Monday, Mar 08, 2021 - 11:14:27
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Tuesday in the Senate:

    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A controversial effort to further limit local governments’ ability to regulate and inspect vacation rental properties is advancing in the Florida Senate, as the proposal’s sponsor on Tuesday assured critics that the legislation is “a starting point.” As online platforms such as Airbnb have grown in popularity, regulation of short-term rental properties has become a perennial fight in the Legislature. RELATED: ‘For Those Gathered in the Wind’: Miami Artist T. Eliott Mansa’s Exhibition Honors Black Lives Lost Throughout American History State law already bans local governments from passing ordinances to outlaw vacation rentals, which have raised the ire of residents who complain of investor-owned, noisy “party houses” in neighborhoods. Other critics maintain that owners of some rental properties are failing to properly submit state and local taxes. But proponents contend that the short-term rental properties are used to supplement the incomes of retirees and families. They argue...
    (CNN)The first day of the Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was a perfect microcosm of the country's partisan divide and what's at stake in a post-Trump America. On one side are dedicated lawmakers trying to cobble a broken nation back together, taking their roles seriously and clearly acting with heavy hearts in the wake of a violent insurrection. On the other are those who believe these hearings are not in their party's interests, and are willing, again, to put party over country while they demand that a fractured democracy move on without tending to its wounds. Jill FilipovicThis is not a situation in which both sides are equal. One side, the Democratic House managers, made their case with a video all Americans should watch, which cast into sharp relief just how violent and blood-thirsty the Capitol insurrectionists were, and just how much they were encouraged by President Trump....
    In a solemn atmosphere and under high security, the US Senate on Tuesday opened the second historic trial of Donald Trump, accused of having incited his supporters “to insurgency” before the bloody attack on the Capitol. Now living in Florida, the billionaire will not go to trial. And there is little doubt that he will eventually be acquitted. In great silence, the elected Democrats charged with the accusation crossed to the Senate the same corridors of the Capitol, the seat of Congress, where pro-Trump demonstrators had rushed on January 6, sowing chaos and forcing the evacuation of parliamentarians. An unprecedented situation, the 100 senators who serve as jurors were thus the witnesses, and victims, of the attack. After a prayer, they took their places for this doubly historic trial. It is indeed the first time that a former American president is targeted by an impeachment procedure...
    This Tuesday begins the historic second political trial against Donald Trump, who is accused of “inciting insurrection” for the violent events in the assault on the Capitol on January 6 that left at least five dead and dozens of arrests . Miami World / AP The process against Trump is scheduled to begin this Tuesday at 1 p.m. ET in the federal Senate. That day, the then president gave a speech urging his supporters to march towards the headquarters of Congress, given their unfounded allegations that there was a fraud in the November presidential election, which Joe Biden won. Both houses of the legislature were meeting to endorse the victory of Biden, who were forced to suspend the session for several hours, until the Trump supporters were evicted by the security forces, and the legislators were able to ratify the victory of the democrat in The elections. Senators will...
    New York : Former President Donald Trump is seen on his arrival in West Palm Beach, this Friday, the same day as the inauguration of his successor Joe Biden. Photo: Giorgio Viera / EFE WASHINGTON – Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, announced this Friday that the president of the House of Representatives, also a Democrat Nancy pelosi, will send the article of impeachment to the former president to the Upper House on Monday Donald trump, with which the process will formally begin. Trump, the first president in US history to be subjected to two political trials, will be on this occasion under the charge of “inciting insurrection” for the violent assault on the Capitol on January 6 of a mob of his followers, and that left five dead. This means that Trump’s second impeachment trial could begin next Tuesday, the day after the delivery of...
                              Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Wednesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 351,590; Tuesday, 353,621; Wednesday, 357,385.   The United States has surpassed 21 million confirmed cases of COVID-19. For the first time in six years, the Senate is on the verge of changing hands, and perhaps reshaping the trajectory of national governance.   Democrats are on the precipice of pulling off two momentous victories in a pair of...
