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    Pentagon authorizes more troops to assist with vaccine effort As impeachment trial ends, GOP senators face big decision 66% of Retirees Spend This Much on Health Care As we age, the need for health care services rises. And millions of Americans depend on their Social Security benefit to cover the cost of such care. © Alexander Raths / Shutterstock.com About two-thirds of retirees — 66% — spend more than $375 a month on health care costs, a recent survey by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL) found. That amount is equivalent to roughly one-quarter of the average Social Security benefit of $1,523 per month, TSCL reports. In addition, 31% of retirees surveyed spend more than $1,000 monthly on health costs, which is about two-thirds of the average Social Security benefit. It's not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter. TSCL notes that spending...
    GOP senator: Democrats care too much about punishing Trump for getting people killed
    After House impeachment managers played that emotional and compelling video of the Capitol riot on Tuesday, Fox News’ Martha MacCallum tweeted, “Methinks they could have showed that video and said. ‘The Prosecution rests.’ But brevity is rarely the Congressional way…” Indeed, it was a mic-drop moment. The video was devastating. A part of me thinks the prosecution should simply show it on a loop. This would have the benefit of reminding open-minded viewers what the trial is really about, and also torturing Republicans who have decided to acquit no matter what. Having made the case for Trump’s culpability with footage, Reps. Jamie Raskin and Joe Neguse then made the constitutional case for conviction, preemptively rebutting team Trump’s predictable arguments, citing legal scholars, clearly establishing that a president can be impeached after leaving office, and showing how anything else would essentially give a lame-duck president a get-out-of-jail-free card. Rep. Raskin also...
    By Matthew Geagan, CBS Boston BOSTON (CBS) — Marcus Smart hears the critics who think he shoots too much. And Marcus Smart doesn’t care what they think. The feisty Celtics guard is never afraid to put up a shot, and though he wasn’t seen as a three-point shooter when he entered the NBA, he hasn’t been timid from behind the arc over the last seven years. It has certainly led to some frustrating evenings for Celtics fans, but overall, Smart hasn’t made people want to pull their hair out as much as usual over the first 16 games of the season. But that’s just part of the total package with Marcus Smart. If you love him for his defense and all-in attitude, you have to live with his shot selection. And he is kinda living up to his promise to take better shots this season, though it hasn’t been an...
    Ford extends 3-day surge to 23% as Rivians big capital raise boosts the companys electric-car prospects TOMS Racing Whips Toyota GR Yaris Into an Even Angrier Frenzy These $19k SUVs Will Make You Trade in Your Car Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/6 SLIDES © Provided by Eat This, Not That! What Happens to Your Body When You Take Too Much Vitamin D Right now, vitamin D is hot as many doctors, registered dietitians, and other health experts are saying it could lessen the severity of COVID-19 symptoms. Why? The vitamin is known to help support the immune system by decreasing inflammation in the body caused by the virus. However, Ali Webster, PhD, RD, Director of Research and Nutrition Communications, International Food Information Council, points out that vitamin D may not be the end all...
    OPINION Bloomberg Changes to WhatsApp’s privacy policy will have no repercussions for Facebook, the social media giant. After all, these things happen often. Last week, a furor was sparked around WhatsApp. The new terms of service that seemed to suggest that the encrypted messaging app would start sharing a lot more data with Facebook, its parent company, drove users crazy. Elon Musk even suggested to his 42 million Twitter followers that they use a rival service, Signal. How important will this be to Facebook? Very little. People spent the same amount of time on WhatsApp last week as they did before the new terms of use were announced, according to app analytics company Apptopia. And this kind of thing is repeated every certain amount of time. Facebook makes changes to make more money with its services, which span WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger, and as a consequence, a large number...
