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    Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia said on Tuesday said Democrats are not in a 'rush' to pass President Joe Biden's economic agenda – a day after he infuriated some House progressives by refusing to endorse the president's plan. Negotiators have yet to iron out multiple policy issues in the 'framework' agreement the White House announced Friday – and Manchin has refused to endorse it as of yet. He said the bill's tax provisions – which include a new surtax on millionaires' income – amount to 'overhauling the entire tax code.' 'That is tremendous and there needs to be input,' he said.  Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) speaks with an aide at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., November 2, 2021. 'Time's going to be needed. And there's no rush right now,' he said, as negotiators continue to work on a budget framework 'I don't think anybody intends to harm our economy or create a hardship on people. But I believe everyone should be paying thei fair share,' he said, CNN reported. 'Time's going to be needed. And there's no rush right...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden's sweeping $3 trillion domestic agenda is finally coming together. No, seriously. After months of negotiations and a series of setbacks between disparate corners of his own party, Biden is on the cusp of clinching not one but two massive legislative achievements with sources on all sides signaling the clear goal and momentum to finalize everything this week. But it's not a done deal yet, and as we've seen repeatedly, the trust deficit between moderates and progressives is fully capable of pushing Biden's agenda off track. Democrats are still working through some internal disagreements over Medicare expansion, immigration and prescription drug pricing, and even once all parties agree to a deal, legislative text has to be finalized, members have to actually read the bill and then they will vote. The bottom line is that Democrats still have some work to do, but if Biden and Democratic leaders can pull off an agreement over the next 72 hours, they will have made a massive dent in reshaping the role the US government plays in family life -- not to...
    The month of March blows in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. August, 2021 has that beat. This month blew in like Cerberus and blew out like the Minotaur. Two stories eclipsed all others in Washington at the end of August. Hurricane Ida lashed the Gulf Coast and then churned through the south. Staying on message, the remnants of Ida will eventually drench an already sodden Washington mid-week. Afghanistan is Afghanistan as the U.S. departs. So, we take an examination of these two issues and how they will resonate in the coming weeks on Capitol Hill. It’s possible there could be a demand for additional federal spending from Congress to cover the aftermath of Hurricane Ida if the damage is as bad as anticipated. There is a short-term and long-term equation here. The first question involves immediate need and if FEMA’s coffers are flush enough with cash to help. The answer to the first question is yes. For the initial aftermath of Ida, FEMA will pull money from the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) or "Durf" in Congressional...
    Republican lawmakers on Thursday introduced the Vaccine Passport and Voter ID Harmonization Act, legislation that would require states mandating vaccine passports to also mandate voter ID requirements. The Daily Caller News Foundation first obtained the text of the bill, introduced by Kevin Cramer of North Dakota in the Senate and Nancy Mace of South Carolina in the House, “requiring states and local jurisdictions that institute vaccine passports to require voter identification in federal elections.” “It makes no sense for Democrats to adamantly oppose commonsense Voter ID policies which protect the integrity of our elections,” Cramer said in a statement. (RELATED: Studies On COVID-19 Vaccine Effects On Fertility Are ‘In The Works,’ CDC Says) “If they’re comfortable making people show their private medical records to simply go to a restaurant, they should be fine having people prove they are who they say they are before they vote,” he continued. “Our legislation shines a light on their hypocrisy.” Vaccine Passport and Voter … by Mary Margaret Olohan The legislation comes as more and more U.S. officials and institutions begin requiring vaccines...
    Legislative language buried inside the 2,700-page infrastructure bill contains language with far more than funds for roads and bridges – with sections meant to boost women in trucking, expunge harmful invasive species, and tweak the mission of Amtrak. One section in the $1.2 trillion bill notes that women make up 47 per cent of the workforce, but just 6.6 per cent of truckers.  It also states that women truck drivers have been demonstrated to be 20 percent less likely to get in a crash than male counterparts. It states the sense of Congress Female truck drivers are less likely to be involved in an accident, according to a provision of the infrastructure bill, which also contains provisions on invasive species and Amtrak funding 'that the trucking industry should explore every opportunity to encourage and support the pursuit and retention of careers in trucking by women, including through programs that support recruitment, driver training, and mentorship.' Another transportation provision also requires research on limousine safety. It specifically seeks research 'into the development of motor vehicle safety standards for side impact protection, roof crush resistance, and...
    O'Reilly went on to predict that like Trump, President Joe Biden would lose reelection because of COVID. People saw a president who could not put out an intelligent fact-based message about COVID and people will remember that," he explained. O'Reilly later added that "Trump and Biden are one-termers because of COVID." Watch the video below to catch more of the conversation: Want more from Glenn Beck?To enjoy more of Glenn's masterful storytelling, thought-provoking analysis and uncanny ability to make sense of the chaos, subscribe to BlazeTV — the largest multi-platform network of voices who love America, defend the Constitution and live the American dream.