    Georgia's polls in the Senate runoff races closed at 7 p.m., as the results will determine which party controls the Senate as Democratic President-elect Joe Biden prepares to be sworn-in on January 20.  Voters who remain in line will be allowed to still cast a ballot, as Biden reminded supporters shortly before 7 p.m.  If the races are tight, which is expected, there will be a long wait to determine if Republicans maintain control of the upper chamber.  Around 1 p.m., President Donald Trump tweeted the inevitable claim that Dominion voting machines were malfunctioning, indicating he believes the Republican senators could come up short.   'Reports are coming out of the 12th Congressional District of Georgia that Dominion Machines are not working in certain Republican Strongholds for over an hour,' Trump posted to his Twitter Tuesday afternoon.  'Ballots are being left in lock boxes, hopefully they count them. Thank you Congressman...
    Voters in Georgia will head to the polls on Tuesday after two months of hard-fought campaigning for the closely watched Senate runoff elections. The outcome will decide which party holds the majority in the Senate, and so determine how effectively President-elect Joe Biden will be able to implement his legislative agenda. Republican incumbent Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler are facing well-funded Democratic opponents, Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock. Georgia was a critical state in the presidential election, and was narrowly won by Mr. Biden, a result that was affirmed again and again by an initial count and two additional recounts.  President Trump has zeroed in on the state in his fruitless effort to overturn the election results with baseless claims of fraud. In a phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger on Saturday, audio of which was obtained by CBS News, Mr. Trump attempted to pressure Raffesnperger to "find" more...
                                 Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Wednesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators, and readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 282,312; Tuesday, 283,743; Wednesday, 286,325. Topsy-turvy negotiations on Capitol Hill continued on Tuesday as lead negotiators and the Trump administration arm-wrestled over a coronavirus relief bill, with the hourglass winding down toward lawmakers’ holiday deadline.    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump taps Conway, Chao to government posts in waning days of administration...
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) arrives for the news conference following the weekly Senate Republican caucus policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington.Jonathan Ernst | Reuters Congress tried to scratch out an elusive coronavirus relief deal Tuesday as familiar roadblocks stood in the way of aid for Americans struggling to cover food and housing costs. Leaders in Washington hope to pass a rescue package before the end of the year after months of inaction. Failure to send more help before then could cut off unemployment benefits to about 12 million people and leave millions facing the threat of eviction. To strike a deal in time, Republicans and Democrats still need to resolve major disputes over liability protections for business, state and local government relief and direct payments to Americans. Lawmakers plan to buy themselves more time to reach both pandemic aid and spending agreements by approving...
    (CNN)Despite positive vaccine news, the coronavirus continues its relentless push across the US, forcing more states into shutdown mode. In their first joint interview since the election, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris kept the focus on preventing the spread of the virus by mask-wearing and social-distancing. Meanwhile, drama in the White House is still unfolding as President Trump refuses to concede the election, spooking Republicans in Georgia looking to maintain control of the US Senate. Monday Grassley returns to Senate office after testing positive for Covid-19 Arizona certifies Biden's victory Tuesday Biden readies major stimulus push and flurry of executive actions in first 100 days White House again flouts public health recommendations during holiday party season William Barr says there is no evidence of widespread fraud in presidential election Read More THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE! In each episode of his weekly YouTube show,...
                     Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Wednesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators, and readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 246,217; Tuesday, 247,220; Wednesday, 248,687.   The United States has exceeded 11.4 million confirmed cases of COVID-19, adding a million cases in just a week (ABC News). Democrats are again urging Republicans on Capitol Hill to return to the negotiating table to agree to a relief bill as the coronavirus rampages across the country and time...
    Welcome to The Hill’s Campaign Report, your daily rundown on all the latest news in the 2020 presidential, Senate and House races. Did someone forward this to you? Click here to subscribe. We’re Julia Manchester, Max Greenwood and Jonathan Easley. Here’s what we’re watching today on the campaign trail: PROGRAMMING NOTE: It’s been a pleasure for us to provide readers with the latest campaign news of the day during the 2020 cycle. However, we’re announcing that the newsletter will begin to wind down today, with future issues scheduled for this Thursday, November 12th and Friday, November 21st.  LEADING THE DAY: Election Night was a week ago and the transition process is in limbo as President TrumpDonald John TrumpPence to attend Senate GOP lunch on Tuesday Biden transition team to mull legal action over agency's transition delays: reports Trump campaign lawyers worry about pushing lawsuits that could undermine election: report MORE refuses...
