Sunday, Mar 07, 2021 - 13:35:35
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to declare racism:

    Virginia — whose state capital Richmond was once the capital of the Confederacy — is about to become the first state in the South to declare racism a public health crisis. The state Senate approved the declaration Tuesday and sent it to Gov. Ralph Northam — who’s expected to sign it. It had previously passed the House of Delegates on an almost party-line vote, with Democrats voting overwhelmingly in favor. The American Public Health Association says 145 cities and counties in 27 states have declared racism a public health issue — up from just seven in 2019. Virginia lawmakers also moved Tuesday to remove a statue of segregationist Harry F. Byrd Sr., who served as Virginia’s governor and a U.S. senator, will be removed from the state capitol grounds under a bill that won bipartisan final approval. By a vote of 36-3, the Senate advanced the measure that had already...
    Loading the player... New York State Sen. Kevin Parker has drafted a bill to have the New York State Health Department declare racism a “public health crisis.”  “Racism continues to cause a lack of resources and opportunities for people and communities of color and it has oftentimes led to long term negative effects that have plagued families for generations,” Parker wrote in a statement. “The COVID-19 Pandemic has exposed these inequities even further observing that predominantly black communities are seeing three times the rate of infection — and six times the rate of COVID-related deaths.”  “Racism continues to cause a lack of resources and opportunities for people and communities of color, and it has oftentimes led to long term negative effects that have plagued families for generations,” New York State Sen. Kevin Parker wrote in a statement announcing Senate Bill S8673A. In his announcement of Senate Bill S8673A, Parker referenced...
    A trio of Democrats on Thursday introduced legislation to declare structural racism a public health crisis and to create a federal government center to tackle racial disparities in health care for Black communities and other minorities. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., teamed up with Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., to unveil their plan to require the federal government to begin actively developing "anti-racist health policy." The lawmakers pointed to the coronavirus pandemic and police brutality ‒ which has set off a summer of racial unrest in America ‒ as reasons to pass the legislation. DEMS CALL FOR BREAKDOWN OF CORONAVIRUS CASES BY RACE, ETHNICITY “It is time we start treating structural racism like we would treat any other public health problem or disease: investing in research into its symptoms and causes and finding ways to mitigate its effects," Warren, the former presidential candidate, said in a statement. "My bill with Representatives Lee and Pressley is a first step...
    Michigan and Nevada both declared that “racism” was a “public health crisis” on Wednesday, joining Wisconsin, with Colorado set to soon become the fourth state to do so. Michigan Democrat Governor Gretchen Whitmer created a Black Leadership Advisory Council to “elevate Black voices” and reportedly push state employees to undergo implicit bias training. “Today, I also signed an executive directive declaring racism as a public health crisis in Michigan,” Whitmer said on Wednesday. “We have a lot of work to do to eradicate the systemic racism that black Americans have faced for generations, and it’s going to take time. But the most important thing we can do during this time is work closely with leaders across the state, in every community, to find the root cause of problems and work to eradicate them.” In Nevada, Democrat Governor Steve Sisolak signed a proclamation on Wednesday that also declared that racism was...
    A health official in Ohio who declared racism a public health crisis has apologized for reportedly appearing in a photo wearing blackface, according to Cleveland 19. Terry Allan, the Cuyahoga County Board of Health Commissioner, confirmed that it was him in a photo from a Halloween party in 1990 dressed in blackface as Buckwheat from the TV show “Little Rascals,” Cleveland 19 reported. 19 Investigates has uncovered a top health official posed for a Halloween photo in Blackface 30 years ago. Tonight, Cuyahoga County Health Commissioner Terry Allan is apologizing, saying the photo does not reflect who he is or ever was. READ MORE: https://t.co/99SADAqkiQ pic.twitter.com/oQdiAWPLlI — Sara Goldenberg (@SaraGoldenberg) August 4, 2020 Allan apologized for the action, saying he was “very young” and it was “clearly wrong.” (RELATED: Northam Says Blackface, KKK Photo Helped Him Understand ‘Black Oppression’) “That since then—what I didn’t realize when I was younger...
