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Tennessee’s women’s:

    GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Zia Cooke scored 17 points and Aliyah Boston had 15 points and 11 rebounds as No. 7 South Carolina rolled past No. 14 Tennessee 67-52 Saturday night and into the SEC Tournament title game for the sixth time in seven years. The defending champion Gamecocks (21-4) will seek their sixth tournament crown since 2015 on Sunday against No. 16 Georgia, which beat top-seeded and No. 2 Texas A&M 74-68 in the other semifinal. This semi was never close once South Carolina took off on a 19-2 burst to close first quarter for a 29-13 lead. Unlike the first meeting between these teams — Tennessee rallied from 16 down to hand South Carolina its first SEC loss in two seasons — the Gamecocks kept the pressure up throughout. Tennessee (16-7) was trying for its first finals appearance since 2015. That year it lost the...
              A bill in the Tennessee General Assembly would require that middle school or high school students’ biological gender determine whether they may participate in interscholastic sports specifically tailored either for males or females. Supporters of the bill told The Tennessee Star Friday they believe the bill will pass both the state house and the state senate. State Sen. Joey Hensley (R-Hohenwald) and State Rep. Scott Cepicky (R-Culleoka) are the bill’s primary sponsors, according to the Tennessee General Assembly’s website. Cepicky was unavailable for comment Friday. Hensley, in an email, told The Star his bill has already passed the subcommittee and the full committee in the Tennessee House of Representatives. Members of the Tennessee Senate will vote on the bill next week, he said. “It just passed through the Senate Education Committee this week. The purpose of this bill is to protect women’s right...
    A Tennessee bill that limits transgender participation in school sports is headed to the state's House after clearing an initial committee hurdle. The bill, which was introduced on Jan. 19, "requires, for the purposes of participation in a middle school or high school interscholastic athletic activity or event, that a student's gender be determined by the student's sex at the time of the student's birth." The legislation passed the state Senate Education Committee by an 8-1 vote Wednesday. A birth certificate must be displayed to prove the student's sex, and the legislation "requires the state board of education, local boards of education, and governing bodies of public charter schools to adopt and enforce policies to ensure compliance," the text added. The mandate would not apply to K-4 institutions. Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Feb. 10 said transgender athletes would "destroy women's sports." “I do believe...
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Rennia Davis scored all 26 of her points in the second half, with 20 in the fourth quarter, to help No. 20 Tennessee beat Missouri 78-73 on Thursday night. Davis made a pair of 3-pointers during an 8-0 run that opened the fourth quarter and gave the Lady Vols (14-6, 8-4 SEC) the lead for good. Davis scored all but three of Tennessee’s fourth-quarter points. Her 26 points matched a season high. Rae Burrell scored 18 of her 23 points in the first half for the Lady Vols. Burrell was 9 of 13 from the field and 3 of 5 from 3-point range. She left the game late in the third quarter with an apparent right ankle injury but returned early in the fourth. Haley Troup and Aijha Blackwell had 16 points each for the Tigers (8-10, 4-9). Troup matched a career high she set on...
    ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Gabby Connally scored 24 points, Jordan Isaacs blocked a last-second shot and No. 22 Georgia defeated No. 21 Tennessee 57-55 on Sunday for the Bulldogs’ first sweep of the Lady Vols in 36 years. A missed free throw by Connally with 22.1 seconds to go and alternating turnovers gave Tennessee a last chance with 10.2 seconds left. Top scorer Rennia Davis got the ball in the backcourt, worked to the left wing and put up a 3-point attempt that Isaacs got her fingers on for the Bulldogs’ season-high 12th block. With a come-from-17-behind 67-66 win on Jan. 14 — their first in Knoxville in 25 seasons — Georgia earned the season sweep for the first time since 1984-85. Que Morrison added 11 points for Georgia (17-4, 9-4 Southeastern Conference), which moved into a tie for third in the loss column with Tennessee. Jenna Staiti had 12...
