating hope and inspiring us. Check out the full list here. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Before she arrived at the rally for Black trans lives at the foot of the Brooklyn Museum on June 14, Raquel Willis didn't know what to expect. As a longtime advocate for Black trans rights, Willis, 29, had...
    Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse passes B bill to boost Postal Service Trump seeks to overcome eroding support among women Here are the states where Kanye West is on the ballot MORE said he did not “feel pressure” to name a Black woman as his running mate leading up his selection of Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTrump seeks to overcome eroding support among women Does Trump suffer from 'self-destructive syndrome'? Could Kamala Harris transform law enforcement as the vice president? MORE (D-Calif.). "No, I didn't feel pressure to select a Black woman," Biden told ABC’s Robin Roberts in his first-ever joint interview with Harris. “But what I do think ... is that the government should look like the people, look like the country." "Fifty-one percent of the people in this country are women," he continued. "As that old expression goes, 'women hold up half the sky,' and in order to be able...
    By RUSSELL CONTRERAS, Associated Press RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — Kamala Harris made history last week by becoming the first Black woman to be nominated to run for vice president on a major party’s ticket. But the first Black woman to run for vice president in the nation’s history was trailblazing newspaperwoman Charlotta Spears Bass. The groundbreaking journalist and civil rights activist who ran in 1952 on the Progressive Party ticket is the subject of a new PBS/WNET “American Masters” short. The 12-minute film is the final installment of a series focusing on 26 American women from 1890 to 1920, like Mexican American journalist Jovita Idar and Tye Leung Schulze, the first Chinese American woman to vote in the U.S. Born in 1888 in Little Compton, Rhode Island (others have said she was born in Sumter, South Carolina), Bass rose to become publisher and owner of The California Eagle in...
    RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — Kamala Harris made history last week by becoming the first Black woman to be nominated to run for vice president on a major party’s ticket. But the first Black woman to run for vice president in the nation’s history was trailblazing newspaperwoman Charlotta Spears Bass. The groundbreaking journalist and civil rights activist who ran in 1952 on the Progressive Party ticket is the subject of a new PBS/WNET “American Masters” short. The 12-minute film is the final installment of a series focusing on 26 American women from 1890 to 1920, like Mexican American journalist Jovita Idar and Tye Leung Schulze, the first Chinese American woman to vote in the U.S. Born in 1888 in Little Compton, Rhode Island (others have said she was born in Sumter, South Carolina), Bass rose to become publisher and owner of The California Eagle in 1912 following the death...
    This was a big week for Black women’s leadership, with California Sen. Kamala Harris officially nominated as the Democratic candidate for vice president, alongside presidential nominee former Vice President Joe Biden. In her acceptance speech as the first Black woman and first South Asian to be nominated for vice president by a major party, Harris emphasized that her mother raised her and her sister Maya to be “proud, strong Black women” who knew and took pride in their Indian heritage. Harris’s historic position places her within a long lineage of Black women who’ve led the way not only in politics, but also in social movements for voting rights, racial justice, and more. In case you missed it, here are a few of Prism’s top stories celebrating the leadership of Black women.   Black women’s fight for the franchise is reshaping democracy (Carolyn Copeland) “We have to be more...
    (CNN)Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden says he did not feel pressure to select a Black woman as his running mate, describing to ABC the motive behind choosing California Sen. Kamala Harris. "No, I didn't feel pressure to select a Black woman," Biden told ABC's Robin Roberts in a newly-released clip from a joint interview with Harris set to air in full Sunday night. "But I - what I do think and I've said it before, and you've heard me say it. I've probably said it on your show with you, is that the government should look like the people, look like the country.""Fifty-one percent of the people in this country are women," he continued. "As that old expression goes, women hold up half the sky, and in order to be able to succeed, you've got to be dealt in across the board, and no matter what you say, you cannot,...
