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the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s:

    The Pennsylvania case describes the move by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, backed by Donald Trump, who claims that the judicial process uses a “cocoon of pseudo-claims” in support of “treason abuse” and believes in a “surreal alternative reality.” State Attorney General Josh Shapiro writes: “Texas is trying to invalidate elections in four states. The claim that this Court must exercise its original jurisdiction and then anoint Texas’ presidential candidate is legally inalienable and disrespectful to the principles of constitutional democracy. “ Donald Trump lost four key states, and Texas’ move is an attempt to invalidate millions of votes that could change the election for him. The Pennsylvania filing further states: “Texas’ attempt to elect the next president of this court has no legal or factual basis. The court should not follow this treacherous abuse of the judicial process and should send a clear and vague signal that it should...
    (CNN)Ken Paxton is a lawman being chased by the law. And when the Texas Republican attorney general filed a suit on Tuesday with the US Supreme Court on behalf of his state, he also became an even more rank hypocrite. James C. MoorePaxton, who has been indicted on securities fraud and accused by top aides of bribery, abuse of office and other potentially criminal offenses -- charges that he has denied -- argued that a handful of battleground states destroyed the integrity of the 2020 election vote totals. He insists the US Constitution was violated by allowing their legislatures to make last-minute changes that ignored federal electoral regulations. Earlier in the campaign, Paxton played a key role in President Donald Trump's fight against expanding mail-in ballots. Now Paxton's plea to the Court is that Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Georgia must be found to have used the Covid-19 pandemic as...
    Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron joined a group of Republican attorneys general who filed a lawsuit challenging mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania. “Today, I joined my colleagues in an amicus brief asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the absentee ballot ruling of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court,” Cameron said in a statement Monday. “Our action today is about ensuring the rule of law is upheld during the election process.” My statement regarding the rule of law in the election process: Read the amicus brief here: https://t.co/Ulu7PU3akq pic.twitter.com/wMKfsOFkfV— Attorney General Daniel Cameron (@kyoag) November 9, 2020 “While this did not occur in Kentucky, what happens in other states during a presidential election matters to Kentuckians because we are electing our President and Vice President,” Cameron continued. “Legal matters like the one involving Pennsylvania set a judicial precedent that not only affects this election, but future elections as well. My interest...
    Amid the stress of the ongoing US election count, anxious TV viewers have enjoyed an unexpected moment of comedic relief on MSNBC.   Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Schapiro was being interviewed by the cable network from his home in Abington on Friday night when his teenage son Jonah wandered into the room.  Video of the incident, which is now going viral on social media, shows the Attorney General speaking via Zoom, completely unaware that the teen had strolled into the frame behind him.  I’m taking his phone away for 24 hours. ???? https://t.co/1OYI8N4LwV— Josh Shapiro (@JoshShapiroPA) November 7, 2020 Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Schapiro was being interviewed on MSNBC from his home in Abington on Friday night when his teenage son Jonah wandered into the room In the short clip, Democrat Shapiro is heard railing against President Trump as the boy walks in texting on his phone.  When Jonah looks...
    THE hilarious moment Pennsylvania's Attorney General is interrupted by his teen son in the middle of an MSNBC interview has gone viral. In the clip, Josh Shapiro talks of Trump's attempt to throw out mail-in ballots when his teenage son accidentally wanders into the room. 4A live broadcast of Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro was interrupted when his teenage son accidentally wandered into the room 4Unaware of the blunder and completely absorbed by texting on his phone, the boy looks up to realise he's on a live broadcast Unaware of the blunder and completely absorbed by texting on his phone, the boy looks up to realise he's on a live broadcast. He then backward steps out of the room and sidles out the door in an attempt to go unnoticed. However, the three-second cameo was quickly picked up by amused viewers who took to social media to...
    Sen. Ted Cruz shot back at Pennsylvania’s Democratic attorney general for telling him to “stay out of” the state’s disputed tabulation of presidential election votes. “When you’re breaking the law, ignoring court orders, counting ballots in secret & threatening to steal the presidency, it’s not ‘PA’s business,’” the Texas Republican tweeted Friday. “It’s America’s business, and we have the right to expect votes will be counted (1) fairly, (2) w/ transparency & (3) NOT in secret.” When you’re breaking the law, ignoring court orders, counting ballots in secret & threatening to steal the presidency, it’s not “PA’s business.” It’s America’s business, and we have the right to expect votes will be counted (1) fairly, (2) w/ transparency & (3) NOT in secret. https://t.co/jkkyB0Bc0q— Ted Cruz (@tedcruz) November 6, 2020 Cruz appeared on Fox News with Sean Hannity Thursday night, echoing the president’s concerns of voter fraud and an overall...