    By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal court on Friday denied a request to keep Tennessee's 48-hour waiting period for abortions in effect while it hears an appeal of a lower court's ruling that found it unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman ruled in October that Tennessee’s waiting period law serves no legitimate purpose while placing a substantial burden on women who seek abortions in Tennessee. The 2015 law required women to make two trips to an abortion clinic, first for mandatory counseling and then for the abortion at least 48 hours later. Directors of Tennessee abortion clinics testified at the 2019 trial that the two-visit requirement posed logistical challenges that caused abortions to be delayed far beyond the 48 hours required by law. The delay pushed some women beyond the time when they could have medication abortions, which have lower risks of complications than surgical...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal court on Friday denied a request to keep Tennessee’s 48-hour waiting period for abortions in effect while it hears an appeal of a lower court’s ruling that found it unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Bernard Friedman ruled in October that Tennessee’s waiting period law serves no legitimate purpose while placing a substantial burden on women who seek abortions in Tennessee. The 2015 law required women to make two trips to an abortion clinic, first for mandatory counseling and then for the abortion at least 48 hours later. Directors of Tennessee abortion clinics testified at the 2019 trial that the two-visit requirement posed logistical challenges that caused abortions to be delayed far beyond the 48 hours required by law. The delay pushed some women beyond the time when they could have medication abortions, which have lower risks of complications than surgical abortions. A few women...
            by Vivian Jones  Responding to a bill in the Tennessee Legislature that would ban transgender individuals from participating in girls’ middle school and high school athletics, Gov. Bill Lee said Wednesday that trans participation would “destroy women’s sports.” Speaking to reporters at the state Capitol on Wednesday, Lee stopped short of voicing support for a Tennessee bill that would prohibit trans students from participating in middle and high school girls’ athletics, but he spoke to the issue. “Transgenders participating in women’s sports will destroy women’s sports,” Lee said. “It will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn’t been there. I think it’s bad for women and for women’s sports.” Lee said the Tennessee bill came about as a result of a recent executive order by President Joe Biden specifically allowing transgender athletes to...
              Several state representatives and senators have proposed a bill to review the constitutionality of presidential executive orders. According to the bills, if Congress doesn’t affirm an executive order and isn’t signed into law, then the joint government operations committee of Tennessee’s General Assembly would review whether the order overextends its scope of authority. Upon concluding their review, the committee would decide whether to recommend the Tennessee Attorney General and governor to reexamine or seek an exemption from the order. Additionally, the bill proposed that no state agency, political subdivision, elected officials, or government employees could enforce the order if the Tennessee Attorney General determines it is unconstitutional. That portion of the proposed bill would specifically apply to orders concerning pandemics or public health emergencies; natural resource regulations; agricultural industry regulations; land use regulations; financial regulations concerning environmental, social, or governance standards; and Second Amendment regulations....
    Tennessee Republican Gov. Bill Lee said transgender athletes competing in women's sports will have undesirable consequences for biological women. “I do believe that transgenders participating in women’s sports will destroy women’s sports,” Lee said on Wednesday. “It will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn’t been there in some time. I think it’s bad for women and for women’s sports.” The governor's remarks follow a bill circulating in his state that would mandate school athletes prove their sex matches their birth certificate in order to compete. The legislation coincides with an executive order from President Biden, signed on his first day in office, titled Preventing and Combating Discrimination on the Basis of Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation, which includes a provision that "children should be able to learn without worrying about whether they will be denied access...
    Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (R) said Wednesday that the inclusion of transgender participants would “destroy women's sports.” A requirement that student athletes prove their biological sex matches their “original” birth certificate is being advanced by Republicans in the state legislature. "I do believe that transgenders participating in women's sports will destroy women's sports," Lee told reporters, according to the Associated Press, adding “it will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn't been there for some time, and I think it's bad for women and women's sports." The AP notes that similar bills are going through more than a dozen other state governments. Lee reportedly did not confirm whether or not he would sign the Tennessee legislation if it reaches his desk. A similar bill passed the Tennessee House of Representatives last year but stalled in the Senate. Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons has...
    Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Wednesday that transgender girls should be banned from playing on middle and high school sports teams or they will "destroy women's sports." "I do believe that transgenders participating in women’s sports will destroy women’s sports," Lee, who is up for reelection next year, told reporters. "It will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn’t been there in some time. I think it’s bad for women and for women’s sports." CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Lee's comments come as Tennessee Republicans began advancing a proposal this week requiring student athletes to prove that the student’s sex matches the student’s "original" birth certificate in order to participate in public school sports. If a birth certificate is unavailable, then the parents must provide another form of evidence "indicating the student’s sex at the time...