    MinnPost photo by Peter CallaghanA two-year budget had to get done by June 30, and the sprinkling of policy items inside of the 13 budget bills were the places where lawmakers could get agreement.If the state motto was the most commonly used phrase at the Minnesota Capitol, the license plates would read “only divided Legislature” instead of “10,000 Lakes.” Unlike the undercount of lakes in Minnesota, however, the line about the Legislature would be true. It is also a convenient explanation for failure, a way to tell advocates and the base voters in each party that the other party blocked the bill. Perhaps if they worked harder at the next election and delivered the “trifecta” of government power — the governor’s office and both chambers of the Legislature — they might pass. The flip side of the same partisan argument is that only by holding at least one of the three levers of power were bad things blocked. Republicans have said something to that effect about tax increases ever since the DFL lost control of the state Senate in Mark...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — While Memorial Day is the unofficial start of summer, boaters in Illinois have extra reason to celebrate. A whopping 555% increase in license plate fees for boat trailers could soon be nearly reversed thanks to a bill that just passed the Illinois House. READ MORE: With Pop-Up Sites Up And Running, Beachgoers Turn Out On Memorial Day For COVID-19 Vaccinations CBS 2’s Tim McNicholas reports from Burnham Harbor and boaters there said they’re finally optimistic about a potential fix. It all started when a 2019 infrastructure bill spiked the renewal fees. Now a fix is finally moving in Springfield. Starting last year, boaters went from paying $18 dollars per year to $118. All in license plate fees. Not for their boats, but for the small trailers they use to haul them. “Paying that much is nuts.” Frank Wagner said he only uses his trailer on Memorial Day and a few other days a year. “Which is just crazy for something like a boat that only hits the road for maybe 50 miles a year,” Wagner said. Since...
    Texas Governor Greg Abbott has vowed to sign a bill into law that would punish the  Lone State's largest cities if they decide to follow Austin and defund their local police departments. In a tweet sent out on Sunday, the Republican governor cited a shooting incident in Austin, where it allegedly took police officers 16 minutes to respond to the crime scene and render aid to a person who had been shot in the head. 'This is what defunding the police looks like,' Abbott wrote. 'Austin in incapable of timely responding to a victim shot in the head.' Texas Governor Greg Abbott, a Republican, on Sunday vowed to sign into law a bill that would punish large cities for defunding their police agencies. Abbott cited a shooting that took place in Austin on Sunday  Abbott has long been railing against Austin for voting to divert $150million away from its police department last year  He continued: 'Texas won't tolerate this. We're about to pass law-that I will sing-that will prevent cities from defunding police. Sanity & safety will return.' The...
    Man killed at a Michigan baby shower after a cannon exploded Democrats to open Trump impeachment trial by recounting Capitol attack Princess Diana Once Told Warren Buffett That This U.S. President Was the Sexiest Man Alive © Provided by People Justin GoffUK Press via Getty Images Princess Diana Princess Diana famously danced with John Travolta at the White House during President Ronald Reagan's time in office, but it was another U.S. president who caught her attention. In a resurfaced 2012 interview with CNBC, Warren Buffett recalled meeting Princess Diana — and finding himself at a loss for words. "I was in a room alone one time with Princess Di at a party. Somehow we find ourselves in this library," he said. "In 15 minutes, I don't think I could take it. I had trouble remembering my name, I couldn't figure out anything to say, and it was a total disaster." RELATED: Princess Diana's Velvet Gown from Her White House Dance with John Travolta Is for Sale Buffett had met Diana once other time, at a party hosted by former Washington Post publisher...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A bill dealing with a voter-approved prohibition on public officials and employees using their offices to benefit themselves, their families or employers is among four new laws that will take effect this week. The other bills involve fines for driving past stopped school buses, insurance policy statements, and election equipment used for recounts. Lawmakers during the 2020 legislative session passed a bill (HB 7009) to help carry out a 2018 constitutional amendment aimed, at least in part, at slowing the revolving door involving public officials and the private sector. In all, lawmakers approved 206 bills during the 2020 session, which ended March 19, with 201 signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis. Most of the new laws, including a state budget, hit the books on July 1 or on Oct. 1. The bill to carry out what was Amendment 12 on the 2018 ballot will take effect Thursday. It was approved without debate or opposition in the House and Senate. Amendment 12 was among a handful of proposed amendments that passed after being put before voters in...
    Steve Bing's trust has been hit with a $30 million demand from a charity after the late multi-millionaire pledged the hefty amount to the organization in 2012, court documents exclusively obtained by DailyMail.com show. Bing had made the commitment to the Motion Picture and Television Fund in September 2012, which was guaranteed to be binding upon Bing's estate and payable after his death. The 55-year-old died on June 22 after jumping from the 27th floor of his Los Angeles apartment, dying with an estimated net worth of $590 million. But months after his death, it was revealed he owed American Express $100,000 in unpaid bills, as well as a $5,000 unpaid massage tab that he racked up in the week before he committed suicide. His daughter Kira Kerkorian, with ex tennis pro Lisa Bonder, was recently granted special executor of his estate, which was valued at just $337,000 - although his properties were not included in that evaluation. The charity's demand, which was filed last month in Superior Court of California in Los Angeles, has to be addressed by Bing's...
    Among the many municipal items on the Denver ballot this November is a measure that would effectively end the Mile High City's three-decade-old prohibition of pit bulls. But while proponents of the concept typically focus their arguments on the general ineffectiveness of breed-specific legislation and how the proposal will not only allow pit-bull owners to emerge from the shadows but give authorities better ways to enhance safety, Teresa Browning has another reason why the ban should go. She says a former domestic partner reported that she was illegally sheltering a pit bull that was actually registered as an approved breed — but because of the Denver law's vague language, she was terrified that the dog would be taken away from her, anyway. "It's something I still worry about," Browning says. "I'm praying that November will end my fear of that happening."Related Stories Here's What Denver Residents Will Be Voting On This Election Denver Campaign to Legalize Pit Bulls Revs Up Cheering, Mourning After Denver Pit Bull Legalization Bill Falls One Vote Short Earlier this year, when Denver City Council...
