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China’s censorship:

    Reuters February 24, 2021 0 Comments A bipartisan group of U.S. senators will revive legislation as soon as Wednesday to counter Chinese censorship in the United States, a new effort by Congress to hold Beijing accountable for its growing efforts to stifle criticism beyond its borders, Senator Jeff Merkley told Reuters. U.S. officials have complained that the Chinese government has increasingly sought to suppress opposition to its ruling Communist Party by coercing U.S. companies – from hotel chains and airlines to Hollywood film producers – to take pro-Beijing stances. “We must monitor and address the impacts of China’s censorship and intimidation of Americans and our companies, so we can create a strategy to safeguard this bedrock freedom and hold those accountable who suppress and destroy it,” Merkley, a Democrat leading the effort who will soon be chair of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, said in emailed comments. The bill...
    By Michael Martina WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A bipartisan group of U.S. senators will revive legislation as soon as Wednesday to counter Chinese censorship in the United States, a new effort by Congress to hold Beijing accountable for its growing efforts to stifle criticism beyond its borders, Senator Jeff Merkley told Reuters. U.S. officials have complained that the Chinese government has increasingly sought to suppress opposition to its ruling Communist Party by coercing U.S. companies – from hotel chains and airlines to Hollywood film producers – to take pro-Beijing stances. "We must monitor and address the impacts of China's censorship and intimidation of Americans and our companies, so we can create a strategy to safeguard this bedrock freedom and hold those accountable who suppress and destroy it," Merkley, a Democrat leading the effort who will soon be chair of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, said in emailed comments. The bill is...
    China's recent announcement that BBC World News is banned from broadcasting in the country is another troubling example of Beijing closing itself off and makes clear the extent of the Communist Party's censorship regime, author Gordon Chang says. The authoritarian government's National Radio and Television Administration announced its restriction of the British broadcaster on Feb. 11, claiming the BBC had harmed Chinese "unity" with its reporting on the country's atrocities against ethnic minorities. "China under Xi Jinping has been shutting out the rest of the world. It’s basically a closing of the Chinese mind because Xi does not like foreign influences," Chang told Fox News. "As China cuts itself off from the rest of the world, it’s not going to get the benefit of communicating with other people. Everyone benefits from talking with others, and societies that cut themselves off end up usually strangling themselves." China was formally accused by the U.S. last month of perpetrating a genocide against Uighurs and...
    For many years, there has long been a debate about whether Chinese-owned tech companies are controlled by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and whether they have undue influence over consumers in the U.S. and elsewhere. Now a whistleblower has spoken out alleging the parent company of TikTok is beholden to the CCP. The allegations stem from an employee of ByteDance, who has alleged that he was told to often delete content related to the COVID-19 outbreak in its earliest days, as well as other content that was deemed controversial by the Chinese state. POMPEO WARNS OF POTENTIAL RESTRICTION OF CHINESE TIKTOK APP; US USERS MAY BE CEDING INFO TO 'CHINESE COMMUNISTS' He claims that the Chinese government has been using TikTok to suppress minorities, censor freedom of speech and mask human rights violations, demanding the company create algorithms that identify minority Uighur-language posts that would then automatically be censored or deleted – as well...
    Pro-democracy Hong Kongers are reportedly changing their Twitter avatars to signal support for outgoing U.S. President Donald Trump and protest Trump getting banned from the platform. Many of these Hong Kong Twitter users found uncomfortable parallels between Twitter’s ban on Trump and the way their own speech and political activism has been ruthlessly criminalized and suppressed by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Many Hong Kong netizens show solidarity with President Trump by changing their profile image to President #Trump. pic.twitter.com/F9DZxzCUkM — HoSaiLei (@hkbhkese) January 9, 2021 According to Coconuts Hong Kong, some Hong Kong residents like Trump because of his opposition to China, while others are more concerned with the precedent social media companies like Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook are setting for censorship by banning Trump’s accounts. One of the Hong Kong Twitter users who changed his avatar to Trump’s face said banning Trump from the platform was “unacceptable”...
