Sunday, Mar 07, 2021 - 18:23:48
130 results - (0.000 seconds)

Newsom signs:

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California’s public schools can tap into $6.6 billion of new state spending to return students to classrooms under a bill Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Friday that has attracted bipartisan support and scorn in equal measure. Newsom signed the bill via Zoom, mimicking how most of the state’s 6.1 million public school students have been learning for the past year. The irony was not lost on Newsom, who said the virtual ceremony was necessary to include other state officials who were scattered across the state. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: Are Relief Payments Bad For The Economy? Newsom signed the law as he faces a possible recall election later this year, fueled by anger over his handling of the pandemic. On Friday, Newsom said “now is the time to safely reopen,” highlighting the struggles he and lawmakers have had in negotiating a plan on the...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — California’s public schools can tap into $6.6 billion of new state spending to return students to classrooms under a bill Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Friday that has attracted bipartisan support and scorn in equal measure. Newsom signed the bill via Zoom, mimicking how most of the state’s 6.1 million public school students have been learning for the past year. The irony was not lost on Newsom, who said the virtual ceremony was necessary to include other state officials who were scattered across the state. READ MORE: Capitol Siege: Bay Area Rep. Zoe Lofgren Releases Massive Social Media Report On GOP Colleagues Who Voted To Overturn Election Newsom signed the law as he faces a possible recall election later this year, fueled by anger over his handling of the pandemic. On Friday, Newsom said “now is the time to safely reopen,” highlighting the struggles...
    By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's public schools can tap into $6.6 billion of new state spending to return students to classrooms under a bill Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Friday that has attracted bipartisan support and scorn in equal measure. Newsom signed the bill via Zoom, mimicking how most of the state's 6.1 million public school students have been learning for the past year. The irony was not lost on Newsom, who said the virtual ceremony was necessary to include other state officials who were scattered across the state. Newsom signed the law as he faces a possible recall election later this year, fueled by anger over his handling of the pandemic. On Friday, Newsom said “now is the time to safely reopen,” highlighting the struggles he and lawmakers have had in negotiating a plan on the best way to do that. “When you...
    Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation supporting the effort to get California kids back into the classroom.On Thursday, state lawmakers overwhelmingly passed the plan to push schools to reopen by offering them financial incentives.Newsom announced the deal earlier this week after months of negotiations. It provides $2 billion for school districts that return to at least some in-person instruction by March 31.RELATED: California Legislature OKs plan aimed at in-person learningThe bill has two sets of rules districts must follow to get the money. The first set applies to school districts in counties where the coronavirus is widespread. The second set of rules applies to districts in counties where the virus is not as widespread.To get the money, districts governed by the first set of rules must offer in-person learning through at least second grade by the end of March. Districts governed by the second set of rules must offer in-person learning...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order on Thursday that extends authorization for local governments to halt evictions for commercial renters impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through June 30. The order extends protections against price gouging for emergency supplies and medical supplies during the continuing coronavirus pandemic. READ MORE: Video Shows Street Vendor Harassed, Cart Kicked Over In South Sacramento You can read the full text of the executive order here.  READ MORE: 1 Arrested After Shooting In Elk Grove In January, California lawmakers agreed to use $2.6 billion in federal stimulus money to pay off up to 80% of some tenants’ unpaid rent — but only if landlords agree to forgive the rest of their debt. MORE NEWS: Second Nugget Market Opens In West Roseville The legislation, which Gov. Gavin Newsom helped negotiate, was the state’s first major attempt to clear unpaid rents that have...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order on Thursday that extends authorization for local governments to halt evictions for commercial renters impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through June 30. The order extends protections against price gouging for emergency supplies and medical supplies during the continuing coronavirus pandemic. FULL TEXT OF EXECUTIVE ORDER EXECUTIVE ORDER N-03-21 WHEREAS on March 4, 2020, I proclaimed a State of Emergency to exist in California as a result of the threat of COVID-19; and WHEREAS the Legislature has declared its intent to protect residents from price gouging during states of emergency, and has enacted statutes consistent with that purpose, including by strengthening existing statutory protections against price gouging through new legislation enacted during the State of Emergency proclaimed in response to COVID-19; and WHEREAS consistent with these statutory enactments and Legislative intent, the March 4, 2020 Proclamation of a State...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed several bills into law Tuesday to help people and businesses hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, including one that will distribute one-time payments of $600 to nearly 6 million Californians. “This $7.6 billion dollars of direct relief that we’re providing today not only supports small businesses, but supports, as the pro tem said, some 5.7 million Californians with direct stimulus check relief,” Newsom said at a news conference Tuesday. READ MORE: Tiger Woods Undergoing Surgery For Multiple Leg Injuries Suffered In Rollover Crash In Rancho Palos Verdes The stimulus package will include direct relief payments of at least $600 to people making less than $75,000, which represents a total of 5.7 million payments to low-income Californians. The payments will be sent to taxpayers within 45 to 60 days after they file their 2020 tax returns. Stimulus payments will also be sent to...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a $7.6 billion coronavirus relief package on Tuesday that will give at least $600 one-time payments to 5.7 million people while setting aside more than $2 billion in grants for struggling small businesses. Newsom signed the law as Congress is debating a much larger stimulus package for the nation, a proposal that could also put money into the pockets of most Americans. And it comes as the first-term governor is facing a recall effort fueled in part by widespread anger over his handling of the coronavirus, particularly its impact on businesses. "The backbone of our economy is small business. We recognize the stress, the strain that so many small business have been under," Newsom said at a bill-signing ceremony at Solomon's Deli in Sacramento. "And we recognize as well our responsibility to do more and to do better to help support these small businesses through...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a $7.6 billion coronavirus relief package on Tuesday that will give at least $600 one-time payments to 5.7 million people while setting aside more than $2 billion in grants for struggling small businesses. Newsom signed the law as Congress is debating a much larger stimulus package for the nation, a proposal that could also put money into the pockets of most Americans. And it comes as the first—term governor is facing a recall effort fueled in part by widespread anger over his handling of the coronavirus, particularly its impact on businesses. “The backbone of our economy is small business. We recognize the stress, the strain that so many small businesses have been under,” Newsom said at a bill-signing ceremony at Solomon’s Deli in Sacramento. “And we recognize as well our responsibility to do more and to do better to help support...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a $7.6 billion coronavirus relief package on Tuesday that will give at least $600 one-time payments to 5.7 million Californians while setting aside more than $2 billion in grants for struggling small businesses. Newsom signed the law as Congress is debating a much larger stimulus package for the nation, a proposal that could also put money into the pockets of most Americans. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Latest: Whats The Timeline For Another Economic Relief Payment? And it comes as the governor is facing a recall effort fueled in part by widespread anger over his handling of the coronavirus, particularly its impact on businesses. “The backbone of our economy is small business. We recognize the stress, the strain that so many small business have been under,” Newsom said at a bill-signing ceremony at Solomon’s Deli in Sacramento. “And we recognize as well our...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a $7.6 billion coronavirus relief package on Tuesday that will give at least $600 one-time payments to 5.7 million people while setting aside more than $2 billion in grants for struggling small businesses.Newsom signed the law as Congress is debating a much larger stimulus package for the nation, a proposal that could also put money into the pockets of most Americans. And it comes as the first-term governor is facing a recall effort fueled in part by widespread anger over his handling of the coronavirus, particularly its impact on businesses."The backbone of our economy is small business. We recognize the stress, the strain that so many small business have been under,'' Newsom said at a bill-signing ceremony at Solomon's Deli in Sacramento. "And we recognize as well our responsibility to do more and to do better to help support these small businesses...