    By JONATHAN MATTISE and KIMBERLEE KRUESI, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Wednesday advocated for banning transgender girls from playing on middle and high school sports teams, saying transgender athletes will “destroy women's sports.” “I do believe that transgenders participating in women’s sports will destroy women’s sports,” Lee, who is up for reelection next year, told reporters. “It will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn’t been there in some time. I think it’s bad for women and for women’s sports.” Lee's comments come as Tennessee Republicans began advancing a proposal this week requiring student athletes to prove that the student’s sex matches the student’s “original” birth certificate in order to participate in public school sports. If a birth certificate is unavailable, then the parents must provide another form of evidence “indicating...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Wednesday advocated for banning transgender girls from playing on middle and high school sports teams, saying transgender athletes will “destroy women’s sports.” “I do believe that transgenders participating in women’s sports will destroy women’s sports,” Lee, who is up for reelection next year, told reporters. “It will ruin the opportunity for girls to earn scholarships. It will put a glass ceiling back over women that hasn’t been there in some time. I think it’s bad for women and for women’s sports.” Lee’s comments come as Tennessee Republicans began advancing a proposal this week requiring student athletes to prove that the student’s sex matches the student’s “original” birth certificate in order to participate in public school sports. If a birth certificate is unavailable, then the parents must provide another form of evidence “indicating the student’s sex at the time of birth.”...
    No. 1 leads 37-22 Feb. 8, 2020 — (2) UConn 63, (1) South Carolina 59, OT, at Storrs, Conn. Jan. 10, 2019 — (1) Notre Dame 82, (2) Louisville 68, at South Bend, Ind. Dec. 2, 2018 — (2) UConn 89, (1) Notre Dame 71, at South Bend, Ind. Dec. 7, 2016 — (1) UConn 72, (2) Notre Dame 61, at South Bend, Ind. Feb. 8, 2016 — (1) UConn 66, (2) South Carolina 54, at Columbia, S.C. April 7, 2015 — (1) UConn 63, (2) Notre Dame 53, NCAA championship, at Tampa, Fla. Feb. 9, 2015 — (2) UConn 87, (1) South Carolina 62, at Storrs, Conn. April 8, 2014 — (1) UConn 79, (2) Notre Dame 58, NCAA championship, at Nashville, Tenn. Dec. 17, 2013 — (1) UConn 83, (2) Duke 61, at Durham, N.C. Dec. 29, 2012 — (2) UConn 61, (1) Stanford...
    Almost 12 years ago, Nikki Goeser's world was shattered when Hank Wise, a man who had been stalking her, fatally shot her husband Ben inside a crowded Tennessee restaurant. Yet, his subsequent conviction for second-degree murder in Davidson County Criminal Court hasn't squashed her anxiety. According to Goeser, Wise has continued to send sordid love letters to her from behind bars while for years being touted by prison officials for his "good behavior." "For 11 years, I have tried as best as I can to piece my shattered life together and try to get back to some kind of relative normalcy. But Hank Wise wasn't finished tormenting me," she told Fox News.  In October 2019, Goeser learned that Wise had for years been sending her letters from prison, mailing them to her former attorney who had represented her in her wrongful death suit against him.  "He had sent Valentine's Day and Christmas cards. He had...
    Actors who found success on multiple TV shows Classic cars that made a comeback An ANWA invitation is iconic: For Kate Smith its a framer and for Kaitlyn Papp, a keepsake Kate Smith’s spirits were low on Nov. 15 as she started the drive home from a tournament in Waco, Texas, where she felt like she’d “played terribly.” On the way home, she got an email from Augusta National indicating she was in consideration for the 2021 Augusta National Women’s Amateur. © Provided by Golfweek Kaitlyn Papp Augusta Is there a quicker mood-lifter? “I don’t really feel like Augusta National material right now,” Smith remembered thinking to herself, “but that would be nice.” Two months later, the iconic ANWA invitation was laying on her doorstep back home in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota. Smith spent the early part of this week quarantining at the University of Nebraska so she could be...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee lawmaker has been hospitalized with COVID-19 after attending a House Republican caucus meeting nearly two weeks ago. “Please pray for God’s healing for my lungs, and that he will give me strength and endurance as I battle this virus,” Rep. David Byrd of Waynesboro said in a Facebook post on Monday. Byrd, 63, was flown by helicopter over the weekend from Wayne County Hospital to Saint Thomas in Nashville, local media reported. Byrd attended the House GOP caucus meeting on Nov. 24 where the nearly 70-member group reelected legislative leaders. He also participated in a House GOP overnight retreat the weekend prior. He is at least the second lawmaker to be hospitalized after contracting the virus. Earlier this year, Republican Rep. Mike Carter of Ooltewah also was hospitalized for COVID-19. Byrd had attracted scrutiny for more than a year over allegations by three women...