    Chinese Communist officials have tightened the speech restrictions that govern party members, a repudiation of internal calls for more freedom of speech. “A member of the party must not publicly express opinions that are inconsistent with decisions made by the central leadership,” the newly-updated party manual says, according to the South China Morning Post’s translation. That language has been praised by Chinese state media as “boosting democracy within the party,” but it stiffens the previous guidance, which warned against direct contradictions of Chinese authorities. The revision, the first of its kind in 16 years, comes after a year of domestic and international controversy about Chinese censorship — an issue that created a global uproar after doctors who sounded the alarm about the coronavirus pandemic faced punishment. “The key point is freedom of speech, rights guaranteed by the constitution,” Tang Yiming, a classics professor in Wuhan, the city...
    More On: china ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ flops in China box office debut Ex-cybersecurity chief takes blames for massive government hack Chinese students learn English through toilet paper Romney says Russia’s cyber hack of US ‘demands a response’ Following the news of the death of top Chinese doctor Li Wenliang, who tried to issue the first warnings about coronavirus, the Chinese Communist Party reportedly used their armies of paid internet trolls to suppress the story. A report co-authored by ProPublica and the New York Times detailed the how Li’s sudden passing at the young age of 34 was described as an “unprecedented challenge” that could set off a “butterfly effect.” “As commenters fight to guide public opinion, they must conceal their identity, avoid crude patriotism and sarcastic praise, and be sleek and silent in achieving results,” reads one directive sent to news outlets and social media platforms, one of thousands reviewed by...
    The China Film Administration (CFA) has ordered a second censorship review of previously approved films after a racism scandal caused the video game adaptation “Monster Hunters” to be pulled from theaters, according to a Thursday report from The Hollywood Reporter. A 10-second scene in the film showed Asian-American actor MC Jin referring to his knees as “Chi-nese,” an apparent reference to the racist playground rhyme used to insult Asian-Americans. “Monster Hunters,” starring Milla Jovovich, reportedly had been expected to do well in China. It is based off of a Capcom video game hugely popular in the country, and other video game adaptations such as “Resident Evil,” also starring Jovovich, have enjoyed great success in China. Exclusive: China tightens censorship after 'Monster Hunt' racist joke scandal, country's censor delays release of hit Japanese anime #DemonSlayer https://t.co/Nnqkckx1CC pic.twitter.com/YZppxRyej7— The Hollywood Reporter (@THR) December 17, 2020 After the controversy caused by the...
    China is one of the most censorious societies on earth. So what better place for ­Facebook to recruit social-media censors? There are at least half a dozen “Chinese nationals who are working on censorship,” a former Facebook insider told me last week. “So at some point, they [Facebook bosses] thought, ‘Hey, we’re going to get them H-1B visas so they can do this work.’ ” The insider shared an internal directory of the team that does much of this work. It’s called Hate-Speech Engineering (George Orwell, call your office), and most of its members are based at Facebook’s offices in Seattle. Many have Ph.D.s, and their work is extremely complex, involving machine learning — teaching “computers how to learn and act without being explicitly programmed,” as the techy Web site DeepAI.org puts it. When it comes to censorship on social media, that means “teaching” the Facebook code so certain content...
    Sen. Ted Cruz on Thursday said Twitter blocked him from sharing a story from The Post that describes Hunter Biden’s pursuit of a China business deal described by documents on an alleged hard drive formerly belonging to the Democratic presidential candidate’s son. The Texas Republican wrote, “Unbelievable… TODAY, blocking links to ANOTHER NYPost story alleging Hunter Biden sold access to communist China for millions. I just tried to share that story. Here’s Twitter’s response.” Twitter said Cruz could not share the article because it was “identified by Twitter or our partners as being potentially harmful.” Cruz is among the first GOP lawmakers to slam the social giant’s censorship of the second-day Post article on the alleged hard drive. On Wednesday, Republican lawmakers threatened dramatic legal changes after Twitter censored sharing of The Post’s cover story. The company said without evidence that the material may have been hacked. The Post’s initial...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) called out Facebook and Twitter for their efforts to suppress a New York Post article that alleged Hunter Biden “facilitated” a meeting between his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, and a Ukrainian gas company. McCarthy’s remarks came after the two social media giants prevented users from sharing the article on their personal accounts and Twitter locked the account of the New York Post. “Censoring speech to silence political opponents is what you’d expect from countries like China, North Korea, or Iran,” McCarthy wrote in a tweet. “Not American companies like Twitter and Facebook—against one of the nation’s largest newspapers. #StopTheBias!!!” Censoring speech to silence political opponents is what youd expect from countries like China, North Korea, or Iran. Not American companies like Twitter and Facebook—against one of the nation’s largest newspapers. #StopTheBias!!! — Kevin McCarthy (@GOPLeader) October 14, 2020 Twitter began censoring users...