    By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a $7.6 billion coronavirus relief package on Tuesday that will give at least $600 one-time payments to 5.7 million people while setting aside more than $2 billion in grants for struggling small businesses. Newsom signed the law as Congress is debating a much larger stimulus package for the nation, a proposal that could also put money into the pockets of most Americans. And it comes as the first—term governor is facing a recall effort fueled in part by widespread anger over his handling of the coronavirus, particularly its impact on businesses. “The backbone of our economy is small business. We recognize the stress, the strain that so many small business have been under,” Newsom said at a bill-signing ceremony at Solomon's Deli in Sacramento. “And we recognize as well our responsibility to do more and to...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Governor Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a state-sized coronavirus relief package aimed at helping lower-income people weather what they hope is the last legs of the pandemic. It clears the way for 5.7 million people to get at least $600 in one-time payments.The state Legislature passed the bill by a wide margin on Monday, moving faster than their counterparts in Congress who are also considering another round of stimulus checks for the nation.People who are eligible for the money should get it at between 45 days and 60 days after receiving their state tax refunds, according to the Franchise Tax Board.One of those people is Judy Jackson, a 75-year-old former teacher and cancer survivor who lives off of about $1,000 a month from other government programs. Jackson said she would use part of the money to pay off a freezer she bought so she could have food...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Governor Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a state-sized coronavirus relief package aimed at helping lower-income people weather what they hope is the last legs of the pandemic. It clears the way for 5.7 million people to get at least $600 in one-time payments.Watch his remarks live in the video player above.The state Legislature passed the bill by a wide margin on Monday, moving faster than their counterparts in Congress who are also considering another round of stimulus checks for the nation.People who are eligible for the money should get it at between 45 days and 60 days after receiving their state tax refunds, according to the Franchise Tax Board.One of those people is Judy Jackson, a 75-year-old former teacher and cancer survivor who lives off of about $1,000 a month from other government programs. Jackson said she would use part of the money to pay off a...
    Sacramento, California — California lawmakers on Monday cleared the way for 5.7 million people to get at least $600 in one-time payments, part of a state-sized coronavirus relief package aimed at helping those with low-to-moderate incomes weather the pandemic. Governor Gavin Newsom said he will sign the bill into law on Tuesday, one day after it passed the state Legislature by a wide margin.How to watch Newsom sign $600 stimulus check bill today What: California Governor Gavin Newsom signs $600 stimulus check bill Date: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 Time: 10 a.m. local time, 1 p.m. ET Online stream: Live on CBSN Los Angeles in the player above and on your mobile or streaming device  Fewer people will get these payments as compared to the federal relief checks Congress approved last year. But state lawmakers are aiming the money to reach the pockets of people who were...
    LOS ANGELES -- One of the largest vaccination sites in the country temporarily shut down Saturday because dozen of protesters blocked the entrance, stalling hundreds of motorists who had been waiting in line for hours, the Los Angeles Times reported.The Los Angeles Fire Department shut the entrance to the vaccination center at Dodger Stadium about 2 p.m. as a precaution, officials told the newspaper.The protesters had members of anti-vaccine and far-right groups, the Times reported. Some of them carried signs decrying the COVID-19 vaccine and shouting for people not to get the shots.There were no incidents of violence, the Times said."This is completely wrong," said German Jaquez, who drove from his home in La Verne and had been waiting for an hour for his vaccination when the stadium's gates were closed. He said some of the protesters were telling people in line that the coronavirus is not real and that...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF/AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two bills Friday, one extending a statewide moratorium on evictions for six more months; the other providing assistance to renters and some landlords. Last year, Newsom signed a law that banned evictions for unpaid rent for tenants who paid at least 25% of their rent owed after Sept. 1. That law was set to expire on Monday. But the law Newsom signed on Thursday extends those protections through June 30. During a live streamed event promoting the bills Friday, Newsom thanked all the legislators who worked on the bill and added perspective to the work facing state officials. Gov. Gavin Newsom announces extension for eviction moratorium. “I’m just here with gratitude. I’m humbled by the enormity of the task ahead of us and I’m not naive that ‘good enough’ ever is,” Newsom said. “We recognize we have to do more and we...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (CBS13/AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Friday that extends eviction protections through the end of June. Newsom signed a law in 2020 that banned evictions for unpaid rent for tenants who paid at least 25% of their rent owed after Sept. 1. That law was set to expire on Monday, but the law Newsom signed on Thursday extends those protections through June 30. Tenants who qualify for the protections will still owe their rent, they just can’t be evicted for not paying all of it. The law would use federal stimulus dollars to pay off 80% of some tenants’ unpaid rent, but only if landlords agree to forgive the remaining 20%. If landlords refuse the deal, the law would pay off 25% of tenants’ unpaid rent to make sure they qualify for eviction protections. People who earn more than 80% of the area median...
    SACRAMENTO —  Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed an emergency bill that will extend through June eviction protections for Californians suffering financial hardship because of the COVID-19 pandemic, acting just days before an earlier moratorium was set to expire. Newsom’s action on the legislation followed the measure’s approval Thursday by the state Legislature and was aimed at heading off what many state officials warned would be mass evictions and a surge in homelessness as Californians struggle with lost income during the pandemic. The measure prevents landlords from evicting tenants who pay at least 25% of their rent through June and attest that they face financial hardship because of COVID-19 and its impact on the economy. The bill also provides $2.6 billion in federal funds for rent subsidies that will help pay most past-due rent by low-income tenants dating back to last April. “The issue of evictions, the issue of this...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- Governor Gavin Newsom has signed a bill Friday providing rent relief for thousands of struggling Californians impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.It will also extend the state's eviction moratorium another six months. But some tenant rights advocates fear it could leave some renters out in the cold.Gov. Newsom says California will freeze evictions for struggling tenants impacted by COVID-19 for another five months. More than $2 billion in federal stimulus funds will help with rental assistance."We're going to leverage that $2.6 billion focusing on low-income renters," said Newsom.RELATED: New CDC director extends eviction moratorium due to COVID-19 until at least March 31The federal money can only be spent on households whose income is 80% or less of the area median income. It prioritizes relief for households at 50% or less of the median income and those unemployed for at least three months.Under the new bill, the state will...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) — Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday signed an executive order aimed at bolstering California’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts amid criticism the state has received about the vaccine rollout. The announcement about the executive order came a day after the state made a number of changes to the COVID-19 vaccine delivery system giving California more control in order to “expedite vaccine administration.” The executive order would assist in efforts to vaccinate as many Californians as possible as quickly as possible by maximizing the number of health care professionals and providers administering vaccines. “The order confirms that existing law – which protects certain health care professionals and providers from legal liability when they render services at the request of state or local officials during a state of emergency – protects those health care professionals and providers when they participate in the state’s vaccine administration program,” the announcement of the order...
    Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom is reportedly set to announce the end of a state-wide stay-at-home order that has been in place since early December. "Late this evening, senior officials in the Newsom administration informed us that the Governor will announce tomorrow that the stay-at-home order will be lifted in all regions of the state," a Sunday letter from the California Restaurant Association read. Newsom shuttered eateries, closed nonessential businesses, and mandated residents stay indoors in localities where intensive care unit capacity dipped below 15% strength, the New York Times reported. The restrictions, which were said to last for a minimum of three weeks, were extended in January for some regions, including Southern California, which had an ICU capacity of 0% in late December. "We see promising signs that California is slowly emerging from the most intense stage of this pandemic," a communications official for Newsom's office...
    Former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who has said he is seriously considering challenging California Gov. Gavin Newsom in next year’s election, told "Fox & Friends" on Monday that change was needed, pointing to "a growing frustration throughout California."   Faulconer has signed a petition for the governor’s recall. It states that Newsom "has failed Californians," citing unaffordable housing, record homelessness, rising crime, failing schools, exploding pension debt and a locked down population among other reasons as to why he "must go." According to a news release, the campaign to recall Newsom has garnered more than 911,000 signatures as of Monday, Dec. 28, "reaching the 60% milestone to remove the controversial leader." "It’s a new year. We need a new governor," Faulconer tweeted on Saturday. "Jobs are leaving, homelessness is skyrocketing, and the state can’t even issue unemployment checks to people struggling right now to get by." He then encouraged other Californians to join...
    San Diego —  San Diego’s former Republican Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced this weekend that he had signed a petition to recall Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom. Faulconer told the San Diego Union-Tribune last month that he is considering his own run for governor. He served seven years as San Diego’s mayor. Faulconer said on Facebook and Twitter around 10:30 a.m. Saturday that he signed the recall effort because jobs are leaving the state, homelessness has increased and the state unemployment office‘s difficulty in issuing checks during the COVID-19 crisis. Efforts to reach the governor’s office Saturday afternoon for comment were unsuccessful. “Every Californian fed up with the governor’s hypocrisy and failures should sign the recall petition,” Faulconer wrote. “Either through a recall or a regular election, it’s time to start holding the governor accountable.” Newsom gets mostly high marks for his handling of the economy over the past 12 months, despite...
    Former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer (R) has signed a recall petition aimed at California Governor Gavin Newsom (D), the latest sign that the campaign is gaining momentum — and that, if successful, Newsom could face a formidable opponent. The San Diego Union-Tribune reported Saturday: San Diego’s former Republican mayor Kevin Faulconer announced Saturday he had signed a petition to recall Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom. Faulconer told The San Diego Union-Tribune as recently as last month that he is considering his own run for governor. He served seven years as San Diego’s mayor. Faulconer also tweeted his support for the recall effort: It’s a new year. We need a new governor. Jobs are leaving, homelessness is skyrocketing, and the state can’t even issue unemployment checks to people struggling right now to get by. California is better than this. Join me in signing the recall petition.https://t.co/KZ5NB1ABDW — Kevin Faulconer (@Kevin_Faulconer) January 2, 2021 In...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California had a near-record number of daily coronavirus deaths as pandemic cases strained hospitals and reduced normal intensive care space to a record low, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday, yet there were faint hints that residents may be heeding medical officials’ increasingly desperate calls for caution during the holidays. The transmission rate — the number of people that one infected person will in turn infect — also has been slowing for nearly two weeks. The rate of positive cases reached a new high of 12.3% over a two-week period but was starting to trend down over the last seven days from a peak of 13.3% to 12.6%. The number of new positive cases dropped to a relatively modest 39,069, given that California has been averaging nearly 44,000 newly confirmed cases a day. “We are experiencing a modest decline in the rate of the growth,” Newsom said....
    By DON THOMPSON, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California had a near record number of daily coronavirus deaths as pandemic cases strained hospitals and reduced normal intensive care space to a record low, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday, yet there was a faint hint that residents may be heeding medical officials’ increasingly desperate calls for caution during the holidays. The transmission rate — the number of people that one infected person will in turn infect — also has been slowing for nearly two weeks. The rate of positive cases reached a new high of 12.3% over a two-week period, but was starting to trend down over the last seven days from a peak of 13.3% to 12.6%. The number of new positive cases dropped to a relatively modest 39,069, given that California has been averaging nearly 44,000 newly confirmed cases a day. “We are experiencing a modest decline in...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — California small businesses will have more time to file their tax returns in 2021. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Monday giving small businesses until the end of July to file their first-quarter tax returns. More broadly, the order gives a 90-day extension on returns and payments for all businesses with returns of less than $1 million. It comes as California prepares to enter 2021 still in the throes of the coronavirus pandemic, which has led Newsom to implement restrictions that have shuttered businesses. In most of the state, restaurants are closed for indoor dining, hair and nail salons can’t operate and stores can only allow in a fraction of customers. At minimum, it will be weeks before businesses can reopen. The tax extension was one piece of Newsom’s pandemic-related order. He also extended occupancy laws for farmworkers and their families in housing centers and dropped...
    Justine Bateman is getting political. The "Family Ties" alum, 54, has joined a number of people that believe that California Gov. Gavin Newsom should be recalled. Calls for the change in leadership have risen following the state's latest round of coronavirus-prompted restrictions, which includes a stay-at-home order issued after intensive care units fell below 15% capacity. In images obtained by the Daily Mail, Bateman could be seen at a "Recall Gavin 2020" campaign trailer on Saturday signing a petition in agreeance with the movement to remove the politician from office. JUSTINE BATEMAN SHARES BACKSTAGE ANTICS ON 'FAMILY TIES' "OK, how do we get rid of this guy? Where do I sign?" she reportedly asked at the trailer before taking a "to go" packet so that she can collect signatures to assist with the campaign. Justine Bateman was seen signing a petition to recall Calif. gov. Gavin Newsom. (Photo by Desiree Navarro/Getty...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom signed three bills into law Thursday to protect child actors from abuse and harassment while in the workplace. Assembly Bill 3175 requires now “that the parent or legal guardian ensure that sexual harassment training, as made available online by the department, be completed by the age-eligible minor, as defined, accompanied by their parent or legal guardian,” according to Deadline in a piece published Thursday. (RELATED: Gov. Gavin Newsom Declares State Of Emergency As Wildfires Char California, Gives Evacuation Orders) California Gov. Gavin Newsom Signs Bills To Protect Child Actors From Sexual Harassment & Abuse https://t.co/ODfoKTw0xJ — Deadline Hollywood (@DEADLINE) October 1, 2020 Assembly Bill 1963 requires the addition of “a human resource employee of a business with 5 or more employees that employs minors to the list of individuals who are mandated reporters.”  The passage of the bill also adds,  for purposes of reporting sexual...