    400 years after the ‘first thanksgiving,’ the tribe who fed the pilgrims continues fight for their land Heres what resources Bidens team gets now that the formal transition is underway NCAA women’s basketball teams impacted by COVID-19 include UConn, Middle Tennessee State, and Florida A&M © Provided by Awful Announcing UConn women's basketball There have been plenty of cancellations and postponements in NCAA men’s basketball ahead of its planned season start Wednesday, and NCAA women’s basketball is facing some of the same issues. One of the biggest impacts there comes from No. 3 UConn, which announced Monday night that they’ve paused team activities after positive COVID-19 tests and cancelled their first four scheduled games (including clashes with Quinnipiac and either No. 6 Mississippi State or Maine this weekend in the Mohegan Sun “Bubbleball” event, broadcast on FloHoops and ESPN platforms). Here’s more from UConn’s statement, which also knocks out...
    Meet the 51 women competing for Miss USA 2020. Miss USA The Miss USA pageant will air live on Monday night at 8 p.m. ET. The show, which is being filmed at Elvis Presley's former estate Graceland in Memphis, Tennessee, will be broadcast on FYI. Among this year's 51 contestants are one of Mariah Carey's background vocalists, a research assistant for the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, and more. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Cheslie Kryst is now the longest-serving Miss USA in the pageant's history due to the pandemic, but it's finally time to pass on the crown.  Miss USA, which was originally scheduled for spring 2020, will air live on FYI from Graceland — Elvis Presley's former estate — in Memphis, Tennessee, at 8 p.m. ET on Monday night.  As always, there's an incredible group of women competing for the title....
              A federal judge ruled a Tennessee law requiring women to wait at least 24 or 48 hours prior to abortion unconstitutional last week. The ruling impacts any aspect of the law that references mandatory waiting periods. Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery III was named the defendant in the case. Judge Bernard Friedman issued the ruling, calling abortion a “time sensitive medical procedure.” Any waiting period served as a “substantial obstacle to a woman’s choice.” According to Friedman, the law was therefore unconstitutional under the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. “Defendants have failed to show that the challenged mandatory waiting period protects fetal life or the health of women in Tennessee,” stated Friedman. “It is apparent that this waiting period unduly burdens women’s right to an abortion and is an affront to their ‘dignity and autonomy,’ ‘personhood’ and ‘destiny,’ and ‘conception of …...
    On Wednesday a federal district court struck down a 2015 Tennessee law that required a 48-hour waiting period before women can obtain an abortion. A Ronald Reagan nominee, Judge Bernard Friedman, of U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, Nashville Division, wrote that the mandatory waiting period is unconstitutional: The evidence clearly shows that almost all women are quite certain of their decisions by the time they appear for their first appointment and that they do not benefit, emotionally or otherwise, from being required to wait before undergoing the procedure. Friedman continued the law’s proponents did not show it served the purpose of “protecting fetal life or benefitting women’s mental and emotional health”: Fetal life is not protected because there is no evidence that patients who do not return to an abortion provider for the second appointment (i.e., for the procedure) fail to do so because the challenged statute...
    By Gabriella Borter (Reuters) - A U.S. federal judge on Wednesday struck down a Tennessee law requiring a 48-hour waiting period for abortions, saying it placed an unconstitutional burden on women. The law, which went into effect in 2015, required abortion providers to inform patients of the risks and wait at least 48 hours before proceeding, "to ensure that a consent for an abortion is truly informed consent." U.S. District Court Judge Bernard Freidman ruled in favor of several abortion clinics that sued the state in 2015. "The statute imposes numerous burdens that, taken together, place women's physical and psychological health and well-being at risk," Freidman wrote in the decision. "The burdens especially affect low-income women, who comprise the vast majority of those seeking an abortion." Freidman's decision was a victory for abortion rights advocates at a moment of heightened U.S. political controversy over abortion. The Center for Reproductive Rights,...
