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    An Oakland teacher has blasted 'rich white parents' complaining that distance learning amid the pandemic has impacted their children's mental health and accused them of 'causing their kids' anxiety by pressuring them to complete asynchronous work'. Bethany Meyer, a special education teacher at Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) and secretary of teachers' union the Oakland Education Association (OEA), told California parents eager to get their children back to school to 'take a seat' in a social media post last week. 'All the rich white parents suddenly concerned about mental health can take a seat,' she wrote on Twitter February 17. 'Most of them are causing their kids' anxiety by pressuring them to complete asynchronous work and feeding into their sense of entitlement. Sorry/not sorry.'  Her tweet comes amid the ongoing storm around schools reopening as parents and lawmakers are pushing for schools to reopen, while teachers and teachers' unions are concerned...
    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor denied an emergency injunction to parents seeking to have their children enrolled in remote learning programs without meeting local vaccination requirements. “Excluding medically fragile children from distance learning because they are missing a vaccine that might harm or kill them serves no valid state interest and will cause irreparable harm,” the group of anonymous parents argued. “Excluding them even from online access to school and remote special education services is cruel, inhuman and can serve only punitive purposes.” “The state’s vaccination rules remain in force even though many children admitted at schools are learning remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic,” attorneys for the state of New York argued in their response. “Because remote-learning children remain part of the community, lower vaccination rates among them could contribute to contagious disease outbreaks.” The parents told the court that their children are medically fragile and...
    The impact of school shutdowns and the switch to virtual learning may take years to fully understand, but parents and caretakers across the country are already witnessing disturbing signs of fatigue and trauma in their children after months of separation from peers and classrooms. When schools shut down in March and April due to the COVID-19 pandemic, students and their parents had not envisioned that the approaching summer vacation would lead into a new school year that would also be held virtually. For many families, a few weeks of school closings were manageable, although burdensome, especially for single-parent and working households.  But as the 2020 comes to an end, parents explained to the Daily Caller that extensive damage has already been done. They describe failing grades, despair, and their child’s sense of invisibility to the world that surrounds them after being away from their peers and classrooms for months with...
    (CNN)When I was 9 years old, a psychologist told my parents I had a low IQ because I was born with Down syndrome. Seven years later, I graduated high school as class valedictorian. At the age of 20, I received a bachelor's degree in arts with a major in history. Today, I am a pre-school assistant teacher, a Special Olympics Global Youth Ambassador and Sargent Shriver International Global Messenger. I am also the 2020 UNESCO Global Champion for Inclusion in Education.Brina Maxino.I don't think about what that psychologist said when I was a child, but I wonder how many children with disabilities are not fulfilling their potential because someone once said they couldn't.We can be more -- and do more. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. The recently released "2020 UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report" (GEM) states that children and youth with disabilities are among the most marginalized and excluded...
    In a significant move to bring more students back to campus, Los Angeles County schools will be permitted to bring 25% of their students back to campus at a time, provided that they need special services best offered in person. Students receiving priority would include those learning English and those with disabilities The action announced Wednesday by Supervisor Kathryn Barger comes in response to pressure to allow more students on campus and reports that schools elsewhere have reopened with relative safety during the coronavirus pandemic. “We will now increase to 25% capacity for high-needs students, so more children and youth can have access to their teachers and on-site support systems that are so critical for their growth and education,” Barger said. The protocol for that expansion will likely be released next week, she said. The county’s announcement comes as evidence mounts that students are faring poorly in online learning...
    Many families living on the road have been homeschooling their children for years. @themomtrotter/Instagram/@thefites/Instagram Children are spending more time learning at home. While some are learning virtually, others are being homeschooled for the first time this school year.  Insider spoke to four families who lived in RVs while homeschooling their children. They shared advice they have for families who are now taking the reigns on their children's learning. Sign up for our new parenting newsletter Insider Parenting here. Ash Fite's first year of homeschooling her daughter was sprinkled with stress and freak-outs. Not from her daughter Everly, who was 5 at the time; the stress came from Fite. She said she was constantly nervous that she wasn't doing enough or teaching the right way. But over time, Ash noticed that Everly would pick things up and learn in all types of circumstances.  "We put a lot of pressure...