    Loading the player... In a move that is being lauded as the first of its kind, California Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law requiring all publicly traded corporations headquartered in the state to make diversity a priority by appointing directors from underrepresented communities to their boards. READ MORE: Florida teacher forced to quit after parent complains about BLM flag According to USA Today, this is the first law in the nation that’s mandated the racial make-up of corporate boards. It was reportedly inspired by a gender-focused piece of legislation from 2018 that required publicly-held corporations headquartered in California to diversify their all-male boards. “When we talk about racial justice, we talk about power and needing to have seats at the table,” Newsom said Wednesday during a press conference. Not surprisingly, in 2018, when the state mandated that company boards could no longer be a ‘boy’s club’...
    California lawmakers are looking to protect one of the state’s most valuable workforces with a new COVID-19 relief package. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a farmworker relief package this week, which promises farmworkers stricter enforcement of health guidelines, paid sick leave for COVID-19, and prioritizes farmworkers for both PPE and testing, among other things. The package, penned by state Assembly members Robert Rivas, D-Hollister, Eduardo Garcia, D-Coachella, and Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, is the nation’s first legislative package centered on COVID-19 protections for agricultural workers. Included in the package were several initiatives undertaken by Newsom at the urging of lawmakers, such as the Housing for the Harvest program, an emergency housing program modeled after one created by the Grower-Shipper Association to provide housing to farmworkers exposed to or diagnosed with COVID-19. Legislators from both sides of the aisle voted for the bill package, which was passed in August. Rivas, recently...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom (D) signed a law Wednesday requiring new guns to be outfitted with technology that has proven unworkable wherever it has been tried. Gun Owners of California reports Newsom signed AB 2847, which “forces manufacturers to use microstamping technology in order to have new handguns on the approved [California DOJ] roster.” The CA DOJ maintains a roster of new guns approved for sale in the state of California. Beginning July 1, 2022, only new guns with microstamping technology will be added to the list. Moreover, each time a gun with microstamping technology is added to the roster three guns without such technology will be removed. Microstamping technology has proven unworkable everywhere it has been tried, as it is easily thwarted by criminals who understand how it works. For example, on November 8, 2015, Breitbart News reported Maryland ended a ballistic fingerprinting program after spending 15 years and $5...
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday signed a number of police reform bills that ban chokeholds and allow the Justice Department (DOJ) to probe police shootings, among other things, before the end of the 2020 legislative season. Democrats in the state have been pushing for police reform since George Floyd, a Black Minneapolis man, died in police custody in May after a White police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes, as seen in moments captured on video, sparking outrage and protests across the nation. "CA just became the first state in the nation to mandate the study and development of proposals for reparations," Newsom, a Democrat, wrote in a Wednesday tweet. "Our past is one of slavery, racism and injustice. Our systems were built to oppress people of color. It’s past time we acknowledge that." Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to reporters at his Capitol office in Sacramento, Calif. Newsom signed into...
    Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law establishing a task force to study how slavery reparations could be distributed, making it the first state to make the move toward potentially compensating black residents, numerous sources reported Wednesday. The nine-person task force will study how reparations could be awarded and who would be eligible, giving “special consideration for African Americans who are descendants of persons enslaved in the United States,” the law says.  CA just became the first state in the nation to mandate the study and development of proposals for reparations. Our past is one of slavery, racism, and injustice. Our systems were built to oppress people of color. It’s past time we acknowledge that. https://t.co/sY8UWffqzt — Gavin Newsom (@GavinNewsom) September 30, 2020 The legislation was authored by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a Democrat representing San Diego, who is chair of California’s Legislative Black Caucus.  “Hundreds of years of...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California will develop a detailed plan for reparations under a new law signed on Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom, making it the first state to mandate a study of how it can make amends for its role in the oppression of Black people.The law creates a nine-member task force to come up with proposals for how the state could provide reparations to Black Americans, what form those reparations might take and who would be eligible to receive them."This is not just about California, this is about making an impact, and a dent, across the rest of the country," Newsom said moments after signing the bill during a ceremony broadcast on his YouTube channel.MORE: California studying reparations for African AmericansThe law does not limit reparations to slavery, although it requires the task force to give special consideration for Black people who are descendants of slaves.California never had a...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Hundreds of California-based corporations must have directors from racial or sexual minorities on their boards under a first-in-the-nation bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The diversity legislation is similar to a 2018 measure that required boardrooms to have at least one female director by 2019. Like that measure, it could face court challenges from conservative groups who view it as a discriminatory quota. Supporters evoked both the coronavirus pandemic that is disproportionately affecting minorities and weeks of unrest and calls for inclusion that followed the slaying of George Floyd in May in the custody of Minneapolis police. After Floyd’s death, many corporations issued statements of support for diversity, but many haven’t followed through, said Assemblyman Chris Holden (D-Pasadena), who co-authored the bill. “The new law represents a big step forward for racial equity,” Holden said. “While some corporations were already leading the way to combat...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Hundreds of California-based corporations must have directors from racial or sexual minorities on their boards under a first-in-the-nation bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The diversity legislation is similar to a 2018 measure that required boardrooms to have at least one female director by 2019. Like that measure, it could face court challenges from conservative groups who view it as a discriminatory quota. Supporters evoked both the coronavirus pandemic that is disproportionately affecting minorities and weeks of unrest and calls for inclusion that followed the slaying of George Floyd in May in the custody of Minneapolis police. After Floyd’s death, many corporations issued statements of support for diversity, but many haven’t followed through, said Assemblyman Chris Holden (D-Pasadena), who co-authored the bill. “The new law represents a big step forward for racial equity,” Holden said. “While some corporations were already leading the way to combat...
    While the results fell far short of what activists had hoped for in the midst of a nationwide movement to rein in police power, California lawmakers touted their steps in that direction Wednesday as Gov. Gavin Newsom signed bills meant to overhaul law enforcement in the state. One of the new laws bans officers from using the carotid “sleeper” restraint, a neck hold that can turn deadly when it is applied improperly. Newsom had earlier this summer directed the state’s law enforcement standards commission to stop offering training on the tactic, and many departments had already banned it. Another law requires California’s attorney general, rather than local authorities, to conduct the investigations into certain deadly police shootings, in a bid to improve public trust of those investigations. And a third bolsters the authority of civilian panels overseeing county sheriff’s departments. Still, the ambitions of civil liberties groups and police reform...