    (CNN)"How is one girl accusing a guy about a phone a crime?" Elliot Williams It's not. But the question, posed by Miya Ponsetto in a rambling CBS "This Morning" interview, which aired in two parts last week and on Monday, offers a window into the ways Black people -- even children -- still have to fight for our humanity every day. Ms. Ponsetto, 22, falsely accused 14-year-old Keyon Harrold Jr. of stealing her iPhone in a New York City boutique hotel lobby in December. The teenager's father, a Black jazz musician, captured the confrontation in a cell phone video that went viral, and security footage from the hotel showed Ponsetto trying to tackle the teenager. Last week, according to a Ventura County Sheriff's Office news release, Ponsetto was arrested in California on a "fugitive warrant in connection with a recent assault at a New York City hotel." She has...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — So many people wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for the tireless work by our health care workers, working days on end, putting their own safety and that of their families at risk. CBS 2’s Steven Graves reports on their stories. When you talk to these health care heroes, many quickly bring up the vaccine, and how thankful they are for it. But they’re keeping a close eye on dealing with mental health. Almost a year into the pandemic, the battle against COVID-19 is just habit now for Chicago doctors like infectious disease specialist Lisa Russell. “Just working day in and day out,” Russell said, adding that taking the time to digest the statistic of one million cases in Illinois is mind boggling. “(It) is astonishing and it’s difficult to put into words and think about the impact this has had.” She has broken down. “I mean,...
    Employee intentionally removed COVID-19 vaccine from fridge, ruining more than 500 doses, hospital says; FBI investigating VIRUS TODAY: Vaccinations off to slower than expected start The 20 fastest-growing jobs in 2020—and how much they pay The coronavirus pandemic changed the way nearly everyone lived and worked in 2020, and a number of jobs saw skyrocketing demand to meet new and urgent needs brought on by Covid-19. © Provided by CNBC The salary comparison site PayScale recently analyzed crowdsourced data from 4.33 million people to find the jobs that saw the highest share of growth in 2020 compared with the year prior. Not surprisingly, the rankings include a number of roles that filled unprecedented health care, transportation, tech and essential service needs during months of illness and social distancing. The fastest-growing job in 2020 was health screeners, a group of workers that grew by 136% compared with 2019, as state...
    High school junior Cassandra, 16, does homework from a remote learning class on October 07, 2020 in Phoenix, Arizona. The straight-A student's family had narrowly escaped eviction from their RV park earlier in the day. "The trauma and losses kids have been facing is pretty immense," says Urban Institute senior fellow Gina Adams. "We may not see it yet, but this is our future workforce."John Moore | Getty Images News | Getty Images As lawmakers in Washington, D.C. race to finalize a $900 billion Covid-19 relief package on Sunday that would include another round of stimulus checks, additional unemployment benefits, and food and rent relief for millions of Americans, there is one economic challenge that won't be solved: the income inequality compounded by the pandemic that has hit working parents at lower income levels with the highest levels of stress. In the tenth month of a nation under the grip...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — For residents of nursing homes, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel in the form of a coronavirus vaccine now being distributed across Illinois and the rest of the nation. First they have to get through a long, dark, lonely winter; but there’s a ray of sunshine first at one memory care facility in the western burbs. CBS 2 Morning Insider Lauren Victory unwraps the holiday surprise. They say eyes are the window to the soul, and at this window in time, 90-year-old memory care patient Dorothy can see her daughter, but may not understand why glass separates them. “I live very close. I would come in a couple times; two, three times a week” said her daughter, Maria Wachholz. The virus put a halt to those frequent indoor visits at Terra Vista in Oakbrook Terrace. So to bring their love from inside outside, each...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Some health care workers say hospital capacity is worse now than they’ve ever seen it, and their biggest fear is having to turn patients away. “It’s not we have ever seen before,” said Dr. Mariam Torossian, a pulmonary critical care doctor at Providence Saint Joseph Hospital in Burbank. “These are certainly unprecedented times. This is the largest and most aggressive surge we’ve seen. It’s far beyond anything we’ve seen even in the beginning.” Over at USC Medical Center, the largest coronavirus ward in Southern California, health care workers have been frantically working to try to save as many people as possible who are suffering from COVID-19 complications. ICU beds at Providence Saint Joseph are full and now that hospital has had to utilize makeshift beds in other areas of the hospital. Dr. Torossian says about 80% of people who get infected with coronavirus will be okay,...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — More than 1,500 people were being treated for COVID-19 in Maryland hospitals Wednesday, and while the number fell slightly, a number of hospitals across the state are gearing up for a new wave of patients. The surge started around two weeks ago. During that time, Gov. Larry Hogan said hospitalizations have increased by 51%. Of the 1,578 people hospitalized with the virus in the state on Wednesday, 1,219 were in acute care and 359 were in intensive care. MedStar Franklin Square Hospital in Baltimore County is treating around 100 patients with COVID-19, some of the highest numbers in the county and statewide. “We are handling this surge very aggressively,” said Dr. Mimi Novell, the hospital’s chief medical officer. Novell said the hospital is working hard to manage its capacity and help patients move through more efficiently. One example might be expediting a certain test. “We have different...