    Hong Kong (CNN Business)Pakistan is taking a cue from its close ally China on internet censorship by banning, of all things, a Chinese social media app. The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority on Friday said it would block the short-form video app TikTok because of complaints "from different segments of the society against immoral/indecent content." The authority said that TikTok, which is owned by Beijing-based ByteDance, has not created a satisfactory way to block offensive content following a warning to get its house in order in July. TikTok says it has protections in place and hopes to settle the matter. The ban is notable because, unlike countries such as India and the United States that have already gone after TikTok, Pakistan doesn't have a tense political relationship with China. The two share close economic, diplomatic and military ties, and Pakistan is an integral part of China's ambitious Belt and Road infrastructure initiative.TikTok...
    China’s censors blocked live coverage of the vice presidential debate Wednesday night when Mike Pence was asked a question about the communist nation, according to Canada’s Globe and Mail. “The interruption, which cut the debate signal to display colour bars for nearly three minutes, affected only a small number of people in China with access to channels like CNN, which is available in some hotels and residential compounds but not in most homes,” Globe and Mail Asia correspondent Nathan VanderKlippe wrote. VICE PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE: PENCE BLASTS BIDEN AS 'CHEERLEADER FOR COMMUNIST CHINA’ “The censorship offered a vivid example of Beijing’s willingness to excise information it cannot control, even when it involves potentially important insights into relations with the country’s largest trading partner,” VanderKlippe continued. “Censors in China have always paid acute attention to domestic events, allowing a robust exchange of opinions on many social and cultural topics, but moving quickly to block criticism of the country’s leaders, discussion of historical events like...
    Hollywood producer Judd Apatow has criticized Hollywood for allowing Chinese censorship. Apatow appeared on Monday’s episode of “Mavericks with Ari Melber,” where he discussed censorship and the lack of films made about human rights. “For me what I perceive as more chilling is a corporate type of censorship that people don’t really notice, which is a lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia, China, and they’re just not going to criticize them and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them or they’re not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they just make so much money,” he explained. (RELATED: If You Watched ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ In China, You Might Have Realized Freddie Mercury All Of Sudden Wasn’t Gay) “So, while we’re all going, ‘can we say this joke or not say that joke?’ on a much...
    The Twitter account belonging to the Chinese virologist who said she can prove the coronavirus was created in a Chinese lab and intentionally released was suspended. Dr. Li-Meng Yan’s Twitter account, followed by just under 60,000 people, was suspended this week after she claimed to possess scientific evidence that China manufactured and released the coronavirus. “It comes from the lab, the lab in Wuhan, and the lab is controlled by China’s government,” Yan said in an interview this month, adding that the proposed theory that the virus came from a Chinese wet market was a “smokescreen.” Twitter declined to comment on the suspension. Yan appeared on Tucker Carlson’s Fox News program and commented on the censorship she’s encountered. "The scientific world also keeps silent [and] works together with the Chinese Communist Party. They don't want people to know this truth,” she said. “That's why I get suspended....
    Filmmaker Judd Apatow gave a recent interview in which he criticized the film industry for essentially censoring content that’s critical of places like China where human rights abuses are happening. The director of hits like “Knocked Up” and “Anchorman” sat down for an interview for MSNBC’s “Mavericks with Ari Melber” in which he briefly touched upon the “chilling” idea that corporations linked to the filmmaking industry are so reliant on capital from markets like China that they’re unwilling to allow anything critical of the country to make their way onto the screen. “For me what I perceive as more chilling is a corporate type of censorship that people don’t really notice, which is a lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia, China, and they’re just not going to criticize them and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them or they’re not...