    The Trump campaign has a team on the ground in the key battleground state of Pennsylvania after the state's attorney general made concerning comments, White House Director of Communications Alyssa Farah told Fox News Radio. Pennsylvania’s Attorney General Josh Shapiro, a Democrat, found himself in hot water on social media after claiming that President Trump has lost the ability to win the battleground state, just over 24 hours before the polls close on Election Day. “If all the votes are added up in PA, Trump is going to lose,” Shapiro wrote on Twitter. “That’s why he’s working overtime to subtract as many votes as possible from this process.” TRUMP PREDICTS HE WILL BEAT JOE BIDEN BY LARGER MARGIN THAN VICTORY OVER CLINTON “For the record, he’s 0-6 against us in court,” the attorney general added. “We’ve protected voting rights. Now, ignore the noise—vote!” Reacting to Shapiro's tweet, Farah told "Fox Across America" with...
    Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro came under fire for comments he made about the state's presidential election results. "If all the votes are added up in PA, Trump is going to lose," Shapiro tweeted Saturday. "That’s why he’s working overtime to subtract as many votes as possible from this process." [PREDICT TUESDAY'S WINNER WITH THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER'S INTERACTIVE ELECTORAL MAP] If all the votes are added up in PA, Trump is going to lose. That’s why he’s working overtime to subtract as many votes as possible from this process.For the record, he’s 0-6 against us in court. We’ve protected voting rights. Now, ignore the noise—vote!https://t.co/mN8t6TDud7— Josh Shapiro (@JoshShapiroPA) October 31, 2020 "Before a single vote has been counted, Pennsylvania’s Democrat Attorney General is declaring that Biden has already won and promising to litigate the state into Biden’s corner," Federalist co-founder Sean Davis said. Before a single vote has been...
    Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro fired back at President Donald Trump’s recent comments demanding that election results be announced quickly, dismissing the president as “all bark and no bite,” and vowing that in his state, “we will count these ballots.” Shapiro made the comments in an appearance on CNN Sunday evening, telling Erin Burnett that he had been concerned about delays in mail delivery, and urging viewers who had received an absentee ballot but not yet mailed it in to instead deliver the completed ballot in person at the dropbox at their local election supervisor’s office. Trump had spoken to reporters earlier Sunday while traveling between his campaign rallies, criticizing voters who hadn’t sent their ballots back “a month ago.” “I don’t think it’s fair that we have to wait a long period of time after the election,” said Trump. Burnett brought up the very close margin of victory...
    U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Sept. 23 in Washington.Oliver Contreras-Pool/Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.This story was published originally by ProPublica, a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. When the Justice Department recently publicized an ongoing investigation into potentially improperly discarded Trump ballots, critics accused it of violating long-standing agency policy against interfering in an election. But the unusual decision to publicly detail the Pennsylvania case may also have run afoul of guidelines that Attorney General William Barr himself issued to federal prosecutors this year, according to a memo obtained by ProPublica. In May, Barr wrote a directive to all Justice Department employees imploring them to be “particularly sensitive to safeguarding the Department’s...
    Justin Elliott - Robert Faturechi October 7, 2020 9:21AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on ProPublica. When the Justice Department recently publicized an ongoing investigation into potentially improperly discarded Trump ballots, critics accused it of violating long-standing agency policy against interfering in an election. But the unusual decision to publicly detail the Pennsylvania case may also have run afoul of guidelines that Attorney General William Barr himself issued to federal prosecutors this year, according to a memo obtained by ProPublica. : In May, Barr wrote a directive to all Justice Department employees imploring them to be "particularly sensitive to safeguarding the Department's reputation for fairness, neutrality, and non-partisanship" when it comes to election-related crimes. "Partisan politics," he wrote, "must play no role in the decisions of federal investigators or prosecutors regarding any investigations or criminal charges. Law enforcement officers and prosecutors may never select the timing of public statements (attributed or...
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