    As the third week in September began, millions of American parents experienced firsthand exactly what it means to be saddled with a president who bungled this country’s response to the worst public health crisis in over a century, leaving their children unable to attend grade-school classes or college lectures in person, and forcing them instead to flail through what is known as “virtual learning” for now and well into the foreseeable future. As one angry parent writing for ScaryMommy put it, all this follows an entire angst-ridden summer fraught with anxiety, with beleaguered parents commiserating on Zoom meetings and social media about what is now, inevitably, occurring in real time. This back-to-school season is unlike anything American parents have ever experienced. There are no good options. Whatever you choice you make, you’re a terrible parent according to your neighbor or another parent at your kids’ school or the internet. Whatever choice you make,...
    North Korea has tripled the amount of propaganda taught to pre-school children, forcing pupils to spend half their school day learning about Kim Jong Un under new orders handed down by his sister.  The new curriculum specifies that 'Greatness Education', which focuses on the upbringing of Kim Jong Un and his two predecessors, must take up half of the three hours preschoolers spend in class.  Previously, the children would only spend half an hour on the subject, but the leader's sister, Kim Yo Jong, has reportedly tripled the requirement under new rules brought in late last month.  North Korea has tripled the dose of propaganda taught to children, so now leader-worship makes up half of the school day, under new orders handed down by Kim Jong Un's sister. A North Korean school pictured above  The dose of propaganda taught to North Korean children has been tripled on the orders...
    VIDEO3:4703:47Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan on getting kids back to school safelySquawk on the Street When I drove my son to school for the first time since March, I was overcome with gratitude for the faculty and staff who have worked countless hours preparing to bring students back to the classroom safely. As a mother, sending my child to school in-person this fall felt like the greatest gift — even amid a public health crisis and strict social gathering guidelines. But I know not all parents feel the same. Erin Silver, 35, moved her son out of his school because she did not want him to attend face-to-face. Instead, the Ridgewood, New Jersey, resident paid a premium to enroll him in a remote learning program and hired a nanny to help monitor his activity, since Silver and her husband both work full time.   Because Silver's husband suffers from asthma, "there...
    The host of Comedy Central's nightly news and satire show questioned why parents have gender reveal parties when the child is not "old enough to know their actual gender." South African comedian Trevor Noah, who hosts the Daily Social Distancing Show, highlighted out-of-control wildfires in Big Creek, California, that were started because of a gender reveal party. Noah noted that the practice of parents celebrating the gender of their child feels "outdated" to him, "given everything we're learning about gender." "Celebrating a baby’s genitalia is starting to feel very outdated," Noah said. "Like, given everything we’re learning about gender, gender reveal parties should only happen when the child is old enough to know their actual gender." [email protected]: The problem w/ gender reveal parties is that parents don’t know the gender until the child grows up and decides pic.twitter.com/JZP96GcJzR— Tom Elliott (@tomselliott) September 9, 2020 Riffing off the fire that...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City The number of families keeping their children home this fall continues to grow as parents remain skeptical of the city’s ability to safely reopening schools for in-person learning this year.  On Tuesday, the Department of Education reported that as of Friday, Sept. 4, 389,666 public school students — 23,113 more than the week prior—requested to opt-out of the city’s blended learning model where students learn in classrooms and from home. That number is expected to keep changing given that students can opt out of blended learning at any time during the school year.  Parents, teachers and principals have worried about the logical and health challenges that come with reopening school buildings during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic for months and concerns are mounting as the city inches closer to the start on classes...
    Students as young as 6 years old are transitioning from classroom to remote learning. Getty Images Social media videos and photos of children struggling with virtual learning are resonating with parents across the nation as their own children navigate the challenges of online classes. One viral video from a Missouri mom shows her fifth-grade son crying alone in his bedroom. Another from a mom in Georgia shows her son with his head in his hands. With the lack of opportunity to socialize with peers and receive personalized instruction, students learning less from a virtual environment could be another devastating consequence of the coronavirus pandemic. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Social media posts of children struggling with the challenges of virtual learning reflect the many challenges families are facing while navigating the difficulties of "attending" school remotely. One video that a mom of a fifth-grader in Missouri...