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment announced at a “town hall” meeting on Thursday that it would declare racism a public health crisis. Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, told the Denver Post that the agency will join the American Public Health Association in defining race and social inequalities as a broader health concern. She said the move is a response to a push from her staff to address the issue, saying, “I like it when my employees push me on this issue to go faster and to use language they think is more descriptive.” The department had already published an open letter on its website calling the deaths of “George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Rayshard Brooks, and untold others” a symptom of “deeply-rooted systemic and institutional racism that has dehumanized and recklessly taken the lives of people of color for generations,”...
    Colorado is declaring racism a public health crisis, after the employees inside the state's Department of Public Health and Environment put pressure on its top health official to address the issue. Jill Hunsaker Ryan, the executive director of the department, told The Denver Post that the stance would become formal policy within the department. The declaration aligns Colorado with the American Public Health Association (APHA), which first declared systemic racism in the U.S. a public health crisis back at the beginning of June — shortly after Minneapolis police killed George Floyd, a Black man. In making the declaration, Hunsaker Ryan said that she has a couple of goals: Increase diversity among the department's workforce and make it easier for local organizations that serve people of color to partner with the state. Currently, the department is nearly 78 percent white, the Post says. Additionally, the APHA has declared police violence as a public...
    DENVER (AP) — At the urging of Department of Public Health and Environment employees, Colorado will join other state and local governments in declaring racism a public health crisis. The pending declaration addresses diversity inside the department as well as the coronavirus' disproportionate impact on people of color, The Denver Post reported Friday. It comes amid the ongoing national reckoning over race following the death of George Floyd, a Black man, at the hands of police in Minneapolis. Department employees had sought the declaration since June, the Post reported. Executive Director Jill Hunsaker Ryan said the state will join other state and local governments, including Jefferson County, in declaring racism a health crisis. Black and Latino residents comprise nearly 5% and 36%, respectively, of COVID-19 cases in Colorado, and nearly 7% and 22%, respectively, of virus-related deaths. Blacks comprise just nearly 4% of the state's population; Latinos, 22%, the health...
    Business groups, organizations and citizens are coming out in favor of a resolution that would declare racism a public health crisis. Dozens of parties have submitted testimony in favor of Senate Concurrent Resolution 14. On Wednesday, the state Senate Health, Human Services and Medicaid Committee held a second hearing on the measure. As drafted, the resolution would, in part, define terms concerning racism and health equity, promote community dialogue and look at vendors and grant recipients “with a racial equity lens,” state Sen. Hearcel F. Craig, D-Columbus, said in sponsor testimony. The resolution would create a working group to make recommendations on additional actions. “Our resolution wants to reverberate the disparities that are inextricably linked in health care, Ohio’s prisons, the digital divide within education and health care services, economic opportunities, our education system, more likely to be uninsured, and access to affordable and adequate housing,”...
    Santa Clara County officials are pushing to declare racism a public health crisis in response to both the coronavirus pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement as local civil rights leaders call on them for more meaningful systemic change. On Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors will vote on two resolutions spawned by both recent anti-police brutality protests and data showing that Black and Latinx residents have disproportionately been infected and died from COVID-19. If approved, the resolutions would affirm that Black lives matter and incorporate more race and health-based initiatives into county government operations. Local civil rights leaders called the resolutions a positive first step but emphasized that the county must push beyond symbolic gestures to uproot racism. “This is the beginning of the conversation, and it’s a good start — and the community would like to see it go further and ensure that we have more than just words...
    Two Democrat lawmakers in Michigan introduced a resolution on the state’s Senate floor Wednesday to declare racism a public health crisis. The resolution -- put forth by Sens. Marshall Bullock, D-Detroit, and Erika Geiss, D-Taylor -- calls on the state to “commit to working collaboratively with the Governor and every sector of society to develop an ongoing strategy to address, fund, and support solutions that strategically reduce the long-term impact that racism has on the quality of life and health for citizens of color.” According to MLive, African-Americans make up 13.6 percent of Michigan’s population but account for 40 percent of its COVID-19 deaths. Bullock said on the Senate floor that the coronavirus trends have been attributed to diabetes, high blood pressure and a lack of access to reliable health care, as well as crowded living situations. But he said underlying health conditions in communities of color can be linked to social...
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