    By DON THOMPSON and ROBERT JABLON, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Hundreds of California-based corporations must have directors from racial or sexual minorities on their boards under a first-in-the-nation bill signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The diversity legislation is similar to a 2018 measure that required boardrooms to have at least one female director by 2019. Like that measure, it could face court challenges from conservative groups who view it as a discriminatory quota. Supporters evoked both the coronavirus pandemic that is disproportionately affecting minorities and weeks of unrest and calls for inclusion that followed the slaying of George Floyd in May in the custody of Minneapolis police. After Floyd's death, many corporations issued statements of support for diversity, but many haven't followed through, said Assemblyman Chris Holden (D-Pasadena), who co-authored the bill. “The new law represents a big step forward for racial equity,” Holden said. “While some...
    SACRAMENTO —  Many California corporations will have to increase the diversity of their boards of directors under a new law signed Wednesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom to address a shortage of people of color in executive positions. The law requires some 625 publicly held corporations headquartered in California to include at least one person from an underrepresented community by the end of next year, with additional appointments required in future years. Newsom said during an online signing ceremony that the law is necessary to promote diversity in corporate boardrooms as part of a broader effort to improve racial equity in the U.S. “When we talk about racial justice, we talk about empowerment, we talk about power, we need to talk about seats at the table,” Newsom said. The new law is likely to be challenged in court by conservative groups including Judicial Watch, which sued to contest a 2018 law...
    SACRAMENTO —  New pistol models sold in California will eventually have to include micro-stamping technology that will make them easier to trace by law enforcement if they are used in crimes, under legislation signed Tuesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. The measure is the latest flashpoint in a years-long battle between the governor and the National Rifle Assn. that included a clash over Proposition 63, a 2016 initiative by then-Lt. Gov. Newsom, which regulated guns and ammunition. The NRA has sued the state half a dozen times to challenge gun laws supported by Newsom, including that initiative. The new law, which takes effect July 1, 2022, also requires the handguns to be equipped with safety measures including chamber load indicators and magazine disconnect mechanisms. “This is a bill that will assist law enforcement in solving gun-related crimes via using micro-stamping technology and reduce the number of accidental gun deaths and injuries,”...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif -- Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a bill widely restricting the use of certain highly potent rat poisons that are blamed for killing mountain lions, birds and endangered wildlife.Assembly Bill 1788 bars the general use of so-called second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides, or SGARs, until the director of the state Department of Pesticide Regulation certifies that the chemicals have been reevaluated and any additional restrictions needed to limit the impact on wildlife are adopted.No deadline was given.The highly potent SGARs work by preventing clotting and causing rodents such as mice, rats, squirrels and gophers to die from internal bleeding.The deaths can be slow, and the chemicals linger in the bodies of the rodents and can be passed on up the food chain to predators and scavengers from the dead or dying rodents.They include mountain lions, bobcats, badgers, golden eagles, great-horned owls, black bears, Pacific fishers, coyotes and endangered San...
    Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-CA) has signed a bill into law that allows individuals to pick their “gender identity” before their incarceration in a men’s or women’s prison. The law allows biological men who want to live as women to be housed with women prisoners and the same applies for women who want to live as men. Fox News reported on how the law would be implemented:  The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation houses men and women in separate facilities, and transgender inmates often are housed based on their biological sex. Advocates have argued that this is dangerous, particularly for transgender women housed in male facilities. The law says officers must ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary, or intersex. Those inmates can then request placement in a facility that houses either men or women. The report further noted that under the law, the “California...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – California Gov. Gavin Newsom Tuesday signed a law banning certain toxic rat poisons, a move which environmental advocates hope will protect mountain lion populations living in the Santa Monica Mountains. Assembly Bill 1788, the California Ecosystems Protection Act, was passed by the California Legislature Aug. 31 and signed into law this week, according to the Orange County Register. It bans the use of what are known as “second generation anticoagulant rodenticides.” According to the Center of Biological Diversity, the bill will put a moratorium on the use only the most toxic rat poisons until state agencies can implement protections to better protect wildlife from them. Less toxic rat poisons will still be allowed. Rat poisons have been suspected in several mountain lion deaths in the Santa Monica Mountains over the past few years. P-47, a mountain lion who lived in the Santa Monica Mountains. He was...
    California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomGOP online donor platform offering supporters 'Notorious A.C.B.' shirts Newsom signs law allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prison by their gender identity OVERNIGHT ENERGY: California seeks to sell only electric cars by 2035 | EPA threatens to close New York City office after Trump threats to 'anarchist' cities | House energy package sparks criticism from left and right MORE (D) on Monday signed into law legislation that makes it illegal for first responders to take unauthorized pictures of people killed at the scene of an accident or crime, the Associated Press reported.  The measure was first proposed in May following the January helicopter crash that killed Kobe Bryant and eight other people. After the accident, local deputies were accused of taking and sharing graphic photos of the victims from the crash site.  Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva said at the time that he...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Gov. Gavin Newsom Monday signed a bill introduced following the death of Lakers legend Kobe Bryant in a helicopter crash. (2/2) Thank you to @GavinNewsom for signing #AB2655 today, @AsmMikeGipson for authoring, and @JonesSawyerAD59 for supporting in committee. — Alex Villanueva (@LACoSheriff) September 29, 2020 AB 2655 makes it a misdemeanor for first responders to take and share accident and crime scene photos for any purpose other than an official law enforcement purpose or a genuine public interest. Assemblyman Mike Gipson, D-Carson, pushed for the legislation following reports that several deputies with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department shared graphic photos of the helicopter crash that killed the basketball star, his daughter and seven others. Proud to report that my bill, The #KobeBryant Act of 2020, was signed today by @GavinNewsom. #AB2655 will prohibit first responders from taking photos of the deceased outside of job...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — Tenants, affordable housing groups and local governments will get first crack at buying foreclosed homes under a measure approved Monday by Gov. Gavin Newsom. Senate Bill 1079 by State Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) is designed to keep corporations from snapping up homes and letting some fall into disrepair as they did during the Great Recession. The issue drew national attention a year ago when several homeless mothers calling themselves Moms 4 Housing moved into a vacant, corporate-owned house in West Oakland. Moms 4 Housing protest (CBS) It was among 15 bills Newsom signed into law as renters and home-buyers again struggle during mass layoffs prompted by the pandemic. The governor said the measures “will directly lead to more affordable opportunities for renters and homeowners.” The law bars sellers of foreclosed homes from bundling them at auction for sale to a single buyer. In addition, it...
    By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California is showing signs of a new surge of coronavirus cases, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday, warning of a potential third shutdown of businesses and more delays in school reopenings “if we're not vigilant.” Coronavirus-related hospitalizations have fallen more than 20% in the past two weeks and just 2.8% of people tested each day in California were positive for the disease, the lowest rate since the pandemic began. The improving numbers have prompted state officials to loosen restrictions in 13 more counties over the last few weeks, allowing more businesses to reopen while granting hundreds of waivers for elementary schools — mostly private — to resume in-person classes. But the “reproduction number," a measure of how quickly the virus is spreading, is creeping up in the state's most populated areas. An “R number" greater than 1.0 indicates an infected person is...