    Filmmaker Judd Apatow said in an interview this week that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has managed to force Hollywood to self-censor the content it creates through by buying off the industry. Apatow made the remarks during an interview with MSNBC’s Ari Melber while talking about how the industry censors content to avoid upsetting other nations. “A lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia or China, and they’re just not going to criticize them and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them or they’re not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they make so much money,” Apatow said, noting that the censorship “completely shut(s) down critical content” about important issues. “Instead of us doing business with China and that leading to China being more free, what has happened is that China has bought our silence...
    Judd Apatow, longtime writer and director on the Hollywood entertainment circuit, says Hollywood companies will not criticize China — all because of the almighty dollar. What are the details? In a recent interview with MSNBC's Ari Melber, Apatow, 52, said that Hollywood is turning a blind eye to human rights violations taking place across the world — especially when it comes to China. "What I perceive as more chilling is a corporate type of censorship that people don't really notice, which is a lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia or China, and they're just not going to criticize them, and they're not going to let their shows criticize them, or they're not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they just make so much money." He pointed out that Hollywood...
    Hollywood director Judd Apatow has slammed Hollywood’s willingness to censor its content to appease China, saying that Beijing has successfully bought the “silence” of the industry’s power players on matters concerning human rights atrocities in the communist country. In a preview of an upcoming interview for Mavericks with Ari Melber, Apatow — known for The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Anchorman, and Talladega Nights — called out a “corporate type of censorship that people don’t really notice” for regimes such as communist China and the Saudi Arabian monarchy. “A lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia or China, and they’re just not going to criticize them, and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them, or they’re not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they just make so much money,” Apatow explained. What Apatow described as “much scarier” is how Hollywood has “completely...
    Hollywood writer and director Judd Apatow criticized Hollywood's willingness to overlook human rights abuses around the world. Apatow, 52, acknowledged a "chilling" typing of "censorship" where Hollywood companies are "not going to criticize" foreign actors who are committing atrocities around the world during an interview with MSNBC's Ari Melber for his series Mavericks with Ari Melber. “What I perceive as more chilling is a corporate type of censorship that people don’t really notice, which is a lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia or China, and they’re just not going to criticize them, and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them, or they’re not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they just make so much money,” Apatow explained. He added, “They have just completely shut down critical content about human rights abuses in China.” Apatow,...
    Director Judd Apatow spoke to MSNBC’s Ari Melber about an alarming kind of Hollywood censorship concerning human rights abuses in nations like China and Saudi Arabia. In a preview for an upcoming episode of “Mavericks with Ari Melber,” Apatow said that what concerns him is “a corporate type of censorship that people don’t really notice, which is a lot of these giant corporate entities have business with countries around the world, Saudi Arabia or China, and they’re just not going to criticize them, and they’re not going to let their shows criticize them, or they’re not going to air documentaries that go deep into truthful areas because they just make so much money.” Compared to discussions of “can we say this joke or not say that joke?”, Apatow said, what’s “much scarier” is how “they have just completely shut down critical content about human rights abuses in China.” For...
    On Friday, Apple published a new human rights policy committing to “freedom of information and expression” after facing years of criticism over the company’s willingness to follow mainland China’s censorship laws. As first reported by the Financial Times on Friday, Apple’s four-page policy document commits to “respecting the human rights of everyone whose lives we touch — including our employees, suppliers, contractors, and customers.” But it does not cite any particular country, like China, where the company has been asked to ban apps that allow users to circumvent censorship before. According to Apple’s policy document (PDF), this approach is based on the United Nation’s Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. “We’re required to comply with local laws” Apple says that it will continue to follow censorship laws in countries where they exist. “We work every day to make quality products, including content and services, available to our users...
    When the novel coronavirus was first discovered in China last winter, the country responded aggressively, placing tens of millions of people into strict lockdown. As Covid-19 spread from Wuhan to the rest of the world, the Chinese government was just as forceful in controlling how the health crisis was portrayed and discussed among its own people. Politically sensitive material, like references to the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, have long been forbidden on China’s highly censored internet, but researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab say these efforts reached a new level during the pandemic. “The blunt range of censored content goes beyond what we expected, including general health information such as the fact [that] the virus spreads from human contact,” says Masashi Crete-Nishihata, the associate director of Citizen Lab, a research group that focuses on technology and human rights. Citizen Lab's latest report, published earlier this week, finds that...