    Covid vaccines should go first to health care workers, long term care facility residents committee decides Justice Department investigating a secret lobbying scheme to obtain presidential pardon Seniors On Medicare Are Getting a Big Pay Day in 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/6 SLIDES © Stephen Lam / Getty Images Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has a net worth of $100.6 billion as of Nov. 30, according to Forbes. He’s currently the fourth-richest American and the seventh-richest person in the world, thanks to the success of his social networking site. Read More: How Facebook Weathered Its Scandalous Year See how he became one of the world’s richest billionaires. Last updated: Dec. 1, 2020
    (CNN)The fate of the Affordable Care Act lies in the Supreme Court's hands, and there's not much President-elect Joe Biden can do about it.The justices will hear oral arguments Tuesday in the case that seeks to overturn the landmark health reform law. They will likely take initial votes at their private Friday conference and begin the process of writing opinions, though a decision isn't expected until the first half of 2021.In a near-unprecedented step, the Trump administration is not defending the law, instead arguing that it should be declared unconstitutional. By the time Biden takes office on January 20, it may be too late for his administration to have much influence on the court's decision. Plus, the case will continue even if Biden switches sides and starts backing the Affordable Care Act since the original lawsuit was brought by a coalition of Republican state attorneys general."The Biden administration's options are...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Supreme Court weighs the fate of “Obamacare” on Tuesday, arguments will revolve around arcane points of law like severability — whether the justices can surgically snip out part of the law and leave the rest. But what’s at stake has real-world consequences for just about every American, as well as the health care industry, a major source of jobs and tax revenues. Whether the Affordable Care Act stays, goes, or is significantly changed, will affect the way life is lived in the U.S. The argument against the law from the Trump administration and conservative states is that the 10-year-old statute was rendered unconstitutional in its entirety when Congress dialed down to zero a penalty on those remaining uninsured. The court has shifted solidly to the political right under President Donald Trump. Here’s a look at some of what’s at stake if the opponents of the...
    President Trump is making a "mistake" if he focuses on the Hunter Biden laptop story on the campaign trail and at the next presidential debate, Fox News contributor Mike Huckabee said on Wednesday. "Yeah, it is a mistake because the average person doesn't understand it, it is too complicated, and, frankly, it doesn't matter to them," Huckabee said in response to "Fox & Friends" host Brian Kilmeade, who asked whether Trump should emphasize the story in the campaign's closing days. "They care about their health care costs, they care about their taxes, they care about safety and their neighborhood on their block and in their yard. Focus on that and he wins the election by a landslide," Huckabee suggested. HOW TO WATCH THE FINAL PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE Huckabee's comments came after Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said on Monday that in this week's debate the president will bring up allegations that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden met with a Ukrainian business...
    Short circuit SO much for Sir Keir Starmer forensically “following the science”. What now? England’s deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam says a national “circuit breaker” lockdown would be wrong. 3Sir Keir Starmer has demanded a national 'circuit breaker' lockdownCredit: Getty Images - Getty What a blow for Labour and the Left, for whom supporting a draconian new shutdown is an article of faith. A week ago we said Starmer had backed the wrong horse. It has fallen at the first. Anyone can see Covid has flared up in certain specific areas and barely at all in others. Lockdowns are not only ruinous, they are themselves fatal. Why impose another now on the whole country? Those still clamouring to do so should read the heartbreaking words of grieving Andrew Jenkinson today. His wife Emma, mum to four young kids, died of cancer after the first lockdown ­cancelled her chemo...