    Wealthy New York City parents are spending upwards of $70,000 to hire private educators to oversee their children when while learning remotely. Fox News reported that the parents are already paying five-figure private school tuitions, and will now be paying even more to set up “pods” of four to 10 students in the same grade who will be led by a private educator. From Fox: Christopher Rim, founder of the education and college consulting firm Command Education, has been inundated with calls from “desperate parents” demanding leaders for pods that they’ve created with other families. He’s already staffed four pods in the Hamptons with tutors and expects to close in on 10 by the time the school year begins, with kids expected to rotate learning at a different home each week. One Water Mill parent already volunteered her 13-bedroom manse as the permanent home base of her kid’s 11th-grade four-person...
    A school district in Tennessee told parents they should not attempt to observe their children's online classes and threatened that children of parents who violate that policy could be removed from class, according to the Tennessee Star. Appealing to academic privacy concerns for students, Rutherford County Schools sent a form to parents for them to sign and agree not to listen in on what their kids are learning. The Star obtained a copy of the form. "RCS strives to present these opportunities in a secure format that protects student privacy to the greatest extent possible, however because these meetings will occur virtually RCS is limited in its ability to fully control certain factors such as non-student observers that may be present in the home of a student participating in the virtual meeting," the form reads. "RCS strongly discourages non student observation of online meetings due to the potential of...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Many students in our area will not be stepping foot into a school for some time, if at all, this school year. But that doesn’t mean parents can skip many tasks on that back-to-school checklist. Morning Insider Lauren Victory explains why one painful chore is still a must do–child immunizations. Even though they hurt to get, everyone’s health depends on it. Nurse Sarah Lonsway says keeping up with immunizations–even the infants–is more important now than ever. “It provides us with the best protection, so we don’t have any outbreaks besides the pandemic, like a measles outbreak,” said Lonsway. The Northwestern Memorial Hospital vaccine clinic is prepared for pandemic panicked parents, and the Delnor Hospital fridge in Geneva is stocked for last minute back to school vaccinations. Geneva District 304 sent out a reminder this week–an important assignment ahead of class on Monday. “Kindergarten is a big one...
    A couple of weeks before the first day of school, Amanda received a welcome kit from the Texas high school she’s set to teach theater at this year. The kit included a cloth mask and a face shield — the personal protective equipment (PPE) she’s expected to wear when she spends time on campus this semester. However, neither piece seemed particularly reliable. “It’s a three-layer cloth mask— it’s not a medical mask — and the face shield looks like it was made by a Booster Club,” Amanda tells The News Brig. “But I mean, I’ll take it because I know some of my other teacher friends aren’t receiving PPE at all; they’re having to pay out of pocket to get masks for themselves.” Amanda officially started teaching classes this week, along with thousands of other teachers across the country. Amanda is not her real name. She didn’t want her name...
    Some parents in Massachusetts told the Boston Globe they were reported to the state's Department of Children and Families for neglect when their children were absent from remote learning sessions too often in the spring, when they were scrambling to adjust to the new realities of COVID-19. What happened? When schools around the country closed in March and April, parents were forced to figure out a way to facilitate and assist with online learning for their children while working or taking care of other responsibilities. The schools, in many cases, failed to provide a well-coordinated learning plan for the lockdowns. Still, dozens of parents interviewed by the Globe say schools reported them for potential neglect because of absences, without regard for the obvious difficulties of the situation. From the Globe:Massachusetts school officials have reported dozens of families to state social workers for possible neglect charges because of issues related...
    Masks have become the essential accessory in times of pandemic, but they have erased facial expressions, necessary to communicate and educate children at an early age, that is why several organizations such as the Kiwanis club, the Florida Association for Mental and Child Health, among others, drive the initiative, faces are essential. Jacky Romillo, vice president of the Florida Association for Mental and Child Health, explains that “very young children need to see the faces of the people who care for them, the parents and also the teachers and if the children cannot see the expression of the teachers prevents him from learning a bit. “ Congresswoman Donna Shalala attended the event that took place at the United Way Center for the delivery of transparent masks or Clear Mask to donate a box of these facial coverings. “It’s a great idea because kids can see the faces of their...