    Comedian Bill Burr has upset internet warriors with his controversial Saturday Night Live monologue that took a swing at woke culture. The comic took no prisoners during his monologue, addressing everything from people not wearing masks during coronavirus, gay pride - even actor Rick Moranis being assaulted which he jokingly celebrated as a return to a grittier New York City. The tongue-in-cheek joke about Moranis led him to muse whether he would be 'cancelled'.  'I'll probably get canceled for doing that joke how stupid is that canceled thing? 'They're literally running out of people to cancel. They're going after dead people now. They're trying to cancel John Wayne.' Wayne, who died in 1979, has been attacked in recent years over his mymisogynistic and racist views.   Comedian Bill Burr's SNL monologue, which touched on cancel culture and being woke, was slammed on social media for being 'homophobic,' 'misogynistic' and 'obnoxious'  People said now was not the time for Burr's monologue, but he did have some supporters RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next 'He's gone full Goldblum!' SNL...
    Wildfires, coronavirus and an earthquake collided for Californias terrible week Foods you can and cant keep after their expiration date 3 Moves That Will Slash Your Tax Bill This Year No matter how much money you make, your goal should be to pay the IRS as little tax as possible. And the smarter you are about taking advantage of tax breaks, the greater your chances of that happening. Here are a few key moves to make in the coming months that will leave you with a much lower tax bill for 2020. © Provided by The Motley Fool 3 Moves That Will Slash Your Tax Bill This Year 1. Max out your retirement plan If you're housing your retirement savings in a Roth IRA or 401(k), you won't get an immediate tax break for making contributions. But if you have your savings in a traditional retirement plan, whether an IRA or a 401(k), the more money you put in this year, the less tax you'll pay the IRS. © Getty Images Smiling man at laptop For 2020, IRA contributions...
    By Michael Hurley, CBS Boston BOSTON (CBS) — The NFL in 2020 is going to be very different. Perhaps you had heard? Among the many unique circumstances in the league during this COVID-19 pandemic is a rather peculiar setup in Philadelphia, where the Eagles have signed Josh McCown as a practice squad quarterback. The 41-year-old won’t be practicing with the Eagles though; instead he’ll be living in Texas, making $12,000 a week, basically being on call in case a slew of injuries and/or infections sweeps through the locker room. Really, though, with the NFL opening practice squad spots to players with unlimited NFL experience, McCown is essentially a video conference mentor for his younger QB brethren in Philly. On Tuesday morning, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick was asked if he’s considering doing something similar in Foxboro. He responded with a joke — or at least, we think it was a a joke. “Well I think we got Scott Zolak right around the corner if it really comes to that,” Belichick said of the former Patriots backup-turned-radio commentator. “So hopefully he’ll be ready to...
    Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, told "Your World" Wednesday that any supplemental unemployment insurance provided for in a new coronavirus stimulus bill should be "at a lesser level" than the $600 per week that became available as part of the CARES Act. "There's an extra $600 put in by the federal government on top of the state benefit," Portman told host Neil Cavuto. "Most people believe that that's creating a disincentive to work because you're paying roughly 68 percent of the people more on unemployment insurance than they can make at their work." SCHUMER SAYS $600 IN UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFIT NONNEGOTIABLE, AFTER HOYER SAYS IT IS "I think," Portman added, "we need to lower it to a number that gives people help during this tough time, because unemployment is still relatively high and because some businesses have not reopened because of COVID-19." Senate Republicans unveiled their version of a so-called "Phase 4" relief bill Monday, while White House negotiators and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., met Tuesday evening to begin negotiations. ADDITIONAL $600 IN JOBLESS BENEFITS ABOUT TO EXPIRE The $1 trillion Republican bill is the...
    Fox News host Tucker Carlson and Sen. Mike Braun, R-Ind., took part in a spirited debate on "Tucker Carlson Tonight" Monday over Braun's Reforming Qualified Immunity Act, which would limit the circumstances under which law enforcement officers could avoid civil lawsuits. Under the bill, which Braun introduced last week, officers could only claim immunity from legal action if the conduct in question had previously been authorized or required by federal or state law or regulation, or if a court had ruled the conduct was lawful and Constitutional. Braun argued Monday that unless Republican lawmakers work to change the system, "Democrats are going to spin it" to their benefit in the November elections. BRAUN KNOCKS SENATE DEMS OVER 'TERRIBLE THREAT' TO BLOCK GOP POLICE REFORM BILL "Chuck Schumer has already decided he can make hay of this in the election and we will end up on the short side of it again," Braun said. "Who controls the Senate?" Carlson fired back. "I thought Republicans controlled the Senate. So you're taking your cues from Chuck Schumer [and] saying, 'He might criticize me, therefore I have to pass a law that makes it easier to sue police'?" Braun...
    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio revealed a plan that would cut the city’s police budget by $1 billion. Weeks after the mayor declared his intention to redistribute funding from the New York City Police Department to other initiatives, he announced on Monday a plan that would slash a sixth of the department's $6 billion budget. “I’m excited to say we have a plan that can achieve real reform, that can achieve real redistribution, while at the same time ensure that we keep our city safe, while we make sure that our officers are on patrol around where we need them around this city,” de Blasio said during his daily press briefing. De Blasio would not guarantee that the police force would shrink from its current 36,000 officers. “We can do this. We can strike the balance. We can keep this city safe,” he added. The city's budget is due by June 30, leaving just Monday and Tuesday for the mayor and City Council to hash out spending cuts for the coming fiscal year. De Blasio said...