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed legislation (AB 2218) Saturday that establishes a “Transgender Wellness and Equity Fund” that may be used for transgender medical interventions and surgeries, many of which are known to cause sterility. “California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” said Newsom about AB 2218 and other LGBTQ measures such as SB 132, which allows biological male inmates who claim to be women to be housed in women’s prisons. He went on: These new laws will help us better understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ+ community, establish a new fund to support our transgender sisters and brothers and advance inclusive and culturally competent efforts that uphold the dignity of all Californians, regardless of who you are or who you love. Women’s Liberation Front (WoLF) expressed...
    Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation Saturday mandating that transgender inmates be housed in prisons based on the gender with which they identify. SB 132 requires the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to “house transgender, gender-nonconforming and intersex (TGI) individuals in a manner that matches their gender identity while supporting health and safety,” according to a press release from Newsom’s office. “California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” the governor said in a statement. “These new laws will help us better understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ+ community, establish a new fund to support our transgender sisters and brothers and advance inclusive and culturally competent efforts that uphold the dignity of all Californians, regardless of who you are or who you love.” SB 132 was...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Friday that for the first time in California defines "medical necessity," a move aimed at requiring private health insurance plans to pay for more mental health and drug addiction treatments.State and federal laws already require health insurance companies to handle mental health treatments the same as physical health treatments. The California Health Benefits Review Program says 99.8% of people enrolled in private health insurance plans have coverage for mental health and substance abuse disorders on par with other medical conditions.But those laws don't define what is "medically necessary" to determine which treatments get covered. Because of that, advocates say private insurers often deny coverage for some mental health and drug abuse treatments based on their own restrictive definitions.EMBED More News Videos On Thursday, ABC7's Denise Dador got tips from Psychiatrist Dr. Luis Sandoval, Psychologist Dr. Cheryl Grills, and "MomAngeles" blogger...
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed a new law on Saturday allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prisons based on their gender identity. Previously, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation housed men and women in separate correctional facilities, and transgender inmates were housed based on their biological sex. The new California law will allow transgender inmates to be housed based on their gender identity rather than their sex assigned at birth. The Transgender Respect, Agency, and Dignity Act notes that officers must privately ask inmates during the intake process on how they identify as. Transgender, nonbinary, or intersex inmates can request to be placed in a facility that houses either men or women based on how they identify as. The law says the CDCR cannot deny requests for the preferred prison based solely on the inmates' anatomy, sexual orientation, or "a factor present" among other inmates...
    A new law signed by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Saturday requires the state to house transgender inmates in prisons based on their gender identity. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation houses men and women in separate facilities, and transgender inmates often are housed based on their biological sex. Advocates have argued that this is dangerous, particularly for transgender women housed in male facilities. Gov. Gavin Newsom holds a face mask as he urges people to wear them to fight the spread of the coronavirus during a news conference in Rancho Cordova, Calif.  (AP) The law says officers must ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex. Those inmates can then request placement in a facility that houses either men or women. The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation cannot deny requests solely because of inmates' anatomy, sexual orientation or...
    Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law a bill allowing California transgender inmates to be placed in prisons that align with their gender identity. “California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” Newsom said Saturday. California corrections officers will now be required to privately ask inmates if they identify as transgender, nonbinary, or intersex. The inmates can then request to be placed in prisons that correspond with their gender identity if there are no “management or security concerns” with a particular inmate. Newsom signed other laws on Saturday requiring local public health officials to more thoroughly track diseases affecting the gay and lesbian community, as well as a bill banning insurance companies from denying coverage based on HIV status. “These new laws will help us better understand the...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a law on Saturday requiring the state to house transgender inmates in prisons based on their gender identity -- but only if the state does not have "management or security concerns.''The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation houses men and women in separate facilities.Transgender inmates are often housed based on their sex assigned at birth.Advocates say this is dangerous, particularly for transgender women housed in facilities for men.RELATED: Mayor London Breed spoke at Black Trans Lives rally at San Francisco City HallThe law Newsom signed Saturday says officers must ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex.Those inmates can then request to be placed in a facility that houses either men or women.The law says the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation cannot deny those requests solely because of inmates' anatomy, sexual orientation or a...
    California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomOVERNIGHT ENERGY: California seeks to sell only electric cars by 2035 | EPA threatens to close New York City office after Trump threats to 'anarchist' cities | House energy package sparks criticism from left and right California seeks to sell only electric cars by 2035 EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters MORE (D) signed a bill Saturday allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prisons based on their gender identity.  The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will now house inmates based on their gender identity rather than their sex assigned at birth — but only if the state does not have “management or security concerns” with individual inmates.  The law Newsom signed Saturday requires officers to ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex, then inmates can request to be placed in a facility...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — California on Friday created what supporters call its own nation-leading, state-level version of the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau after critics said the Trump administration significantly weakened national protections. Assembly Bill 1864, the legislation that Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law, changes the existing Department of Business Oversight into the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation in what proponents said is the first such move by any state. The current department regulates a significant part of the financial services industry, including banks and credit unions. But the expanded version will add oversight authority over debt collectors, debt settlement, credit repair and check cashing services, consumer credit reporting, retail sales financing and rent-to-own contracts. “We need the state to lead as the federal government is pulling away from financial protection,” Newsom said. Proponents said the change will boost consumer protections by expanding the department’s ability to...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Friday that for the first time in California defines “medical necessity,” a move aimed at requiring private health insurance plans to pay for more mental health and drug addiction treatments. State and federal laws already require health insurance companies to handle mental health treatments the same as physical health treatments. The California Health Benefits Review Program says 99.8% of people enrolled in private health insurance plans have coverage for mental health and substance abuse disorders on par with other medical conditions. But those laws don’t define what is “medically necessary” to determine which treatments get covered. Because of that, advocates say private insurers often deny coverage for some mental health and drug abuse treatments based on their own restrictive definitions. The law requires all private insurers to cover medically necessary mental health and drug addiction treatments. The law says when...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law on Friday that for the first time in California defines “medical necessity,” a move aimed at requiring private health insurance plans to pay for more mental health and drug addiction treatments. State and federal laws already require health insurance companies to handle mental health treatments the same as physical health treatments. The California Health Benefits Review Program says 99.8% of people enrolled in private health insurance plans have coverage for mental health and substance abuse disorders on par with other medical conditions. But those laws don’t define what is “medically necessary” to determine which treatments get covered. Because of that, advocates say private insurers often deny coverage for some mental health and drug abuse treatments based on their own restrictive definitions. The law requires all private insurers to cover medically necessary mental health and drug addiction treatments. The law says...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS SF) — Local public health officials will now be included in the groups eligible for California’s confidential address program because of the threats and harassment they have faced while working to protect the public during the coronavirus pandemic. The Safe at Home program provides a substitute mailing address and other confidentiality services for victims and survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, human trafficking, elder/dependent adult abuse, as well as reproductive health care workers. Public health officials have often faced the wrath of those who have been impacted by stay-at-home orders and measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, with some officials being stalked and threatened. Last month, a community college instructor with ties to the far-right, anti-government “Boogaloo” movement was arrested for allegedly sending more than two dozen threatening letters to Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody. Dr. Cody has been one of the nation’s most...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Employers will now have to alert their employees of an outbreak of COVID-19 within 48 hours of finding out about it, after California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two new laws protecting workers from being exposed to the virus. Newsom signed AB 685, which requires workers be informed of COVID-19 exposure, into law Thursday. The new law now requires employers to notify their workers of worksite exposure to the disease. “Until today, existing state law did not require that employees be notified of COVID-19 exposures in the workplace, with tragic results,” said San Bernardino Assemblywoman Eloise Reyes, who authored the legislation. RELATED: Newsom Signs Bill Extending Paid Family Leave To 6 Million More Californians An employee wears a protective mask while sanitizing a cash register area inside a Sprouts Farmers Market grocery store in West Covina, California, U.S., on Friday, May 29, 2020. (credit: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg...