    By Matthew Geagan, CBS Boston BOSTON (CBS) — Let’s just get this out of the way. The Celtics were a terrible basketball team in Game 4, and now they’re facing elimination because of their lack of effort in a must-win game. That’s a bit disheartening. Boston will hopefully be a lot less terrible for Game 5 on Friday night, knowing that if they continue to play terribly, their playoff run will come to an end and they’ll be exiled from the NBA bubble in Orlando. The Celtics played against two teams in Game 4: Miami and themselves. What was surprising is that despite all their turnovers, despite their best player being in a freezer to start the game, and despite their disjointed offensive attack, the Celtics still had a chance in the fourth quarter. Miami really wasn’t that much better than Boston, but they were a shade less terrible. That...
    A 54-year-old man has died due to overconsumption of a candy - black licorice. The man, a Massachusetts resident, ate a bag and a half of the candies every day for two weeks prior to his death, the New York Post is reporting. Licorice contains the sweetener glycyyhizic acid, which can deplete a person’s potassium levels and contribute to heart problems, high blood pressure, edema, and lethargy, doctors said in a New England Journal of Medicine article that came out Wednesday, Sept. 23. When the man died - he collapsed inside a fast food restaurant - doctors said he had extremely low potassium levels, which led to heart rhythm problems. The FDA actually has a warning out for black licorice - the red kind is okay. If you are age 40 or older, eating 2 ounces of black licorice a day for at least two weeks could land you...
    A Massachusetts man has died due to overconsumption of a candy - black licorice. The man ate a bag and a half of the candies every day for two weeks prior to his death, the New York Post is reporting. Licorice contains the sweetener glycyyhizic acid, which can deplete a person’s potassium levels and contribute to heart problems, high blood pressure, edema, and lethargy, doctors said in a New England Journal of Medicine article that came out Wednesday, Sept. 23. When the man died - he collapsed inside a fast food restaurant - doctors said he had extremely low potassium levels, which led to heart rhythm problems. The FDA actually has a warning out for black licorice - the red kind is okay. If you are age 40 or older, eating 2 ounces of black licorice a day for at least two weeks could land you in...
    EVERY morning Chloe Cunningham, 31, joins millions of others in logging onto Stacey Soloman and Mrs Hinch's Instagram accounts, desperate to see what cleaning hacks the women have shared overnight. Chloe, from Bexleyheath, south London, is a self-confessed 'cleaning obsessive' who scrubs her house from top to bottom for up to FIVE hours a day. 8Chloe is a self-confessed cleaning addictCredit: Supplied Her husband Levi, who she married in August last year, even moans she doesn't spend enough time with him because she is always cleaning. And mates have said she should spend less time worrying about whether her shower has scum on it and more time 'making memories'. But Chloe thinks cleaning helps her anxiety and is nothing more dangerous than a hobby. Now Chloe, who works in education, shares her story with Fabulous: 8Chloe's super neat bedroomCredit: nowandforeverhome/Instagram I’VE always been a neat person - even...
    The main fear is that a bad flu season will coincide with a second wave of COVID-19 As fall approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, concerns are mounting about what a seasonal flu season will look like to coincide with the COVID-19 pandemic. The great fear is that it matches a really bad flu season and a second wave of coronavirus, and what will be the impact of this on health systems. And it is that how bad the winter will be not only depends on the coronavirus, but on what happens with all other winter viruses, and also on their own behavior and the success or failure of government policies. Much of the effort is now focused on contain the contagions ofl new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in places like the United States (with the highest number of cases in the world), Mexico, and several European countries that...
    BP logo.Beata Zawrzel/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.This piece was originally published in Grist and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. If only there were an app that would let you track your personal carbon footprint in real-time, like a FitBit. You could watch the weight of your emissions grow as you drove to the store, took a bus to the park, or rode the train around town. As the number ballooned, the app would prompt you to assuage your guilt by buying carbon offsets—helping programs that promote biogas in Indonesia, cleaner cookstoves in Mexico, and tree-planting in the United Kingdom. Now imagine that app was funded by an oil company. That’s the real-life story of VYVE (rhymes with “five”), one of a handful of new carbon-tracking apps. It’s backed by a subsidiary of BP called Launchpad, a venture capital-like group...