    VIDEO4:0504:05Jim Cramer on Chesapeake Energy filing for bankruptcySquawk on the Street Fracking giant Chesapeake Energy's bankruptcy filing comes following a financial mess at the company that included no budgets, a massive wine collection and a nine-figure bill for parking garages, sources told CNBC's David Faber. CEO Robert D. "Doug" Lawler found in examining the company's books a $110 million bill for two parking garages, Faber reported Monday. That was part of about $30 billion in spending above cash flow that happened from 2010-12, while the late Aubrey McLendon was CEO and prior to Lawler taking over in 2013. Other revelations include a wine collection in a cave hidden behind a broom closet in the Chesapeake office. Extravagances further included a season ticket package to the NBA's Oklahoma City Thunder that was the biggest in the league and a lavish campus that was modeled after Duke University, complete with bee keepers, botox treatments and chaplains for employees. The company announced its bankruptcy filing on Sunday, amid a brutal time for the energy sector. Prices have tumbled throughout the coronavirus pandemic as...
    Orion Pictures has chosen to delay Bill & Ted Face the Music by two weeks. The highly anticipated sequel was supposed to open in theaters August 14th, but the studio decided to push it after Christopher Nolan’s Tenet chose the August 12th release date earlier this week. Nolan and Warner Bros. want to be the ones responsible for getting viewers back into movie theaters this summer, but it’s beginning to look like that won’t be happening this year. Bill & Ted Face the Music will now open in theaters on August 28th. The sequel was originally set to hit theaters on August 21st, but the studio decided to take the 14th since Wonder Woman 1984 was pushed to the fall. Fans are starting to worry about seeing Bill and Ted on the big screen again, especially since theaters are still not open across the United States. As for whether or not the movie will really debut this summer, that is a mystery for the time being due to the world’s current state of affairs. RELATED: Excellent New Bill & Ted...
              House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing Friday that the Democrat-led police reform bill is “worthy of George Kirby’s name.” The bill, however, is named for George Floyd, who died one month ago while in the custody of the Minneapolis police. Pelosi said Floyd’s brother, Philonise, approached her before he testified in front of the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month. “He said to me, ‘Madam Speaker, do you think I can tell George’s daughter that his name will be always remembered because you’ll name the bill for him?’ And I said, ‘Well, I’ll recommend that to the Judiciary Committee and to the Congressional Black Caucus, who have shaped the bill, but I only will do that if you tell me that this legislation is worthy of George Kirby’s name,’” Pelosi explained. “He said it is.” Speaker Pelosi says the Democrat-led police reform bill has to be “worthy of George Kirby’s name.”
    Democrats this week proved they don’t want law enforcement reform — they just want to run on the issue this fall instead. That’s the clear bottom line of the Senate minority’s refusal to allow a vote, or even debate, on the GOP bill, shepherded by Sen. Tim Scott. “Our bill does something. Theirs does nothing,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sniffed. False: In fact, many provisions in Scott’s bill are the same as ones in the Democrats’ House bill. No, the Republican bill wouldn’t end “qualified immunity,” which can protect cops from being personally held liable for damages for violating someone’s rights. Scott said the issue is a “nonstarter” for his party — but the GOP might’ve come around in negotiations with the House, if Democrats hadn’t strangled the Senate bill in the cradle. see also Mitch McConnell slams total hypocrite Chuck Schumer for blocking police bill Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Friday slammed Minority Leader... The Republican bill instructed the attorney general to prohibit federal officers from using chokeholds and encouraged states to ban them (and rein...
    Senator Tim Scott (R-SC), who has been leading the Senate GOP’s police reform bill, responded to an accusation from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) that Republicans were “trying to get away with the murder” of George Floyd through the police reform legislation. “It was the most outrageous, sinful comment I’ve heard as a public official, period. I thought to myself that, how in the world does this woman sitting, standing in front of a $24,000 refrigerator, have the sense to jump into the bottomless pit of race politics,” Scott told radio host Guy Benson in an interview on Friday. “Why in the world would she want to do that? There’s only one answer, by the way. One answer: It’s because she’s lived so long in a state of privilege that she has forgotten that it is the Republican Party that voted more for the civil rights-era legislation than the Democrats,” continued the Republican senator. “It is because she has forgotten that it was President Trump, and the criminal justice reform done in 2018, that made up for the Democrats’ 1994...
    By SARA CLINE, Associated Press/Report For America SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Senate on Friday unanimously passed a bill that makes it easier to uphold discipline against police by lessening the power of arbitrators. The measure, which moves to the House, is one in a package of police reform measures before Oregon lawmakers during the special session that began this week. It passed the upper chamber following the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who was handcuffed and died last month after a white Minneapolis police officer held a knee to his neck. “This bill is a problem solving effort,” Sen. Lew Frederick, D-Portland, said on the Senate floor. “It is an effort to create trust, fairness and transparency in government. This bill goes hand in hand in the procedural justice movement in 21st century policing and restorative justice commitments that have been made to our constituents.” Currently, police unions can call upon an arbitrator to review discipline handed down to a police officer and overturn disciplinary decisions. Arbitrators have reversed high-profile officer dismissals in Oregon before. Senate...