    By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday ruled that Tennessee’s 48-hour waiting period law for abortions is unconstitutional. Tennessee’s 2015 law requires women to make two trips to an abortion clinic, first for mandatory counseling and then for the abortion at least 48 hours later. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Bernard Freidman found that the law "substantially burdens women seeking an abortion in Tennessee. Friedman also found the state did not show that the law furthers its purported goals. “Women’s mental and emotional health is not benefited because the mandatory waiting period does nothing to increase the decisional certainty among women contemplating having an abortion. Further, the evidence demonstrates that at least 95% of women are certain of their decisions, post-abortion regret is uncommon, and abortion does not increase women’s risk of negative mental health outcomes,” Friedman wrote. The ruling comes more...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday ruled that Tennessee’s 48-hour waiting period law for abortions is unconstitutional. Tennessee’s 2015 law requires women to make two trips to an abortion clinic, first for mandatory counseling and then for the abortion at least 48 hours later. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Bernard Freidman found that the law “substantially burdens women seeking an abortion in Tennessee. Friedman also found the state did not show that the law furthers its purported goals. “Women’s mental and emotional health is not benefited because the mandatory waiting period does nothing to increase the decisional certainty among women contemplating having an abortion. Further, the evidence demonstrates that at least 95% of women are certain of their decisions, post-abortion regret is uncommon, and abortion does not increase women’s risk of negative mental health outcomes,” Friedman wrote. The ruling comes more than a year...
    COOKEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee judge has been publicly reprimanded for engaging in sexually explicit communications with a woman who formerly had a child custody matter before him and another woman whose law firm does business with the judge's court, among others. A letter of reprimand sent last week to Circuit Court Judge Jonathan Lee Young from the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct stated, “The messages include content ranging from flirtatious to overtly sexual. Most of these communications depict you in your judicial robe.” The communications were “sent to multiple women on various social media platforms from 2015 to 2020,” according to the letter. Young became a judge in 2014 and hears cases in Clay, Cumberland, DeKalb, Overton, Pickett, Putnam and White counties. The board found that Young's behavior violated a number of ethical standards including a prohibition on behavior that could be seen as coercive. “Engaging in sexual...
    (CNN)A cold case in Georgia has been solved.The remains of a woman found in Dade County almost 40 years ago have finally been identified. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation says her name was Patricia Parker, and GBI investigators believe she was the victim of serial killer Samuel Little.In 2018, Little told the Texas Rangers that he murdered a young Black woman in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in the early 1980s, the GBI said in a press release. Investigators from Georgia and Tennessee, according to the GBI statement, met with Little and gathered "more details that led them to believe the remains found in Dade County were the woman Little had taken in Chattanooga and killed in Georgia."Last year, the GBI unveiled a forensic reconstruction of the woman's skull and asked for the public's help in identifying her. A family came forward, the GBI added, and DNA samples obtained from them positively identified...
    A woman in Tennessee is opening up about an experience of body-shaming at a local gym, during which an employee informed her that she’d have to leave the facility if she didn’t wear a shirt over her sports bra. Julia Maren first shared her story on Instagram earlier in September, blasting the establishment for contributing to a culture of “double standards and sexism.” “So you’re telling me that because three inches of my waist is exposed that I’m not welcome in the gym but meanwhile … Chad is over there with a cutout that shows his whole nipple?” she wrote in the post. “Got it. Thank you for taking time out of your day to let me know that double standards and sexism still exist.”           View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by...
    U.S. District Judge William L. Campbell, Jr. issued a ruling Tuesday temporarily blocking a section of a new Tennessee abortion law that required doctors to share disputed information about abortions two days before it was to go into effect, saying the section could potentially violate the First Amendment. In July, Republican Gov. Bill Lee signed in new laws to limit abortions. As part of the package, abortion clinics would be required to post signs in the waiting areas and patient rooms that said it might be possible to reverse a chemical abortion. Failure could result in a $10,000 fine for the clinic, according to the Tennessean. Abortion activists sued, arguing the rule violates doctors First Amendment rights “by compelling them to engage in speech that is untruthful and misleading,” according to the ruling. Campbell agreed, writing that the law could be a violation of the First Amendment. “Section 39-15-218 violates...