    Senator Lindsay Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, faced the toughest challenge of her career on Tuesday, turning a Democrat backed by a record-breaking campaign money to win for the fourth time, the Associated Press reported. This fall promised victory to Republicans who were forced to divert tens of thousands of dollars from key battlefields to a deeply conservative position in order to save Mr Graham. It also shattered Democrats’ hopes that the victory of their candidate, Jaime Harrison, would improve their chances of capturing a Senate majority. Mr. Harrison, a black Democrat whose electoral campaign had electrified progressives across the country, would have been only the second African-American from the South elected in the Senate after the Reconstruction. Eventually, however, the chairman of the influential judicial committee, Mr. Graham leaned heavily on his status in Washington. A few days before the election, he helped deliver a unique Conservative victory,...
    Washington (CNN)Democratic and Republican lawmakers will have an opportunity on Tuesday to question President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during the second day of Senate hearings on her nomination, a highly anticipated moment that will mark the next stage in a contentious confirmation fight. Partisan battle lines were quickly drawn on Monday during the first day of hearings in the Senate Judiciary Committee as Democrats and Republicans offered up sharply divergent narratives of the high court fight to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In opening statements delivered on Monday, Republican senators praised Barrett's judicial qualifications in glowing terms and emphasized her capability as a working mom, while Democrats warned that health care protections and the Affordable Care Act are at stake, and under threat, in the nomination fight. Tuesday and Wednesday's hearing sessions in the committee will now allow for...
    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will begin meeting with senators on Tuesday, beginning with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham. Graham, a South Carolina Republican, announced he’ll receive a visit from Barrett at 5:30 p.m. in the Capitol. Graham plans to start Barrett’s confirmation hearing Oct. 12 and will hold a panel vote on Oct. 22 to advance her nomination to the Senate floor. President Trump announced Barrett’s nomination on Saturday to a cascade of praise from Republicans but near-universal opposition from Democrats. Republicans appear to have enough votes to confirm Barrett in the GOP-led Senate. Supreme Court nominees traditionally make the rounds to offices of both Republican and Democratic senators in the days before a confirmation hearing begins, but Barrett may not have many Democrats to call on. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Sunday he won’t meet with Barrett because he believes the upcoming election makes...
    Reuters August 5, 2020 0 Comments As coronavirus aid negotiations between top White House officials and Democratic leaders in the U.S. Congress bogged down over the past week, the question reverberating through near-empty Capitol hallways has been “Where’s Mitch?” That’s Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader with the reputation of being a legislative mastermind and a tough, wily deal-maker. McConnell, a Republican like President Donald Trump, said on Tuesday he is deliberately hanging back as Congress’s top Democrats and White House negotiators work out a deal to help American families stay afloat during severe economic times caused by the coronavirus pandemic. If they reach a deal, he said, it would be “something I’m prepared to support even if I have some problems with certain parts of it.” Unlike in past showdowns over spending and borrowing authority bills, McConnell would not bring a strong hand to negotiations – his party’s...
    By Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - As coronavirus aid negotiations between top White House officials and Democratic leaders in the U.S. Congress bogged down over the past week, the question reverberating through near-empty Capitol hallways has been "Where's Mitch?" That's Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader with the reputation of being a legislative mastermind and a tough, wily deal-maker. McConnell, a Republican like President Donald Trump, said on Tuesday he is deliberately hanging back as Congress's top Democrats and White House negotiators work out a deal to help American families stay afloat during severe economic times caused by the coronavirus pandemic. If they reach a deal, he said, it would be "something I'm prepared to support even if I have some problems with certain parts of it." Unlike in past showdowns over spending and borrowing authority bills, McConnell would not bring a strong hand to negotiations - his party's 53-member...