    "Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj" will not return for a seventh season at Netflix. The news was shared by the 34-year-old comedian on Twitter on Tuesday, who bid a fond farewell to his talk show. "What a run. @patriotact has come to an end," he wrote. "I got to work with the best writers, producers, researchers, and animators in the game. My 2 babies were born and grew up with the show. TY to @Netflix and everyone who watched." NETFLIX PULLS 'PATRIOT ACT WITH HASAN MINHAJ' EPISODE AFTER GETTING 'VALID' LEGAL COMPLAINTS FROM SAUDI ARABIA To finish the post, Minhaj made a joke referencing his set, which was adorned with massive television screens: "Now it’s time to return these screens to Best Buy." The tweet included a picture of the comedian on the set of the show, where he often discussed the cultural and political landscape. Netflix did not immediately respond to Fox...
    Leader of the “China Owns Us” campaign Rick Berman sat down with Daily Caller White House correspondent Anders Hagstrom to discuss the campaign’s goals and how he thinks the U.S. should counteract China’s influence over American companies. Berman stated that the U.S. has allowed China nearly free rein to purchase American companies by proxy and use them to message to Americans. As long as America isn’t allowed to spread American ideals in China, Berman argued, China should not be allowed to spread its communist ideals in the U.S. (RELATED: Chinese Propaganda Outlet Has Paid US Newspapers $19 Million For Advertising, Printing) Berman said his campaign aims to educate Americans on how much U.S. industries rely on materials and labor from China, and just how much that hurts American workers. WATCH: Check out TheDC’s other videos and subscribe to our YouTube channel so you never miss out. SUBSCRIBE! NOW CHECK OUT...
    Beijing (CNN Business)A Chinese advertisement for Cartier has reignited discussion about the country's taboo around LGBTQ rights. The French luxury jeweler released a minute-long ad Monday to promote its wares — including its iconic Trinity ring — ahead of China's Qixi Festival on August 25, the country's answer to Valentine's Day. The ad features couples in romantic settings and groups of people in cars and at beach bonfires wearing the signature tri-color bands. It ends with the message, "How far would you go for love?"There are no subtitles or narration in the video. But a printed version of the ad posted on the jeweler's official page on the Chinese e-commerce website Tmall features descriptive text under an image of two men who were shown cycling together in the video. The text reads: "Father and son are also friends — happily sharing life's journey."That caption raised many eyebrows on the Chinese...
    The left-wing PEN America has repeatedly attacked President Donald Trump as a menace to free speech. Now the elite cultural organization finds itself in the awkward position of agreeing with the Trump administration on the issue of Hollywood’s cozy relationship with China’s Communist regime, which is suppressing the freedom of expression around the world. PEN America published a scathing report Wednesday in which it said that Beijing is “creating a climate of self-censorship” in Hollywood, with studios routinely making compromises on free expression by changing the content of their movies that are intended for both American and foreign audiences. “These concessions to the power of the Chinese market have happened mostly quietly, with little attention and, often, little debate. Steadily, a new set of mores has taken hold in Hollywood, one in which appeasing Chinese government investors and gatekeepers has simply become a way of doing business,” the study says. “We...
    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law on "Online Platforms and Market Power" in the Rayburn House office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on July 29, 2020.Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images The House Judiciary Committee held an antitrust hearing on Wednesday with the CEOs of four of the largest U.S. technology companies – Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google – to determine whether they have grown too large (i.e., are "too successful"), and therefore, should be broken up.  Democrats on the Committee suggested that these companies' success threatens the free market and even democracy itself.  Numerous Republicans raised concerns about their alleged political bias as well as their size. Meanwhile, in China, the government is taking an opposite course.  Instead of attacking its "national champions," China is showering them with government subsidies and discriminating against "would-be" competitors to...