    WASHINGTON — We saw how seriously congressional Democrats were taking police reform when Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., the second-ranking Democratic leader, dismissed legislation introduced by Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., as a “token, half-hearted approach.” For Durbin to question the seriousness and sincerity of Scott — a Black man who has personally experienced police discrimination — was disgraceful. Scott said of Durbin’s comment, “to call this a token process hurts my soul.” (Durbin later apologized to Scott.) Not to be outdone, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, described Scott’s bill as “trying to get away with murder, actually. The murder of George Floyd.” When asked if she would apologize, Pelosi said, “Absolutely, positively not” — though she claimed she had been referring not to Scott but to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. Sure, she was. What Democrats should be apologizing for was their shameful vote on the Senate floor Wednesday to kill Scott’s legislation — and with it any chance of passing police reform this year. Democrats knew exactly what they were doing. As Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, one of...
    When President Donald Trump was expressing his frustration over former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation in 2018, he famously remarked, “Where’s my Roy Cohn?” — a reference to his infamous far-right attorney who was an ally of Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s. Trump later found an attorney general who, unlike Jeff Sessions, turned out to be the loyalist he was hoping for: Bill Barr. Journalist Joan Walsh,  in an article this week for The Nation, argues that Trump found his Roy Cohn in Barr. But she said that now Barr is becoming “sloppier” as he becomes “more brazen.” “Barr’s decline into blatant but ineffectual lawlessness is proof that Trumpism is a degenerative disease,” she said. According to Walsh, Barr might have gone too far when he fired Geoffrey Berman from his position as a federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York. Although Berman is a conservative Republican who supported Trump in 2016, the Southern District has not shied away from Trump-related investigations. “Barr’s disastrous attempt at a Friday Night Massacre, firing Southern District of New York U.S. Attorney...
    Orion Pictures has officially announced that the cast of Bill & Ted Face the Music will take part in an awesome San Diego [email protected] panel. The studio is inviting everybody to join cast members Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter, Samara Weaving, Brigette Lundy-Paine, William Sadler, director Dean Parisot, alongside writers Ed Solomon and Chris Matheson in a lively panel moderated by writer/director and superfan Kevin Smith. San Diego [email protected] runs from July 23rd through the 26th. A date and time for the virtual panel has yet to be revealed. Kevin Smith said that he already saw Bill & Ted Face the Music earlier this week. He called it, “f***ing wonderful” before diving into what he really enjoyed about the movie, without spoiling anything. It was even confirmed that Bill and Ted 3 made Kevin Smith cry. So you know there’s some real heart and emotion packed into this long-awaited sequel. RELATED: Watching Bill & Ted Face The Music Left Kevin Smith in Tears: They Stuck The Landing From the sound of things, Ed Solomon and Chris Matheson were able to create...
    Republican senators on Tuesday introduced the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data (LAED) Act, a bill that if passed would require technology companies to allow law enforcement to access encrypted data in order to carry out their warrants. “Terrorists and criminals routinely use technology, whether smartphones, apps, or other means, to coordinate and communicate their daily activities,” Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said in a statement while introducing the legislation with his Republican colleagues, Sens. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and Tom Cotton of Arkansas. After claiming that there have been terrorism cases and other incidents involving “serious criminal activity” in which law enforcement was hindered by not being able to access encrypted information, Graham accused technology companies of not honoring court orders. “My position is clear: After law enforcement obtains the necessary court authorizations, they should be able to retrieve information to assist in their investigations,” Graham said in his statement. “Our legislation respects and protects the privacy rights of law-abiding Americans. It also puts the terrorists and criminals on notice that they will no longer be able to hide...
    Talking to CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta in a Coronavirus City Hall, Gates reported the fact that people today are continue to dying in the US today reveals that the nation is “not even close” to carrying out adequate to struggle the pandemic. “It can be possible to ramp up testing for a new pathogen incredibly, quite quickly,” he claimed. “In actuality a amount of nations did that incredibly effectively in this circumstance and the technology keeps having better there. The US in individual has not had the management messages or coordination that you would have anticipated.” Gates attributed the increase in figures to a deficiency of screening and contact tracing, as properly as a lack of mask carrying. He mentioned other nations around the world that experienced completed all those things proficiently had noticed figures fall.Coronavirus situations surge in several states“The array of behaviors in the US proper now, some individuals remaining quite conservative in what they do, and some persons disregarding the epidemic, is big,” Gates explained. “Some individuals just about experience like it really...
    (CNN)Microsoft founder Bill Gates said Thursday that the current coronavirus picture, both globally and in the US, is "more bleak" than he would have expected.Speaking to CNN's Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta in a Coronavirus Town Hall, Gates said the fact that people are still dying in the US today shows that the country is "not even close" to doing enough to fight the pandemic."It's possible to ramp up testing for a new pathogen very, very fast," he said. "In fact a number of countries did that extremely well in this case and the technology keeps getting better there. The US in particular hasn't had the leadership messages or coordination that you would have expected."Eight weeks ago, when Gates was last a guest on CNN's Town Hall, the death toll in America stood at 63,000 with more than one million cases recorded. Today, those figures have doubled -- there are at least 2.4 million confirmed cases of Covid-19 in the US, and more than 122,000 people have died, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Read MoreGates attributed the rise...