    By PRINCESSSAFIYA BYERS of Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service. MILWAUKEE (AP) — After spending time in Minneapolis watching protests unfold after the death of George Floyd, Annia Leonard returned to Milwaukee prepared to join similar marches in the city. But the activist said she was met with resistance. “Minneapolis was like a war zone,” she said. “Being there made me want to be louder about this issue, but when I attended protests in Milwaukee, there wasn’t space for me.” Over the past few months, Black women in Milwaukee have participated in protests – organizing, educating and advocating for change. Yet some told NNS they feel invisible in the movement. Many said they feel left out of decision-making processes, leadership positions and the overall narrative of the importance of Black lives. ___ The nonprofit news outlet Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service provided this article to The Associated Press through a collaboration with Institute...
    By SAFIYA CHARLES, The Montgomery Advertiser MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Aubrina Mack’s dark anniversary passed on Aug. 15 largely unnoticed. Fourteen years gone. She’s been missing since she was 21. Aug. 28 marks another grim observance. One year since Donna Calloway went missing in Montgomery. She would be 41 by now. The two Black women seemingly vanished without a trace. Their photos remain logged in the state’s missing persons database attached to scant details about their disappearances. Calloway was last seen leaving her residence. A little below average height at 5 feet 3 inches, she has black hair and brown eyes. A tattoo on her left leg displays her middle name, Michelle, and on her thigh a picture of a rose with the name Annie. Mack’s description is similar. 5 feet 3 inches tall with black hair and brown eyes. Last seen leaving her home on Central Street in 2006,...
    One of the industries hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic is also one of the industries on which others rest, often invisibly. Without child care, parents struggle to do their own jobs. And child care is in a major crisis. One in five child care jobs has disappeared since February. Those losses are a jobs crisis for women, and women of color in particular: This is a workforce that’s 95% women, 20% Latina, and 19% Black. By contrast, the workforce as a whole is 47% women, 8% Latina, and 7% Black women. So when tens of thousands of child care workers lose their jobs, it’s hitting people who are already discriminated against and disadvantaged in the labor market. Child care workers don't have financial leeway to take a hit like this—the average full-time, year-round worker in the industry is paid just under $30,000, with Latina and Black women making even less. They’re also unlikely to have...
    (CNN)Celebrities across Hollywood are coming to Megan Thee Stallion's defense after she shed more light this week on her July shooting.During an Instagram Live stream on Thursday, "WAP" rapper Stallion publicly accused Canadian rapper Tory Lanez of shooting her in the feet -- adding more details to her original account of the July incident."You shot me," she said, addressing Lanez in her video. "And you got your publicist and your people going to these blogs lying... Stop lying. Why lie? I don't understand."Stallion didn't initially state that Lanez was behind the shooting. But after speaking out, she has received support from several celebrities who point to the incident as another example of Black women protecting Black men -- without reciprocation.In a Friday evening tweet, actor Michael B. Jordan told Stallion he admired her.Read More"Meg I admire your courage and applaud you for speaking up. We must Support Black Women, Protect...
    As Sen. Elizabeth Warren used her Democratic National Convention remarks to argue that child care is a critical part of the country’s infrastructure and endorse plans to “raise the wages of every child care worker,” some eagle-eyed viewers noticed a subtle statement in the background: letters carefully arranged in student cubbies spelling out “BLM,” the acronym for Black Lives Matter. Given Warren’s focus on the child care workforce, it was a relevant message—Black women, along with other women of color, comprise a significant portion of early childhood care and education workers, and the child care woes wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic have underscored how much their lives, livelihoods, and rights as workers matter. In the United States, women of color are 40% of the overwhelmingly female child care industry workforce, which is also 22% immigrant women. These administrators, teachers, and aides spend their days performing some of the most...