    China has issued new guidelines targeting the Christian faith, filmmakers claim, banning content such as miracles and healing in movies. China’s National Administration of Radio and Television, which controls radio and TV in the communist country, now outlaws 20 new categories of content, including material promoting fabricated history, sacred relics and demonic possessions, UCA News reported. Wu Daxiong, a Shanghai television producer, called the guidelines a “fatal blow” to the industry as it limits the scope of their production. A Catholic filmmaker said the new guidelines “almost entirely ban” faith-based content in a country that is already hostile to the freedom of religion. “If we film the life of Jesus avoiding the content banned by the guidelines, we will only be presenting Jesus as an ordinary person, and this is unacceptable to Christians,” the filmmaker identified only as Joseph told UCA News. Father Yo of Shandong also questioned the guidelines....
    SHANGHAI – To protest censorship during the COVID-19 outbreak, a Chinese artist known as Brother Nut kept his mouth shut for 30 days, using metal clasps, gloves, duct tape and other items. In the project – #shutupfor30days – he also sealed his mouth with packing tape with “404,” the error code for a webpage not found, written across it, a nod to the blocking of online content that is common in China for sensitive issues. “If you ask me how an artist should digest unfair treatment, such as violence or censorship, my first reaction is: keep fighting, with art,” said Brother Nut. The 39-year-old artist has built a reputation for statement-making projects in a country where the room for dissent has shrunk and censorship has intensified under President Xi Jinping. China faced a barrage of criticism over the virus that emerged late last year in Wuhan, from being slow to...
    SHANGHAI – To protest censorship during the COVID-19 outbreak, a Chinese artist known as Brother Nut kept his mouth shut for 30 days, using metal clasps, gloves, duct tape and other items. In the project – #shutupfor30days – he also sealed his mouth with packing tape with “404,” the error code for a webpage not found, written across it, a nod to the blocking of online content that is common in China for sensitive issues. “If you ask me how an artist should digest unfair treatment, such as violence or censorship, my first reaction is: keep fighting, with art,” said Brother Nut. The 39-year-old artist has built a reputation for statement-making projects in a country where the room for dissent has shrunk and censorship has intensified under President Xi Jinping. China faced a barrage of criticism over the virus that emerged late last year in Wuhan, from being slow to...
    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - To protest censorship during the COVID-19 outbreak, a Chinese artist known as Brother Nut kept his mouth shut for 30 days, using metal clasps, gloves, duct tape and other items. In the project - #shutupfor30days - he also sealed his mouth with packing tape with "404", the error code for a webpage not found, written across it, a nod to the blocking of online content that is common in China for sensitive issues. "If you ask me how an artist should digest unfair treatment, such as violence or censorship, my first reaction is: keep fighting, with art," said Brother Nut. The 39-year-old artist has built a reputation for statement-making projects in a country where the room for dissent has shrunk and censorship has intensified under President Xi Jinping. China faced a barrage of criticism over the virus that emerged late last year in Wuhan, from being slow...
    British universities are engaging with a Chinese online platform so that its learning materials comply with China’s repressive internet regulations. Four top Russell Group universities — King’s College London, Queen Mary University of London, Southampton, and York — are taking part in the pilot programme that would allow Chinese students to study for British degrees online without falling foul of the communist nation’s internet censorship that blocks certain websites. Run by JISC, which provides digital services for British universities, the system sets up a connection between the institution and the student in China via the Chinese internet company Alibaba Cloud, which is a subsidiary of the Alibaba Group headed by Jack Ma, one of the wealthiest men in the world. The system works by only allowing access to “resources that are controlled and specified” by the university. The resources need to be on the “security ‘allow’ list”, according to JISC, meaning that...
    China’s state-run Global Times reported approvingly on Thursday that Hong Kong has been forced to suppress countless movies, television shows, books, and online posts that could violate the new security law imposed by Beijing because the material could be judged to “threaten” Communist China, and those who display or sell the “threatening” material could be held legally liable. The Global Times quoted Hong Kong secretary for security John Lee Ka-Chiu stating that the Chinese security law fixed a number of “loopholes” in law enforcement, such as by giving the police new powers to “remove information that incites others to commit crimes or engage in crimes that endanger national security.” Lee warned that if “information that threatens national security” is not removed, “the publisher, network, and service provider should hold legal accountability.” “He noted that representatives of any organization operating in Hong Kong or foreign organizations should provide materials for police,...