    Getty Senator Tim Scott. After South Carolina Senator Tim Scott’s JUSTICE Act failed to pass due to objections from Congressional Democrats, he delivered an impassioned speech in which he said a momentous opportunity had been lost. “My friends on the other side just said no,” he said. “Not no to the legislation … they just said no.” Scott, the lone Black Republican in the Senate, had already gone before the senate in hopes that his bill would pass, urging Democratic senators to rise above politics and support a piece of legislation which he said would have provided “resources for body cameras, for anti-lynching, for de-escalation training.” However, many Democrats said the bill did not go far enough and refused to support it; one Democrat, Rep. Dick Durbin, said the bill represented a “token, half-hearted” attempt at reform, which he later apologized for, Politico reported. The bill failed and was just four votes shy of passing even though some Democrats joined in support of the bill, USA Today reported. Trump signed an order in response to the calls for...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., took Democrats to task Thursday for blocking the Senate Republican police reform bill a day earlier, calling their treatment of Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., "appalling." "You know what Nancy Pelosi said yesterday, and doubled down [on], that Tim Scott and the Republicans were supporting murder," McCarthy said on "The Daily Briefing with Dana Perino." "She says this to Tim Scott, who didn't start working on this bill a month ago after the death of George Floyd. He's worked it his entire life. Tim Scott's legislative achievements [are] opportunity zones, criminal justice reform, funding of black colleges." SENATE REPUBLICANS' POLICE REFORM BILL FAILS ON TEST VOTE AMID DEM OPPOSITION Pelosi asserted in an interview Tuesday that Republicans are "trying to get away with murder, actually -- the murder of George Floyd" using the reform bill introduced by Scott. Scott himself ripped Democrats Wednesday after his bill failed to receive the 60 votes required to open debate, accusing them of punting on the issue until after the election and abusing what he described as their "monopoly" on black voters. McCarthy...
    Jaime Harrison, the South Carolina Democrat challenging Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamPolice reform in limbo after Senate setback Democrats block GOP police reform bill amid Senate stalemate McConnell, Senate confirm Trump's 200th judicial nominee MORE (R) this November, panned on Thursday the GOP’s police reform bill, which failed to pass the upper chamber a day earlier. In an interview with The Hill, Harrison noted that the legislation, spearheaded by South Carolina Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottPolice reform in limbo after Senate setback Trump says police reform can't sacrifice protections for law enforcement Pelosi refuses to apologize for accusing GOP of 'trying to get away with murder' with police reform bill MORE (R), falls short on a slate of issues, including banning chokeholds and ending qualified immunity, the rule that protects officers with personal liability over use of force.  “It doesn’t go far enough. You’ve got to ban chokeholds. You have to address the issue of qualified immunity. And I just don’t feel like they’re doing enough as it relates to those particular issues. You’ve got to address this issue...
    Bryan MenegusA minute ago•Filed to:privacyprivacyfacial recognitioned markeyaclucolor of changeSaveSen. Ed MarkeyPhoto: Zach Gibson (Getty Images) There’s a buffet of things to be scared shitless about these days, but for those who have sampled even a taste of big tech’s eagerness to build and sell facial recognition surveillance software to law enforcement, it’s uniquely rancid. Among the challenges in reining in this dangerous class of artificial intelligence—which marries the lack of oversight endemic to tech with the lack of accountability law enforcement enjoys—is that there aren’t really any law governing the use of these products to speak of. Even the most basic suggestions, like asking Amazon to submit its Rekognition suite to testing by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, have been ignored. With any luck, though, a bill announced today by four members of Congress could put us on the path toward a solution. The Facial Recognition and Biometric Technology Moratorium Act, at least from my reading of the bill’s text, delivers on its name: a full stop to use of this entire class of software at the...
    No federal agency or official would be permitted to “acquire, possess, access or use” biometric surveillance tech in the US under the proposed legislation, and nor could they use any information from third-party use of a facial recognition system. In addition, the bill would ban the use of federal funds to acquire that type of technology. The bill also seeks to push state and local law enforcement to no longer use facial recognition tech. It’d “withhold certain federal public safety grants from state and local governments that engage in biometric surveillance.” “No one should have to fear the government tracking and identifying their face wherever they go. No one should have to go through what the Williams family has gone through,” American Civil Liberties Union Senior Legislative Counsel Neema Singh Guliani said in a statement. “It’s past time Congress halted the use of face recognition and stopped federal money from being used to invest in invasive and discriminatory surveillance. This bill should immediately pass.” Meanwhile, Robert Williams, the man who was wrongfully arrested after the technology falsely marked him as...
    Thursday on “Fox & Friends,” Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) slammed his Democratic colleagues in the U.S. Senate for forcing his police reform legislation to stall out, arguing the lack of will was political as the November presidential election looms. “It’s — really, it’s closer to the trash can than it’s ever been,” he said. “Unfortunately, the Democrats really want to hold on to this issue. They believe they’re going to win in November, so they’d rather write their own reform bill without any input from the Republican Party. Think about this, Brian. In the House bill right now, they refused any Republican amendments. In our legislation, I offered five because they said they needed five. I offered 20 because they said 20. I offered them a manager’s amendment, which basically means we can rewrite the parts of the bill that you want to. They said no. They had no desire to actually solve this issue before the election.” Scott said such inaction meant there was “blood on Democrats’ hands,” adding many of the cities where chokeholds are a problem were...