    Senator Kamala Harris is the first Indian American and first Black woman to be nominated for vice president on a major party ticket, but, as many historians have noted, Harris is not the first Black woman to run for vice president. That distinction belongs to the journalist and political activist Charlotta Bass, who was the editor of The California Eagle for nearly 30 years, one of the country’s oldest Black newspapers, which covered women’s suffrage, police brutality, the Klu Klux Klan, and discriminatory hiring and housing practices. Bass joined the Progressive Party ticket in 1952 on an antiracist platform that called for fair housing and equal access to healthcare. Bass’s exclusion from the public narrative signals a tendency to “sideline Black radical politics,” says author and historian Keisha Blain. AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, breaking with convention. I’m Amy Goodman, with Nermeen Shaikh. Tonight, Joe Biden will accept...
    A Black Lives Matter activist in Chicago warned late this week that people better meet their demands because they are going to get what they want regardless of whether or not people choose to comply. The activist, who identified herself as Taylor Norwood during a different part of the press conference, repeatedly blasted Chicago Democratic Mayor Lori Lightfoot for allegedly “not protecting the black women in this city.” Norwood appeared to accuse Lightfoot of “creating problems in black and brown communities to protect white people” and claimed that Lightfoot was robbing them “of their right to vote.” “This is our city, our city, and we’re taking that s**t back,” Norwood said. “We have demands and they need to be met and I feel like I’ve been saying this too much, we’re not asking you anything. We’re telling you what’s about to happen with your permission or not.” “You can listen...
    The Atlantic writer Jemele Hill offered her praise for the “humanity” on display at the just-concluded Democratic National Convention and said, by contrast, President Donald Trump has proven her controversial labeling of him as a “white supremacist” back in 2017 “more right every single day.” Speaking with MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace, Hill agreed with then Deadline: White House host that Black women played a key role in turning around Joe Biden’s political fortunes in the 2020 primary. And she noted how that demographic helped shape the look of the party at its virtual convention. “I do think that the scope of the Democratic Party is really changed because black women not only have kind of taken the mantle just becoming more prominent and seizing and walking into their own power,” Hill said. “That’s very appropriate considering Kamala Harris is now the vice presidential nominee.” “Frankly, there’s a lot of black women, a lot of people...
    (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images) From Harriet Tubman to Fannie Lou Hamer to Shirley Chisholm to Michelle Obama, America has a long history of hating, attacking and severely disrespecting any Black woman who rises to a position of power. These attacks are often in the cross-sections of race and gender, but at times it is hard to discern when a race-neutral or gender-neutral attack is shaped by racial or gender bias. Senator Kamala Harris’s historic nomination for vice president led to immediate and vicious criticism, and we all know it is only the beginning. The attacks are personal to her, but for many Black women, the strikes are a variation of the attacks we have all experienced. Read More: Amazon takes down ‘Joe and the Hoe’ shirts belittling Kamala Harris Some of the attacks are racist, like the birtherism attack or arguments that she is not African-American....
    A recent TikTok showing a Georgia officer tasing a Black woman on her front porch has now gone viral. The video depicting this week’s altercation has been viewed more than 14 million times and shared upward of 215,000 times. Hide The video allegedly begins just after the officer approaches a group of Black women on their porch. According to the Root, the officer threatened to arrest one of the women, 22-year-old Kyndesia Smith, after warning that she was speaking too loudly. Hide “We can talk if we want to, I’m not going nowhere,” she can be heard saying in the video. “It doesn’t matter. You’re on our property. We did not call you,” she continues, moments before the situation escalates and the officer grabs Smith, struggling to detain her. He eventually pulls out his stun gun after telling the woman to get on the ground, and shortly after fires it...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The region’s only Black-owned talk-radio station is celebrating its founders day. This comes on the heels of Sen. Kamala Harris becoming the first Black woman, and Asian American woman, to accept the nomination for vice president. WURD Radio has made its mark in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and as the only Black-owned and operated station celebrates the life and legacy of its founder, Sara Lomax-Reese, the current CEO, says “it’s absolutely critical for our voices to be heard even louder now more than ever before.” Lomax-Reese’s father, Dr. Walter P. Lomax Jr., advocated for economic empowerment, wealth creation, and the health and wellness in the Black community. “He was a physician, he was an incredibly successful entrepreneur, he was a philanthropist. He contributed to a lot of the African American arts and institutions in the city,” Lomax-Reese said. Founded in 2002, the station continues to champion the...