    Journalist Tracy Wen Liu, who did some on-the-ground reporting from Wuhan during the worst days of the coronavirus outbreak, warned in a Foreign Policy article on Tuesday that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is once again censoring doctors and patients to keep them from discussing the truth of the pandemic and China’s response. Liu cited some of her own reporting from Wuhan this year to illustrate that the notorious muzzling of doctors and scrubbing of social media posts is happening again. She said her own account on Weibo, the Chinese microblogging site that stands in for Twitter, was blocked in May despite accumulating some 90,000 followers after nine years of posts. “A wave of new censorship has grown during the coronavirus pandemic, most of it focused on covering up the stories around COVID-19 itself,” Liu said. In January and February, the CCP was mostly concerned with suppressing the horror stories...
    Pro-democracy books in Hong Kong were removed from public libraries to be screened for compliance with China’s new security law, which targets subversion and secession, numerous sources reported. At least nine books have been removed or marked as “under reviews” on the city’s online library catalog Sunday, days after the security law was put into effect. The actions have heightened concerns that authorities will censor literature, the media, and the internet, according to the Wall Street Journal.  “The book collection must comply with the law of Hong Kong,” a government spokeswoman said. “While legal advice will be sought in the process of the review, the books will not be available for borrowing and reference in libraries.” 1/ More than just punitive measures, the national security law also imposes a mainland-style censorship regime upon this international financial city. Although my books are published years before Hong Kong’s anti-extradition movement, they are...
    By Sumeet Chatterjee and Scott Murdoch HONG KONG (Reuters) - A year ago, growing anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong were a hot topic in conversations among bankers, lawyers and other investment professionals in one of the world's biggest and freest financial hubs. On Thursday, two days after China imposed a controversial new security law on the city, you could almost hear a pin drop. Bankers were tight lipped, shunning any mention of the legislation over the phone or messaging apps in a sign of how much disquiet it has triggered. More than half a dozen people Reuters spoke to said they chose not to talk about the impact of the law on their businesses with their colleagues and external contacts, though there had been no such official instruction from their respective organizations. The sweeping legislation pushed the semi-autonomous city, which is the regional home for a large number of global...
    The encrypted instant messenger Telegram said on Monday it’s ramping up efforts to develop anti-censorship technologies serving users in countries where it is banned or partially blocked, including China and Iran. “Over the course of the last two years, we had to regularly upgrade our ‘unblocking’ technology to stay ahead of the censors… We don’t want this technology to get rusty and obsolete. That is why we have decided to direct our anti-censorship resources into other places where Telegram is still banned by governments — places like Iran and China,” co-founder and chief executive Pavel Durov, who lived in Russia for years before going into self-imposed exile, posted on his personal Telegram channel on Monday. The pledge noticeably came on the heels of the Russian government’s decision to lift its ban on Telegram last week. The app has generated impressive growth in Russia even after it was officially banned in...
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers including Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Ben Sasse (R-NE) have written a letter to Zoom CEO Eric Yuan asking for answers after the teleconferencing company disabled accounts of two U.S.-based activists who were commemorating the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. The disabling of the accounts came at the request of China’s communist government. “We write with deep concern regarding reports that Zoom, a U.S.-based company, deactivated the accounts of two U.S.-based, pro-democracy Chinese activists after they held a Zoom meeting on the June 4th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre,” said the Friday letter. “Your company has admitted that it did so at the request of the Chinese government to comply with the laws of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), because some of the participants resided inside the PRC.” Zhou Fengsuo, one of the two U.S-based activists, participated in the original Tiananmen Square...
    HONG KONG (AP) — Video app company Zoom said Thursday it regretted that some meetings involving U.S.-based Chinese dissidents were disrupted, as meanwhile a prominent Hong Kong activist said his account was blocked despite the city’s guarantees of free speech. Zoom is headquartered in San Jose, California, but conducts much of its research and development in mainland China. Use of the virtual meetings app has skyrocketed during the pandemic. The company confirmed reports that it had reactivated the Zoom accounts of a U.S.-based group of dissidents were suspended after they held an online event commemorating the June 4, 1989, crackdown on protesters in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. “We regret that a few recent meetings with participants both inside and outside of China were negatively impacted and important conversations were disrupted,” Zoom said in a statement. Asked at a regular briefing, a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson said she...
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