    By KIMBERLEE KRUESI, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal judge has blocked a Tennessee law that required women undergoing drug-induced abortions be informed the procedure could be reversed. The statute was about to go into effect Wednesday after the GOP-dominant General Assembly advanced a sweeping anti-abortion measure earlier this year. The law included not only the so-called “abortion reversal” provision, but also a ban on abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected — about six weeks into pregnancy, before many women know they are pregnant. Both portions of that statute are now blocked from being implemented as these legal cases make their way through court. Under the Tennessee law, doctors would be required to inform women that drug-induced abortions may be halted halfway. Medical groups say the claim is nat backed up by science and there is little information about the reversal procedure’s safety. Those who failed to...
    A Tennessee woman has slammed her gym for promoting sexism and double standards after they told her to cover up the 'three inches' of waist she had exposed while exercising. Julia Maren, who is a member at Anytime Fitness Spring Hill, shared a furious Instagram post on September 8 after gym staff took issue with her sports bra, telling her she would need to put on a shirt to continue her workout. She went on to complain that men at the gym were exposing much more than she was, decrying the unfairness of women being judged and criticized for what they wear to the gym.   Called out: Julia Maren, who is a member at Anytime Fitness Spring Hill in Tennessee, went on an Instagram rant about her gym Cover up: She said gym staff took issue with her sports bra, telling her she would...
    By KIMBERLEE KRUESI, Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee law requiring doctors to inform women that drug-induced abortions may be reversed is critical for women who may change their minds halfway through the procedure, the state's top legal chief said. Last month, abortion rights groups filed a lawsuit arguing the newly approved statute violated several constitutional rights because it not only illegally singled out abortion patients and physicians who provide the procedure, but also forced doctors to relay a “controversial government-mandated message.” The complaint specifically seeks to block the law before it goes into effect on Oct. 1 as the groups pursue their legal battle. However, Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery's office has since responded by citing several women who say they wanted more information about their options when they underwent the procedure. “Here, the challenged law does not hinder patients from obtaining an abortion. Instead, it merely...
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee law requiring doctors to inform women that drug-induced abortions may be reversed is critical for women who may change their minds halfway through the procedure, the state’s top legal chief said. Last month, abortion rights groups filed a lawsuit arguing the newly approved statute violated several constitutional rights because it not only illegally singled out abortion patients and physicians who provide the procedure, but also forced doctors to relay a “controversial government-mandated message.” The complaint specifically seeks to block the law before it goes into effect on Oct. 1 as the groups pursue their legal battle. However, Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery’s office has since responded by citing several women who say they wanted more information about their options when they underwent the procedure. “Here, the challenged law does not hinder patients from obtaining an abortion. Instead, it merely provides patients with additional...
    This story is part of Prism’s series on incarceration as gendered violence. Read the rest of the series here.  By Briana Perry  Jails and prisons were designed as sites of reproductive coercion. Women’s divergence from what is narrowly considered appropriate gender performance under patriarchy, particularly around sex and reproduction, has been the foundational basis for their “criminality.” Early on, incarcerated women had to participate in reeducation to cure their deviant behavior. As Angela Davis explains in Are Prisons Obsolete?, for middle-class white women, the goal was to produce more obedient and nurturing wives and mothers. For Black and poor women, it was to produce skilled domestic servants and enable the cheap reproduction of the labor force. In line with this logic, since the first women’s prison opened in the U.S. in 1873, incarcerated women—and particularly Black women—have experienced a multitude of sexual and reproductive abuses. This has included non-consensual sterilization,...
    Tennessee State Rep. John DeBerry, a longtime Democrat who has represented Memphis for 26 years, unloaded on violent rioters who are burning cities down across the U.S. and also took a shot at people who are “too frightened to stand up and protect our own stuff.” DeBerry told Fox News that he’s “appalled” when people try to compare Black Lives Matter to the civil rights movement, saying “there is absolutely no comparison.” DeBerry, during an impassioned speech at the Tennessee House of Representatives, gave the following remarks earlier this month: I rise because I continue to hear references to what I saw in growing up in this country and growing up in the state of Tennessee as I walked with my father and worked with my father here in the state of Tennessee and Memphis, Tennessee, and across this state and across this country in the middle of what has...
    BROWNSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center is displaying two new exhibits about the fight for women's voting rights on the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. The new exhibits, “To Make Our Voices Heard: Tennessee Women’s Fight for the Vote,” and “Rightfully Hers,” will be on display from Tuesday through Oct. 18, the center said in a statement. Adriana Dunn, curator of the Brownsville museum, said the exhibits “remind us of the tribulation and eventual triumph women experienced in order to obtain equal rights to vote.” The anniversary of the ratification of the amendment that granted women the right to vote was Tuesday. The heritage center educates visitors about the history of cotton, the Hatchie River and musicians who call West Tennessee home. Tina Turner's former school and the last home of blues music pioneer Sleepy John Estes are located at the center. Both were moved...
    Missouri Democratic congressional candidate Cori Bush leads protesters as they take to the street to protest against police brutality on June 12, 2020. Any celebration or recognition of the centennial anniversary of the 19th Amendment must include the role of Black women in the battle for universal suffrage as well as the ongoing work of Black women in contemporary political spaces. Often touted as giving women the right to vote, the 19th Amendment’s passage did not overcome the various barriers put in place to deny and limit the electoral participation of Black people. Many states in the South and West prohibited Black people from voting through various means, such as poll taxes and literacy tests. It would not be until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, commemorated earlier this month, that Black women would be able to fully enjoy access to the franchise. Still, this has...
    SAN ANTONIO – If you took a stroll along the San Antonio River Walk on Sunday, you may have noticed some white ribbons wrapped along the trees. Those are placed to honor women gaining the right to vote in 1920. The San Antonio 19th Amendment Centennial Committee is hosting a series of events with support from the city that celebrates these voting rights. More events similar to this one are planned, beginning Tuesday, Aug. 18 to Aug. 26. Organizers said it’s all about celebrating the history of voting. Tennessee passed the amendment on Aug. 18, but it wasn’t until Aug. 26 that Congress certified the results. RELATED: Heeding mom, Tennessee lawmaker helped women gain the vote Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.
    One hundred years ago this month, women in the United States were guaranteed the right to vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment — secured by a 24-year-old Tennessee legislator’s decisive vote, cast at the bidding of his mother. Harry T. Burn’s surprise move set the stage for decades of slow but steady advances for American women in electoral politics. Two years ago, a record number of women were elected to Congress. On Tuesday, Democratic former Vice President Joe Biden selected Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate — making her the first Black woman on a major party’s presidential ticket. Burns, from the small town of Niota in eastern Tennessee, joined the Legislature in 1918 as its youngest member. The following year, Congress approved the 19th Amendment, touching off the battle to win ratification by the legislatures of 36 of the 48 states. The process moved quickly at first:...
    By DAVID CRARY, AP National Writer One hundred years ago this month, women in the United States were guaranteed the right to vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment — secured by a 24-year-old Tennessee legislator's decisive vote, cast at the bidding of his mother. Harry T. Burn's surprise move set the stage for decades of slow but steady advances for American women in electoral politics. Two years ago, a record number of women were elected to Congress. On Tuesday, Democratic former Vice President Joe Biden selected Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate — making her the first Black woman on a major party’s presidential ticket. Burns, from the small town of Niota in eastern Tennessee, joined the Legislature in 1918 as its youngest member. The following year, Congress approved the 19th Amendment, touching off the battle to win ratification by the legislatures of 36 of the 48 states....
    By The Associated Press Recent editorials from Tennessee newspapers: ___ Aug. 10 The Johnson City Press on a woman representing the 1st Congressional District’s seat in the U.S. House of Representatives: A significant step in local history largely escaped notice Thursday night as the excitement wrapped up in the bitter contest to replace Phil Roe in Congress. For the first time, both major party nominees for the 1st Congressional District’s seat in the U.S. House of Representatives are women, all but guaranteeing a woman will take the oath of office in January. Since Irishman John Rhea won election in 1805 after Tennessee’s at-large district was reapportioned, the seat has been occupied by men. That is with the sole exception of May 1961 to January 1963 when Louise Reece completed the term of her late husband, B. Carroll Reece. Since 1881, the 1st District has been represented by Republicans. So we...