    (CNN)When California Sen. Kamala Harris became the first Black and South Asian woman to accept a major party's vice presidential nomination on Wednesday night, she credited the historic moment to generations of men and women before her who fought for civil and voting rights. In particular, she praised some of the women who paved the way for her and helped secure the passage of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right vote."Without fanfare or recognition, they organized and testified and rallied and marched and fought -- not just for their vote, but for a seat at the table," she said. "These women and the generations that followed worked to make democracy and opportunity real in the lives of all of us who followed," she said, adding that their efforts also paved the way for Hillary Clinton and the country's first Black President, Barack Obama."These women inspired us to pick...
    Left to right: Former US Senator Carol Moseley Braun and Democratic vice-presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images, Win McNamee/Getty Images) We live in interesting and challenging times. Not only is the world experiencing unprecedented disease with COVID-19, but the planet itself is shuddering with climate change, and our assumptions about economic and social relationships are all in flux. In the midst of all this, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has given us a ray of sunshine and of hope in selecting Senator Kamala Harris to be his running mate in the presidential election of 2020.   Senator Harris creates a mold that our country and the world has not seen before. She is not only a woman of color, a daughter of immigrants, a highly-educated law enforcement official, a distinguished and active member of the United States Senate, but part of an interracial family who is a member...
    Washington (CNN)Just because the speech wasn't too surprising doesn't mean that it wasn't impactful.During the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday, Kamala Harris accepted her party's vice presidential nomination -- and as she did, she brought a rich history of Black womanhood with her, and embraced what makes her different at a moment afflicted by division.Unlike some past cohorts of politicians, Harris didn't downplay the tapestry of her identity for the sake of a gauzy concept of unity. (Why would she? Hang-ups with her identity say more about others than her.) Instead, she elevated what makes her stand out -- in ways big and, seemingly, small."Family is my beloved Alpha Kappa Alpha, our Divine Nine, and my HBCU brothers and sisters," Harris said.She was referring to the nickname for America's nine historically Black fraternities and sororities, and nodding to the fact that she's the first graduate of a historically Black college...
    Mixing a former prosecutor's polish with the deeply personal, Harris also spoke of her Jamaican father and getting a "stroller's eye view" of the civil rights movement as her parents protested in the streets in the 1960s. "There is no vaccine for racism," Harris said. "We have got to do the work." Harris addressed a party that has staked its future on bringing together a racially diverse coalition of voters. She was preceded in the convention program by Barack Obama, meaning the nation's first Black president introduced the woman trying to be the first Black person to hold the vice presidency. Obama said Harris was an "ideal partner" for Biden and was "more than prepared for the job." Harris is a former district attorney and California state attorney general. She promised to speak "truths" to the American public. She said she and Biden, who tapped her as his running mate...
    Full text: Harris remarks to the 2020 Democratic National Convention Khawaja must oust Smith or Warner to earn Aussie recall: Langer Kamala Harris Pays Tribute to Her Late Mother as She Accepts Historic VP Nomination © Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images Kamala Harris made official her place in history during Wednesday night's Democratic National Convention, accepting the party's vice presidential nomination and cementing her status as the first Black woman and first person of Indian descent to do so. Harris' nomination speech came courtesy of sister Maya Harris, niece Meena Harris and step-daughter Ella Emhoff, who celebrated her as the "world's greatest stepmom" and a "fierce, formidable, phenomenal woman." "We could not be more excited to share you with the world," they said. "That I am here tonight is a testament to the dedication of generations before me," Harris said onstage. "Women and men who believed so fiercely in...