    A student leaves the Thurgood Marshal Elementary school after all Seattle Public Schools were abruptly closed due to coronavirus fears on March 11, 2020 in Seattle, Washington. Schools will be closed for a minimum of two weeks. The system is the largest public school district in Washington State.John Moore/Getty Images Distance learning got off to a rough start in this past spring. Fall might not be much better and the stakes now are higher. Across the country, reopening plans vary, with many school districts still scrambling. Even in areas that are planning to return to in-person learning, students may not resume a full-time schedule.   Going forward, students will likely see smaller classes and staggered scheduling, which could include alternating days of the week or times of the day, to help limit the number of people physically present in a building at any time, according to guidelines set by the...
    ARLINGTON, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Theatre Arlington is starting a virtual learning program to help working parents come fall. Staff won’t teach children, but monitor their virtual learning and offer support while facilitating breaks and afternoon programming like yoga or art. Theatre Arlington’s Education Director Cindy Honeycutt says it’s all in hopes to provide relief for parents who can’t stay home and help teach their children. “They’re not teaching because teachers are already in place for the virtual program, but they’ll be able to help them use those tools that I’ve been given to them to the best of their ability,” she said. The camp is available to children grades 3 through 9. Masks will be required for children over 10 and temperatures will be checked at the door. Honeycutt said only 10 students will be allowed in a room at a time to make sure that they are social distancing...
    Children in Austin will be able to complete their work inside a school building when the academic year starts under the care of the YMCA while virtual learning is in effect, KXAN reported. The Austin Independent School District suspended in-person education and will instead implement virtual learning for the first three weeks of the school year, which has left many working parents scrambling to find childcare during the day. For $195 per week, children would be placed in classrooms of about 10 students, according to KXAN. The initiative is an extension of the YMCA’s summer program, and will include temperature screening every morning and classroom cleanings every hour. Masks are expected to be worn whenever possible.  FORT WORTH – APRIL 30: Fort Worth Independent School District custodian Necie Homer wipes down a classroom with disinfectant in an effort to stop the spread of the swine flu virus at Arlington Heights...
    A MUM-OF-FOUR who took her kids out of school because it was too much "pressure" has revealed she won't send them back - because they're "learning more" now. Amy Sayle, 42, from Victoria, Australia, and concrete pump operator husband Steve, 44, took their daughter Ebony, now 18, out of mainstream education when she was 13. 9Amy Sayle pictured with kids Ebony, 18, Bodhi, nine, and Kai, sevenCredit: PA Real Life Seeing how she flourished with 'unschooling', where kids only learn what they want to, the couple took their sons Bodhi, nine, and Kai, seven, out of school too. Although their eldest Jesse, 23, went to a conventional school for his whole education, Amy says her views shifted when social media came into play. Amy, a photographer, explained: "When social media came into play, the world completely changed - and with it came extra pressures and anxieties for children. "With Ebony, I felt like the peer pressure was...
    Earlier this summer, Kristina Boshernitzan and a group of neighbors stood in the driveway of her Austin home for a socially distanced meeting to figure out how to take greater control of their childrens’ educations. With the coronavirus spreading unpredictably and plans to safely reopen schools shifting day by day, the parents grappled with the increasing prospect that it might be unsafe, or impossible, to send their children back to school in the fall. Each faced difficult decisions. One neighbor's husband had stage 4 cancer, and she didn’t want her children to expose him to the new coronavirus, which they might pick up in a classroom. Another mother had young twins with lung issues. Just a cold is enough to send them to the hospital, and they can take no risk of being exposed to COVID-19. Boshernitzan, who works full-time at a nonprofit, wanted parents to pool resources and find...