              Former Tennessee congressman Zach Wamp, who recently endorsed U.S. Senate candidate Manny Sethi, on Saturday posted — and deleted — a tweet accusing Sethi’s opponent, Bill Hagerty, of using young female volunteers “in short shorts” to attract votes. U.S. Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), upon reading Wamp’s tweet, reprimanded the former congressman and suggested he doesn’t respect women. Note to @ZachWamp: now we know what you think of young conservative women who show up to campaign and be involved in the political process. It’s disgraceful that in 2020 conservative women are still fighting such bias. https://t.co/R8xUbUwT9E — Marsha Blackburn (@VoteMarsha) August 2, 2020 “Note to @ZachWamp: now we know what you think of young conservative women who show up to campaign and be involved in the political process,” Blackburn tweeted. “It’s disgraceful that in 2020 conservative women are still fighting such bias.” This started...
    A woman wears a shirt in support of Planned Parenthood during a pro-life rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Center. As pro-choice advocates in Louisiana breathe a sigh of relief after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the June Medical Services v. Russo case last week, Tennessee is gearing up for a fight against one of the most restrictive anti-abortion bills in the country—one that advocates say targets people of color. Used as a bargaining chip while negotiating the state budget, the bill was passed in the early morning hours of June 19 when the Tennessee Senate made a last-minute deal with the state House to pass a six-week abortion ban, which is unconstitutional because it makes it medically and logistically impossible for most people to determine that they are pregnant and arrange for abortion care. In a statement, Rebecca Terrell, executive director of CHOICES, said Tennessee...
    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee convict serving prison time for a 2001 rape has been charged with killing two women later that year, prosecutors said. A Shelby County grand jury has indicted Thomas Maupin, 70, on murder charges in the deaths of two women whose bodies were found in a remote area of Memphis in 2001. Maupin is currently serving an eight-year prison sentence after pleading guilty in 2017 to stabbing and raping another woman in Memphis, also in 2001. Dentures collected by investigators in that case had been placed in a police property room with a sexual assault kit, including DNA evidence. But the rape kit evidence became part of a heavy backlog and wasn't tested until 2016, prosecutors said Tuesday. Evidence from the rape investigation led to the reopening of the two murder cases, prosecutors said. Maupin also served 12 years in prison in Washington for the...
    By Gabriella Borter | Reuters Tennessee lawmakers passed one of the tightest abortion restrictions in the country on Friday, banning the procedure once a fetal heartbeat is detected at around six weeks, which is often before a woman realizes she is pregnant. The “heartbeat” bill follows a wave of similar strict anti-abortion measures passed by Republican-majority legislatures in an effort to prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 case that guarantees a woman’s constitutional right to abortion. In the last two years, federal judges have struck down “fetal heartbeat” laws banning abortion after six weeks in several states on the grounds that they were unconstitutional. Tennessee Governor Bill Lee, a Republican, applauded the passage of the bill, saying in a Twitter post on Friday it is “the strongest pro-life law in our state’s history.” The governor must sign the legislation for it to take...
    A Middle Tennessee deputy is thanking two women who paid for his breakfast Tuesday morning - and the note they left is making an impression. Sumner County Patrol Deputy Jody McDowell said only a few minutes after receiving his meal at Cracker Barrel, his waitress said "I was told to give this to you" and handed over a note. The note reads: “BLM But so does yours. Thank you for your service. Breakfast paid.” CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP McDowell said two African American women who were sitting in the dining area got up to leave, but wanted to stop over at his table and thanked him for his service before they headed back to Baltimore. McDowell doesn't know the women's names, but told them he appreciated the kind gesture. Click for more from Fox 17 Nashville.
    A Tennessee Karen apartment complex employee got “fired” after assuming a Black resident did not have permission to the swimming pool, The Atlanta Black Star reported. On Tuesday at the Knox Ridge Apartments in Knoxville, a Black resident and two her friends were prohibited from using the swimming pool by a white employee who stood by the doorway. Both of the Black residents and white employee names are not public, but one of the Black women filmed a series of herself arguing to a white employee whose face is visible. READ MORE: White women say calling them ‘Karen’ is a slur, Black Twitter sounds off    Me and my friends were just racially profiled at KnoxRidge pool. Don’t go there. This woman automatically assumed that we didn’t live there and stopped us before we could go inside. But she continued to let in other white residents. pic.twitter.com/8IXBfOTR2i — E
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