    California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomCalifornia family frustrated that governor, Harris used fire-damaged property for 'photo opportunity' Pac-12 moves toward 'return to competition' after Big Ten announces resumption of football season Ben Shapiro's Daily Wire leaving California: 'Terrible governance has consequences' MORE (D) on Thursday signed legislation expanding paid family leave benefits to those who work for employers with five or more employees. The legislation is set to expand job-protected family leave to approximately 6 million more California residents and allow workers affected by COVID-19, giving time to care for themselves or a family member.  “Californians deserve to be able to take time off to care for themselves or a sick family member without fearing they’ll lose their job,” Newsom said in a Thursday statement. “The COVID-19 pandemic has only further revealed the need for a family leave policy that truly serves families and workers, especially those who keep our economy running....
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- A new law in California lets more people than almost anywhere else in the country take up to three months off from work to care for a family member thanks in part to a nursing mother who brought her baby to work with her on the final day of the state legislative session to vote for it.Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the law on Thursday about two weeks after it squeaked through the state Legislature just minutes before a midnight deadline. It passed in part because Assemblywoman Buffy Wicks, a Democrat from Oakland, returned to the Legislature from her maternity leave to vote for it after her request to vote by proxy was denied by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon. He later apologized to Wicks.Wicks' cast her vote with her baby by her side. A video of her bringing her baby onto the Assembly floor was alter widely shared...
    Gov. Gavin Newsom signed two bills Thursday to protect essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.SB 1159 will make it easier for essential workers who test positive to have access to medical care and wage replacement benefits.AB 685 forces employers to be more transparent when someone tests positive for COVID-19 in the workplace, requiring them to report potentially exposed employees within 1 business day.Those are welcome measures to frontline workers like Albertsons grocery clerk Sharon Hechler, who has worked in Arcadia for 47 years."We're just trying to stay alive," Hechler said. "I thought the worst thing I've been through in my career was the 2003/2004 grocery industry strike, but no, this is much more difficult. We are just praying every day that we get through this."State officials say the new bills will help enforcement of workplace violations that can threaten the health of workers."Enforcement is critical to turning laws into reality...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Millions more Californians are now eligible for paid family leave benefits after Gov. Gavin Newsom signed legislation expanding the benefit to those who work for an employer with five or more employees. The legislation signed Thursday will expand the job-protected family leave to nearly 6 million more Californians and ensure that workers affected by COVID-19 have time to take care of themselves or a sick family member. “The COVID-19 pandemic has only further revealed the need for a family leave policy that truly serves families and workers, especially those who keep our economy running,” Newsom said in a statement. California’s Paid Family Leave program was first enacted more than 15 years ago, but prevented millions from accessing the benefit because their companies were too small. SB 1383 ensures job-protected leave for Californians who work for an employer with five or more employees to recover from an...
    By Adam Beam, Associated Press SACRAMENTO (AP) — California companies must warn their workers of any potential exposure to the coronavirus and must pay their employees workers compensation benefits if they get sick with the disease under two laws that Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Thursday. Newsom, a Democrat, signed the laws over the objections of business groups, who have said they are “unworkable.” One of the laws makes people who have the coronavirus eligible for workers compensation benefits. It takes effect immediately and applies to all workers in the state, but it treats first responders and health care workers differently than other employees. Police officers, firefighters and health care workers — including janitors who are in contact with COVID-19 patients — are eligible if they get infected while on the job. All other workers are eligible only if their workplaces experience an outbreak. For companies with between five and 100...
    By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California companies must warn their workers of any potential exposure to the coronavirus and they must pay their employees workers compensation benefits if they get sick with the disease under two laws Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Thursday. Newsom signed both laws over the objections of business groups, who say they are “unworkable." SB 1159 makes people who have the coronavirus eligible for workers compensation benefits. The law takes effect immediately and applies to all workers, but it treats first responders and health care workers differently. Newsom also signed AB 685. It says companies must tell their employees if they have been exposed to someone who tests positive for the coronavirus. Newsom signed both laws during a Zoom call with supporters, including labor unions. He said the laws “prioritize our workforce." Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California companies must warn their workers of any potential exposure to the coronavirus and they must pay their employees workers compensation benefits if they get sick with the disease under two laws Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Thursday. Newsom signed both laws over the objections of business groups, who say they are “unworkable.” SB 1159 makes people who have the coronavirus eligible for workers compensation benefits. The law takes effect immediately and applies to all workers, but it treats first responders and health care workers differently. Newsom also signed AB 685. It says companies must tell their employees if they have been exposed to someone who tests positive for the coronavirus. “Protecting workers is critical to slowing the spread of this virus,” Newsom said. “These two laws will help California workers stay safe at work and get the support they need if they are exposed to COVID-19.”...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KGO) -- Governor Gavin Newsom signed two bills Thursday protecting California's workforce amid the COVID-19 pandemic."Protecting workers is critical to slowing the spread of this virus," Gov. Newsom said in a press release.SB 1159, introduced by Senator Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo), expands access to workers' compensation and makes it easier for first responders, health care workers and people who test positive due to an outbreak at work to get the support they need. This includes receiving necessary medical care and wage replacement benefits.RELATED: CA farmworkers press Gov. Newsom to sign bill for COVID-19 reliefAB 685 by Assemblymember Eloise Gómez Reyes (D-San Bernardino) ensures timely notification to employees, local and state public health officials of positive cases in the workplace. This notification will help workers take necessary precautions such as seeking testing, getting medical help or complying with quarantine directives."These two laws will help California workers stay safe at...
    Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law last week that would allow a young adult who has gay sex with a minor to escape registering as a sex offender in some cases, based on a judge’s discretion. SB145, which was first introduced into the California State Legislature in January 2019 by state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), finally passed the 40-member state Senate by a vote of 23-10, as The Daily Wire reported. Proponents of the legislation such as Wiener claim the law, which provides a judge more leeway in statutory rape cases involving non-vaginal forms of sex, rectifies California’s historical discrimination against the LGBTQ community. Under SB145, if a young adult has gay sex with a minor 14 or older who is less than 10 years younger, a judge will have the discretion whether to place the individual on the sex offender registry. As the San...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a law that would give judges a say on whether to list someone as a sex offender for having oral or anal sex with a minor. The bill would expand the discretion currently granted judges in statutory rape cases and was promoted as bringing fairness under the law to LGBTQ defendants. The current law, in place for decades, permits judges to decide whether a man should be placed on California’s sex offender registry if he had voluntary intercourse with someone 14 to 17 years old and was no more than 10 years older than the person. But that discretion only applied to a man who had vaginal intercourse. The new change permits judges to use that same discretion when the case involves voluntary oral or anal sex. The measure won’t apply when a minor is under 14, when the...
    California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomNewsom signs legislation allowing pathway for inmate firefighters to become professional after release Trump to visit California Monday amid West Coast wildfires Biden hits Trump on climate: Western fires foreshadow 'unending barrage of tragedies' MORE (D) signed legislation changing the state’s sex offender law to allow judges to have a say on whether or not to list someone as a sex offender for having oral or anal sex with a minor.  The bill expands direction already granted to judges to decide if a man should be on California’s sex offender registry, but the existing discretion had applied only to a man who had vaginal intercourse, The Associated Press reported.  The legislation Newsom signed Friday permits judges to use the same discretion when the case involves voluntary oral or anal sex.  State Sen. Scott Wiener (D), who introduced the bill, said Newsom’s signing of the bill ended “blatant...
    Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-CA) signed a controversial bill into law Friday that will give judges greater discretion to decide whether adults who commit sodomy with minors should be placed on California’s sex offender registry. The bill, which passed the Democrat-led legislature last week, created a firestorm as proponents said its main purpose was to end discrimination against LGBT adults who have oral and anal sex with minors who claim to be consenting to the sexual activity. State Sen. Scott Wiener (D), who introduced the legislation, said in a statement on social media the new law would put an end to “blatant discrimination against young LGBT people engaged in consensual activity.” “It’s appalling that in 2020, California continues to discriminate against LGBTQ people, by mandating that LGBTQ young people be placed on the sex offender registry in situations where straight people aren’t required to be placed on the registry,” Wiener said....
    California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by National Industries for the Blind - Trump seeks to flip 'Rage' narrative; Dems block COVID-19 bill Trump speaks with California governor amid raging wildfires Raging wildfires close California's 18 national forests MORE (D) signed legislation Friday creating a pathway for inmate firefighters to become professionals after they are released.  The bill, AB2147, allows certain prisoners who are on the front lines of wildfire containment to have their records expunged after serving their sentences.  Without the barrier of a criminal record, the former prisoners can seek employment as firefighters. The bill excludes those convicted of certain crimes, such as murder, kidnapping, rape, arson or any felony punishable by death or life imprisonment. The news comes as California and other West Coast states combat devastating wildfires that have already killed 27 people as of Saturday afternoon.  Climate change has lead to hotter,...
    California’s Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a controversial new law regarding judges' discretion on whether or not to add individuals to the state’s sex offender registry who have committed sodomy with minors. Newsom signed the bill, passed by the Democratic-controlled state legislature, into law without comment on Friday, expanding the discretion granted to judges in statutory rape cases, according to ABC 7 News Los Angeles. California law permitted judges to decide whether a man was placed on the sex offender registry if he had consensual intercourse with someone 14 to 17 years old and was not more than 10 years older than the other person. However, that discretion only applied to vaginal intercourse, which LGBT advocates, including the author of the new bill signed into law Friday, argued was discriminatory to gay men. “This eliminates discrimination against LGBTQ youth in our criminal justice system,” the bill’s...
    SACRAMENTO -- California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a law that would give judges a say on whether to list someone as a sex offender for having oral or anal sex with a minor.The bill would expand the discretion currently granted judges in statutory rape cases and was promoted as bringing fairness under the law to LGBTQ defendants.The current law, in place for decades, permits judges to decide whether a man should be placed on California's sex offender registry if he had voluntary intercourse with someone 14 to 17 years old and was no more than 10 years older than the person.But that discretion only applied to a man who had vaginal intercourse. The new change permits judges to use that same discretion when the case involves voluntary oral or anal sex.The measure won't apply when a minor is under 14, when the age gap is larger than 10...
    OROVILLE – At an ash-covered picnic table in the North Complex Fire zone, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a bill that breaks down barriers preventing former inmate fire crew members from pursuing careers as firefighters after they have served their time. “This legislation rights a historic wrong and recognizes the sacrifice of thousands of incarcerated people who have helped battle wildfires in our state,” Newsom said in a statement. Authored by state Assemblywoman Eloise Gomez Reyes, AB 2147 allows nonviolent offenders who have fought fires as members of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s fire camps to have their records expunged and parole time waived, opening career paths in emergency response and a number of other fields. Despite their experience and qualifications, many formerly incarcerated firefighters struggle to obtain licenses and employment due to their criminal records, according to the governor’s office. “Rehabilitation without strategies to ensure the...
    OROVILLE (CBS SF) — Standing where firefighters have battled one of the many major wildfires burning across the state, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill Friday to remove barriers to inmate fire crews seeking careers as first responders once out of prison. Newsom held a press conference at the site of the North Complex Fire and signed AB 2147, allow nonviolent offenders who have fought fires as members of prison fire camps to have their records expunged, which would pave the way for former inmates to find employment and further training as firefighters. Former inmates are often prevented from applying for The bill would members of California Deparment of Correction and Rehabilitation (CDCR) fire crews file a petition to both expunge their records and waive parole time, enabling careers in emergency response and a variety of other disciplines. “Signing AB 2147 into law is about giving second chances. To...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill Friday afternoon to reform California's inmate firefighter program."Inmates who have stood on the frontlines battling historic fires should not be denied the right to later become a professional firefighter," Newsom said on Twitter after signing the assembly bill into law. CA’s inmate firefighter program is decades-old and has long needed reform.Inmates who have stood on the frontlines, battling historic fires should not be denied the right to later become a professional firefighter.Today, I signed #AB2147 that will fix that. pic.twitter.com/15GJ7Gijt7— Gavin Newsom (@GavinNewsom) September 11, 2020The bill paves the way for California inmates who've worked on the frontlines of wildfires to work professionally as a firefighter once they've successfully completed their prison time.CAL FIRE trains minimum-security prison inmates and pays them $1 per hour while in the field and $2 per day when they're not on duty, the Associated Press...
12