    The squirrel, despite its cute appearance, it is not the best animal you can have at home as a pet. Perhaps you have weighed the situation very well and are very determined to adopt one, but if not and you realize that yours really is a whim, you should know that this animal not especially sociable with people (They do not like to be handled or caressed as if it were a dog or a cat) and that they do not live well with other members of the animal world. We are talking about a fragile animal that is not recommended in homes with children and whose care is more laborious than that of other pets. If you are not clear about it or there are already animals at home, it is better to dismiss the idea. Think that later you can back down and abandon...
    A 65-year-old couple retiring this year should expect to spend about $295,000 on health care costs alone in retirement — but quite frankly, that estimate is conservative. The figure, calculated by Fidelity Investments as part of its annual Health Care Cost Estimate, includes Medicare Part A, Part B and Part D premiums and deductibles, but it does not include over-the-counter medications, vitamin supplements and glasses. Long-term care insurance is also not included, which on its own could be an additional thousands of dollars a month. (Fidelity also didn’t take COVID-19 or related costs into account when modeling its health care cost estimates.) 80% of older Americans can't afford to retire - COVID-19 isn't helping Long-term care insurance covers the expenses the elderly may face when they’re no longer able to conduct certain regular activities (such as bathing or feeding) or when they need to live in a nursing home...
    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis expressed confidence Tuesday the state has weathered the worst of the resurgent COVID-19 outbreak and has ample hospital bed capacity to handle whatever comes its way. “The trend is much better today than it was two weeks ago,” DeSantis said Tuesday during a roundtable with hospital representatives in Tallahassee. “I am confident the folks in our hospital systems will continue to do a great job and meet the demand. There’s a lot of anxiety and fear out there. I think we are going to be able to get through it. We are not there yet.” Hospital and public health professionals, while reservedly supportive of the governor’s optimism, said their greatest concern isn’t intensive care unit (ICU) bed capacity, but it's manpower shortages and strain on doctors and nurses, especially in South Florida. “Our people are getting tired,” Memorial Healthcare System Chief Medical Officer...
    Sometimes, it comes as a surprise to older folks that Medicare is not free. Depending on the specifics of your coverage and how often you use the health-care system, your out-of-pocket costs could reach well into six-figure territory over the course of your retirement, according to a recent report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute. To cover premiums and out-of-pocket prescription drug costs from age 65 on, you might need $130,000 if you're a man, according to the study. For a woman, it's $146,000. EMTs Daniel Kiga (L) and Stephanee Richards transfer a patient out of the acute care COVID unit at Harborview Medical Center on May 7, 2020 in Seattle, Washington.Karen Ducey | Getty Images"Some are surprised that after working for decades and paying Medicare taxes, they still have to shell out money," said Elizabeth Gavino, founder of Lewin & Gavino in New York and an independent broker and general...
    Target is planning to permanently offer employees an increased hourly wage and additional benefits in appreciation of their work during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The company announced this week that as of July 5, starting hourly wages will be bumped to $15, and employees will also receive a one-time $200 “recognition bonus” for both full and part-type associates that worked during the outbreak. Brian Cornell, Chairman, and CEO of Target made note that the $15 starting wage is 25 percent higher than the industry average nationwide. “In the best of times, our team brings incredible energy and empathy to our work, and in harder times they bring those qualities plus extraordinary resilience and agility to keep Target on the forefront of meeting the changing needs of our guests and our business year after year,” he said. “Everything we aspire to do and be as a company builds on...
    (CNN)Child care is so scarce in Kate Littlefield's Vermont community that she joined a wait-list when she was six weeks pregnant. It wasn't soon enough to find a placement for her infant twins after they were born. "We couldn't get in until they were 8 months old," she said. "That was the earliest spot we could get, and we called every child care center in my area." With local child care centers now closed due to the pandemic, Littlefield's 17-month-old babies have been back at home, where she and her husband are working remotely. "My kids are coming to meetings with me, which is awful," said Littlefield, a school services clinician at the nonprofit Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont. "Two babies crawling all over your body — while you're trying to be professional and trying to pay attention to what people are telling you — is not manageable." At the...
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