    More than one million dead people received coronavirus stimulus checks this year, according to a report from a government watchdog agency. The payments to nearly 1.1 million people totaled $1.4 billion, the Government Accountability Office revealed Thursday. Treasury Department officials said that the late-March CARES Act mandated that they distribute the money as “rapidly as possible,” the report says. The revelation follows anecdotal reporters of dead people getting stimulus checks — and comes as Congress begins to consider a new coronavirus package that may include more direct payments. The CARES Act sought to blunt the economic devastation of the pandemic by sending checks up to $1,200 to taxpayers, with an extra $500 per dependent child. The bill also gave a federal boost of $600 per week to unemployment insurance pay. According to the GAO report, the Treasury Department and the IRS didn’t decide to cut off the dead until May when 72 percent of payments already were issued. “Treasury and IRS, in consultation with counsel, determined that a person is not entitled to receive a payment if he or she...
    PHOTO VIA OFFICE OF THE GOVERNORAfter warning of big budget vetoes because of the coronavirus pandemic, Gov. Ron DeSantis on Wednesday secured the fate of one major spending item: teacher pay increases.  The Republican governor signed into law a measure that sets the stage for spending $500 million to try to boost the minimum salaries of classroom teachers to at least $47,500 and to give raises to veteran teachers. The initiative was one of DeSantis’ top priorities during this year’s legislative session, which ended in March. But after the COVID-19 pandemic crippled the state’s economy, the governor warned that even some of his priorities could be vetoed. “It was quite a challenge to make sure that even though we fought for it, we would be able to do it,” DeSantis said at a news conference at Mater Academy Charter School in Hialeah Gardens. “I can report that while we have not made every decision about the budget, this (teacher pay funding) will be there 100 percent. We are going to make tough choices, but this is important.” DeSantis signed the...
              Ohio House Democrats introduced a bill Wednesday that seeks to implement more training for state law enforcement officers. In House Bill 706, whose primary sponsors are state Reps. Erica C. Crawley (D-Columbus) and Thomas West (D-Canton), would require police to undergo training in de-escalation techniques, mental health issues, implicit bias. This bill is part of four criminal justice reform bill the Ohio House Democrats plan to introduce. The other three bills, which have not been introduced yet, address arrest and citation quotas, reduce penalties for certain offenses, and require Ohio to publish misdemeanor data by race, ethnicity, age and gender. “Failing to act with concrete, systemic changes to our law enforcement agencies and criminal justice system is simply not an option right now,” West said. “As lawmakers, we have to step up and take matters into our own hands. Black Ohioans and other Ohioans of color have waited decades for change and reform. For them, Ohio’s promise has gone unfulfilled for far too long. The time to act is now.” If this bill...
    Greater accountability would come by requiring a “defined complaint system” that handles reports and alerts users to moderation actions within two weeks while providing an appeals process. Companies would have 24 hours to remove any content deemed illegal, although smaller outlets would have more leeway for responding to requests and user complaints. The bill would limit Section 230’s ability to to protect companies from actions by federal regulators and state attorneys general, and would have the Government Accountability Office examine the possibility of an FTC-run whistleblower program for online platforms. If all goes well, this would hold sites to task when they’re abusing the law or are clearly aware of users’ illegal activity. A site that thrives on user uploads of pirated material would have a more difficult time avoiding legal action. This wouldn’t weaken encryption (as the EARN IT Act and other initiatives might), however, and it wouldn’t force sites to carry content. There’s no certainty this bill and its expected House counterpart will survive Congress and become law. Schatz pointed out that this is not only a bipartisan...
    Sen. Tim Scott called out Democrats for blocking a Republican-authored police reform measure, arguing party lawmakers refused to debate the measure simply because it was written by the GOP in a presidential election year. Scott, who is black, delivered an impassioned floor speech denouncing Democrats for blocking the JUSTICE Act, which would have banned police chokeholds, expanded police body camera use, and required new reporting by law enforcement on the use of force. “They’ve decided to punt this bill until the election. You know why?" he said. “Because they believe the polls reflect a 15-point deficit on our side, therefore, they can get the vote they want in November. All they have to do is win the election, then roll in January and get the chance to write the police reform bill without our support at all.” Scott called out House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, for accusing the GOP in a CBS interview of “trying to get away with murder, actually — the murder of George Floyd." He called the comment “one of the most...
              Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Tennessee state Senator Kerry Roberts (R-Springfield). During the third hour, Roberts weighed in on the recent Fetal Heartbeat Bill surprisingly passed at midnight in the Tennessee General Assembly this week. Roberts discussed the issues with the constitutionality of the COVID-19 Liability bill which would hold businesses harmless should anyone contract the virus after a visit to their establishment. Leahy: We are joined by our good friend state Senator Kerry Roberts. Good morning Kerry. Roberts: Good morning. How are you this morning? Leahy: Well. Roberts: Well. Leahy: You have been busy. Roberts: Haha. Yeah, just a little bit. Leahy: So now the Fetal Heartbeat Bill, you’ve got to bring us in on this. Roberts: Sometimes you have pleasant surprises. Leahy: Let me just come back. Perhaps Kerry Roberts, perhaps this is the morning for you to take a victory lap...