    As local school districts across the country struggle to develop reopening plans in the face of uncertainty about a possible resurgence of COVID-19 and teachers' unions that are in many cases holding districts hostage with laundry lists of insane leftist demands, many parents are responding by pulling their children out of public schools altogether in favor of homeschooling. In Texas, the Texas Homeschool Coalition says they have been "flooded" with calls from parents who have been dissatisfied with the distance learning they received from their public school system during the spring shutdowns, and have decided to pull their kids out of public school entirely and homeschool them. After the Texas Education Agency announced that schools in Texas will be permitted to use online-only learning for at least the first 8 weeks, the Texas Homeschool Coalition estimated that their average weekly number of contacts from interested parents doubled. ...
    A state-by-state map shows millions of American schoolchildren will be back in the classroom when the 2020-2021 academic year commences.  Almost all students have been learning from home since the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to shutter across the country in mid-March.  But many are set to reopen their doors from next month,  despite the fact that cases of COVID-19 continue to surge.  On Thursday, the country shattered its daily record for COVID-19 cases with more than 77,000 new infections reported in just 24 hours. More than 3.5 million people across the country have contracted the contagious virus, and 141,00 have died.   President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have been pushing for a full reopening of schools across the country.  On Thursday, Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters: 'When President Trump says open, he means open and full, kids being able to attend each and every day at their school....
    American Air Makes Big Bet on NYC, Boston With JetBlue Alliance Der Nacht-Wagen: Inside the 2020 Mercedes-AMG G63 at Night As COVID-19 continues to surge, more parents plan to home school their kids Rachel Ellsworth never thought she’d home school her children. Even when she started distance learning with 10-year-old Brigit and 7-year-old Joseph, she loathed it. She just wanted them to make it to summer. But as COVID-19 cases kept climbing in the United States — and especially in Florida where she lives — the medical intensive care nurse felt she could not send her children back to school. “It became pretty obvious to me that this was not going to be better by August,” the 36-year-old from Indian Harbor Beach told TODAY Parents. “When the governor said that he was opening schools again I just decided, nope.” © Courtesy Rachel Ellsworth As part of their A recent...
    Hillary Clinton appeared to sour at the Trump administration urging schools to reopen for in-person learning in the Fall, stating that teachers should not have to face the choice between “their lives and their jobs.” “Teachers shouldn’t be forced to choose between their lives and their jobs,” the former Trump challenger said on Tuesday: Teachers shouldnt be forced to choose between their lives and their jobs. — Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) July 14, 2020 Clinton’s remark comes as states begin to roll out their visions for safely reopening schools in the coming weeks, following months of closures due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Florida Department of Education took a concrete step last week via an executive order signed by Florida Department of Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran. The order requires “all school boards and charter school governing boards” to open “brick and mortar schools at least five days per week for all...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — A New York Times article arguing about the need for students to return to the classroom is flying in the face of federal and state health experts. The CDC has advised distance learning is the safest option amidst the coronavirus crisis. But a recent recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics isn’t giving that strategy high marks – saying there isn’t a lot of learning happening, and that it leads to behavioral health problems. Clinical psychologist Erika Frieze isn’t surprised. “I think it’s really affected their mental health, especially,” Frieze said. She has three school-aged children herself and says the stress of distance learning has been almost a trauma for students and parents. “I feel like we are trying to hold it together for our kids,” Frieze said. Many agree and support reopening schools with modifications like social distancing, mask-wearing, and staggered class schedules. “She is missing...
    EXCLUSIVE: Two Republican lawmakers plan to introduce legislation on Thursday that would cut off federal funding to any school that does not reopen for in-person learning in the fall after being shuttered due to the coronavirus pandemic, Fox News has learned.Reps. Jim Banks, R-Ind., and Tom Tiffany, R-Wisc., will introduce the Reopen Our Schools Act Thursday amid concerns over the effectiveness of remote learning that has been implemented since the beginning of the public health crisis earlier this year. “We need to change the subject from ‘our schools might not reopen in the fall’ to ‘our schools will reopen in the fall and here’s what we need to do it,’” Banks said in a statement provided to Fox News. “America is the land of opportunity where education is guaranteed to all children. We’re not living up that guarantee at the moment.” The bill follows a report in the Wall Street Journal...
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