    Republicans fear that a Kobach primary win could lose control of the Senate for the GOP, as Democrats need to net just three seats for control if they win the White House, and four if Donald Trump wins reelection. Already, Republicans are underdogs in two GOP-held seats in Arizona and Colorado, and are in toss-up races in four more Republican-controlled seats, according to the political handicapping outlet Inside Elections. A Kobach victory could put yet another seat in play, possibly putting another seat into the Democratic column and losing control of the Senate for Republicans. "Kris Kobach is such a controversial figure that if he were to win the Republican Senate nomination, it would immediately make that race into a general election tossup," Stu Rothenberg, a veteran nonpartisan political handicapper, said in an interview. Rothenberg said the Kansas GOP has a pronounced rift between social conservative voters who support Kobach...
    Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers his concession speech after results are announced in the Alabama GOP primary runoff election, Tuesday, July 14, 2020, in Mobile, Ala. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett) MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Jeff Sessions took the stage with the same sense of conviction he had displayed in giddier times at a Mobile stadium almost five years ago, declaring once more that Donald Trump’s vision was right for America. Yet the political circumstances were far different Tuesday night for the longtime Alabama senator who was the president’s first attorney general. Read More: GOP spending $20M on alleged voter suppression for the 2020 election The boisterous throngs that had greeted Trump and Sessions at an August 2015 rally were a distant memory as Sessions conceded defeat in Alabama’s Republican Senate runoff. That vote ended Sessions’ hopes of reclaiming the Senate seat he abandoned to join Trump’s administration. Now,...
                             Presented by Argentum     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Wednesday and it’s TAX DAY! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the daily co-creators, so find us @asimendinger and @alweaver22 on Twitter and recommend the Morning Report to your friends. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 135,205. Tuesday, 135,615. Wednesday, 136,466. President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends recusal: 'I leave elected office with my integrity intact' Former White House physician Ronny Jackson wins Texas runoff MORE on Tuesday used a steamy Rose Garden event to assail former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign slams Trump's Rose Garden event as...
    By BILL BARROW and KIM CHANDLER, Associated Press MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Jeff Sessions took the stage Tuesday night near the Alabama gulf coast with the same certitude he’d displayed on another, bigger stage across town almost five years ago. Donald Trump’s vision, the former attorney general declared anew, is right for America. Yet this occasion couldn’t have been more different. Neither Trump nor the boisterous throngs they’d greeted together at an August 2015 stadium rally were anywhere to be seen as Sessions calmly conceded defeat in Alabama’s Republican Senate runoff. The outcome ended Sessions’ hopes of returning to the Senate seat he abandoned to join Trump’s administration, and instead left him to defend his honor one last time against the unlikely president he’d helped elect, but then angered. From the White House, Trump tweeted his joy over the stinging defeat of the former Justice Department chief he’s chastised since...
    Welcome to The Hill’s Campaign Report, your daily rundown on all the latest news in the 2020 presidential, Senate and House races. Did someone forward this to you? Click here to subscribe. We’re Julia Manchester, Max Greenwood and Jonathan Easley. Here’s what we’re watching today on the campaign trail. LEADING THE DAY: PRIMARY EVE IN TEXAS AND ALABAMA Runoff elections in Texas and Alabama on Tuesday are slated to resolve two races that have been left unsettled for months. In Alabama, the Republican Senate runoff is on between former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSessions hits back at Trump days ahead of Alabama Senate runoff Senate outlook slides for GOP Supreme Court blocks order that relaxed voting restrictions in Alabama MORE and former Auburn University coach Tommy Tuberville. While Sessions has not lost a race in his entire life, he is facing the biggest battle of his political life...
    (CNN)Last week's down-ballot primary action in Kentucky and New York still isn't settled, but it's time for three more states -- Colorado, Utah and Oklahoma -- to host primaries Tuesday, and there's at least one contest in each state that could help shape the balance of power in Congress next year. The Democratic Senate primary in Colorado has garnered the most national attention. Democrats need to flip three seats (if they win the White House) or four seats (if they don't) to control the Senate next year. Colorado, which voted for Hillary Clinton by 9 points in 2016, may be their biggest target. The national party has already settled on its candidate to take on GOP Sen. Cory Gardner, but on Tuesday, voters will have their say.Whereas Democrats are on offense in the Senate, they're mostly playing defense in the House, trying to hold onto their historic gains from the...
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