    Microsoft founder Bill Gates speaks while participating in an event at the agency’s headquarters in Washington, USA. USA (Free Press Photo: EFE / Archive). Recently, some statements of his during a television interview on April 9 have been used on Facebook or Twitter to spread falsehoods such as that Gates “recognizes that thousands of people will die with the coronavirus vaccine”, or that the magnate “would consider a good 770,000 deaths from the vaccine resulted. “ These are erroneous statements, since Gates did not refer to the deaths caused by the vaccine during this interview with the American channel CNBC, but to the number of people (700,000 people) who according to his calculations could suffer some side effect if the entire world population were to vaccinated against COVID-19, when the antiviral exists. Gates refers to side effects, not deaths The statements that have been decontextualized occur when the journalist asks Gates about whether he believes there will be a vaccine before 18 months with the progress being made at that time (around minute 11 of the interview published...
    Sens. Cory Booker and Kamala Harris. Sen. Chuck Schumer—along with the co-authors of the Democrats' policing reform bill, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris—has rejected the Senate Republicans' efforts to put a toothless, sham policing reform bill on the floor, all but saying they will filibuster in a letter to Sen. Mitch McConnell Tuesday. "Across the country, people of all races are marching together to demand a comprehensive overhaul of our current system of policing and an end to the killing of Black Americans by police. To begin to meet those demands, the Senate must move forward with meaningful reform," they begin. "We will not meet this moment by holding a floor vote on the JUSTICE Act, nor can we simply amend this bill, which is so threadbare and lacking in substance that it does not even provide a proper baseline for negotiations," they continue. "This bill is not salvageable and we need bipartisan talks to get to a constructive starting point." It's hard to be constructive with Republicans who say crap like Schumer has said about a "chokehold" on the bill. A...
    Both chambers of the Georgia legislature have approved legislation adding hate crime statutes to the Georgia code and the measure now heads to the Governor’s desk for signature. House Bill 426 had a long path to passage, beginning back in 2019. The Senate, led by Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan, refused to take up the bill during the 2019 legislative session and the first half of the 2020 session.  It was not until the death of Ahmaud Arbery in Brunswick made headlines across the country that Duncan decided to give consideration to the legislation. The bill was revived last week when lawmakers returned to the Capitol after a three month COVID-induced hiatus and Duncan held a press conference seeking to overhaul the legislation all on his own. HB 426 briefly lost support from Democrats and anti-police activists late last week when a Senate committee added ‘law enforcement officers’ to the long list of protected classes under the provision. The language was removed Tuesday and added into its own bill Tuesday – HB 838, which creates a Peace Officers Bill of Rights....
          Gov. Bill Lee is thinking about calling the Legislature in for a special session to pass a bill to provide retroactive COVID-19 legal protection for businesses, the Chattanooga Times Free Press said. The General Assembly ended their session on Friday without the House passing the Tennessee Recovery and Safe Harbor Act. It received 46 of 50 votes needed. House Majority Leader William Lamberth (R-Portland) questioned whether the measure was legal under Tennessee’s Constitution regarding the impairment of contracts. (The Senate had approved the bill.) Lee’s spokeswoman Laine Arnold told the newspaper more information about a possible special session would be released this week. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally took issue with Lamberth’s opposition. He tweeted, “@WilliamLamberth, together with the bill’s sponsor, @StateRepCurcio, cobbled together a cabal of Democrats and attorneys to defeat the legislation and place our entire economy in danger. It was irresponsible and dangerous.” .@WilliamLamberth, together with the bill’s sponsor, @StateRepCurcio, cobbled together a cabal of Democrats and attorneys to defeat the legislation and place our entire economy in danger. It was irresponsible and dangerous. — Randy McNally (@ltgovmcnally)...
    Attorney General Bill Barr said on Sunday that the Justice Department’s investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation will likely yield ‘developments’ before the fall. Barr was asked about the progress of the probe being led by John Durham, the US Attorney from Connecticut. Durham is believed to be looking into whether top Justice Department officials broke the law by engaging in surveillance and other information-gathering techniques against Trump campaign officials in 2016 and early 2017.  The nation’s top prosecutor told Fox News that he was surprised by the lack of media interest in Durham’s investigation, particularly after a Justice Department watchdog revealed errors and omissions in the FISA application process that led to the surveillance of a Trump campaign official. ‘So that has been surprising to me, that people aren't concerned about civil liberties and the integrity of our governmental process in terms of the future of Durham's investigation,’ Barr said. Attorney General Bill Barr (above) said on Sunday that he expected a Justice Department investigation into the origins of the Russia probe to yield 'developments' before...
    In the following interview, veteran journalist Bill Moyers talks with Rev. James Forbes, a passionate advocate of celebrating Friday, June 19 as Juneteenth—the day in 1865 when the last of America’s slaves learned they were free. Because many states had refused to end slavery when President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation two and a half years earlier, it took that long before Union troops landed in Texas with news that the Civil War was over and the quarter-million slaves in Texas were slaves no more. Since then, descendants of those former slaves have celebrated Juneteenth as their Independence Day. For the last five years Rev. Dr. James Forbes—senior minister emeritus of the city’s historic Riverside Church—has organized an acclaimed Juneteenth celebration in New York City, twice now at Carnegie Hall, this year online. Listen: Moyers on Democracy · Bill Moyers talks with Rev. Dr. James Forbes About Juneteenth & America After George Floyd BILL MOYERS: Hi Jim. This is Bill Moyers. How are you? JAMES FORBES: I’m doing very well, thank you. BILL MOYERS: Good. Good to talk to you. I’ve...
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