Sunday, Dec 05, 2021 - 00:35:04
83 results - (0.000 seconds)

translator:

latest news at page 1:
12
    Three months ago, Zabiullah R., who served as a combat translator for the 82nd Airborne in Afghanistan, did not know what would happen to him and his family after the U.S. military withdrawal.    Zabiullah, affectionately known by troops as Johnny, was able to escape Kabul in August, with the help of a U.S. senator, a private veterans group, and members of the 82nd Airborne. Johnny arrived with his family at his new North Carolina home back in October.    Today, his young daughters are already getting something they never would have received under the Taliban: an education.    Johnny and his family inside Rea View Elementary. (Courtesy of Sarah Verardo) TALIBAN’S NEW MEDIA GUIDELINES BAN TV DRAMAS WITH FEMALE ACTORS, MAKE WOMEN JOURNALISTS WEAR HIJABS  "They’re happy and they’re excited," said Johnny. "Every morning … 6 o'clock in the morning, my two daughters, they wake up and get ready … just come into my room and wake up us."   Johnny says the girls even ask to go on weekends.   "I tell them, like 'two days off, you have...
    Trion City Schools is seeking qualified candidates for a Parent Engagement Coordinator/Translator  Duties include (but are not limited to): Translate a variety of documents (literary, legal, technical, educational) and other materials, insuring preservation of original meaning; Consult with colleagues in order to understand specialized concepts and translate them appropriately; Refer to online translation tools for additional assistance with translation/interpretation; Schedule meetings and appointments; Attend meetings to translate/interpret for non-English speaking families; Build and maintain trusting relationships with families; Work with colleagues from different specialties to provide support to families Communicate with parents, teachers and administrators to understand student’s and family’s challenges specific to their culture and native languages; Must also be able to perform receptionist duties when needed in school offices (welcome visitors, answer phone calls and taking/delivering messages. Qualified candidates must possess the ability to grasp new concepts quickly (e.g. educational terms); a clear writing style with impeccable knowledge of...
    President Joe Biden met with Pope Francis Friday morning at the Vatican, and while the press was not allowed to broadcast live some video was just released. The Recount posted clips comparing the visits of President Biden and President Donald Trump with the Pope, focusing in on the Pope's Italian translator's face. A picture really is worth a thousand words: Italian translator: Trump vs. Biden https://t.co/bpQnSB4uNP — The Recount (@The Recount) 1635520298.0 Related Articles Around the Web Pope Francis: Climate change mostly man-made - BBC News › Fact Check-Video of Pope Francis features false English subtitles ... › Report typos and corrections to: feedback@alternet.org.#story_page_post_article Have the Trump years permanently changed the GOP? Understand the importance of honest news ? So do we. The past year has been the most arduous of our lives. The Covid-19 pandemic continues to be catastrophic not only to our health - mental and physical - but also to the stability of millions of people. For all of us independent news organizations, it’s no exception. We’ve covered everything...
    The 82nd Airborne's motto is "first in, last out." They were the last soldiers to leave Afghanistan on the final military flight, and this week one of their valued translators, Zabiullah R. affectionately known by the troops as Johnny, arrived with his family at his new home in rural North Carolina. "We’ll do whatever we can do to welcome them here and make them comfortable and make them feel like they are at home now," said Tracy Byrd, one of several hundred neighbors to line the roadway and welcome this Afghan family to Waxhaw County near Charlotte.  Johnny, who served with U.S. infantry units for more than six years, was rescued at the end of August by a U.S. Senator, a private veterans group, and members of the 82nd Airborne, one of the last combat translators to make it out before the war’s end. US ARMY PARATROOPER KILLED FIGHTING ISIS IN IRAQ IS IDENTIFIED As he exited the car which drove him and his wife and three daughters from Fort Lee, Virginia on the last part of this perilous journey...
    The family of an ex-NSA translator who leaked a report about Russian election meddling to journalists has said it is a “huge disappointment” President Joe Biden has not granted her a full pardon.  Reality Winner, 29, was given the longest ever sentence for unauthorized release of government information when she was convicted under the Espionage Act in 2018. 5Reality Winner (center) after her release to house arrest with mom Billie (left), sister Brittany (right), and niece Indigo 5Reality Winner in her mug shot from 2017Credit: Reuters She remained in a federal detention center in her native Texas serving her five-year sentence despite urgent pleas for compassionate release from her family last year after she caught Covid.  The former intelligence specialist was finally released to home arrest in June and is now staying in her parents’ home as her family fights for her to receive clemency, if not a full pardon, and claims the way she was treated was “wrong.” Her story is hitting the spotlight again this week after a show based on the transcripts of her first interview with...
    Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical SocietyGeorge Bonga, ca.1870Fur trader and translator George Bonga was one of the first African Americans born in what later became the state of Minnesota. His mother was Ojibwe, as were both of his wives. Through these relationships, Bonga was part of the mixed racial and cultural groups that connected trading companies and American Indians. He frequently guided white immigrants and traders through the region. Comfortable in many worlds, Bonga often worked as an advocate for the Ojibwe in their dealings with trading companies and the government. Around 1802, George Bonga was born to an African American father and his Ojibwe wife. His father, Pierre Bonga, was the son of Jean Bonga. Jean had been brought to Mackinac Island after the American Revolution by a British officer. Either an enslaved man or an indentured servant, Jean Bonga was freed by the British soldier’s death. He married and started a family. Pierre Bonga, meanwhile, worked in the fur trade with the Ojibwe near Duluth. George’s younger brother, Stephen Bonga, was also a notable fur trader and translator...
    BANGKOK (AP) — A court in Myanmar ruled Thursday that it will not allow a Burmese-English translator at the upcoming trial of Sean Turnell, an Australian economist who has been charged under the Official Secrets Act. Turnell is to be tried with the country’s ousted leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and three former Cabinet members charged in the same case. Turnell had served as an adviser to Suu Kyi and was arrested with his co-defendants after her elected government was ousted by the army in February. Violating the secrets law carries a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison. The colonial-era statute criminalizes the possession, collection, recording, publishing, or sharing of state information that is “directly or indirectly, useful to an enemy.” The ruling forbidding a translator was issued at a pre-trial hearing at a special court in the capital, Naypyitaw, said Ye Lin Aung, Turnell’s lawyer. All five defendants were present for the hearing, which was closed to the public and media. He said the prosecution had asked that no translator be allowed and the judge agreed, citing security...
    "Squid Game" is one of Netflix's most popular programs ever, but that doesn't mean it's without controversy. The Korean-language drama has already become the platform's most popular non-English language show and is on track to become its biggest hit ever. With the show's popularity comes heightened attention paid to its subtitles, as it's been subtitled in over 30 languages and dubbed in 13. Some viewers fluent in both English and Korean have become frustrated with the English language subtitles, claiming their translations misrepresented what was actually said by the actors speaking Korean. Among the more vocal critics is Youngmi Mayer, host of the "Feeling Asian" podcast, who said on TikTok that when character Han Mi-nyeo is trying to convince other players to team up with her, the subtitles say, "I’m not a genius, but I still got it worked out." What she actually says is, "I am very smart. I just never got a chance to study." 'SQUID GAME' TO BECOME NETFLIX'S MOST POPULAR SHOW: EVERYTHING TO KNOW Mayer's videos have sparked debate about the show with some critics accusing...
    Former White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham admitted she thought it was a mistake to have worked for the Trump administration in a new Monday morning interview.  She joined Good Morning America ahead of the release of her memoir, 'I'll Take Your Questions Now: What I Saw In The Trump White House,' and spoke candidly about her regrets and worries about Trump's past actions and future potential presidential bid.  One of those concerns is how Donald Trump interacted with authoritarian rulers, who Grisham claimed he was desperate to 'impress.' Host George Stephanopoulos asked Grisham about her accounts of Trump's deferential demeanor and manipulation at the hands of Russian President Vladimir Putin.   'How do you explain why the president was so placating of President Putin?' he asked. 'This is my opinion, but I got the feeling he wanted to impress dictators. I think he almost admired how tough they were,' she said. Grisham claims Trump told Putin during a G20 meeting in Japan, 'I'll act tougher with you for a few minutes, but that's just for the cameras.'  During the same...
    MILLIONS of Android users are being told to uninstall apps that could be secretly costing them money. The malware has been designed to look like legitimate apps and is said to have targeted 10 million Android users from over 70 countries. 1You should uninstall any of the apps mentioned in the reportCredit: Alamy According to a recent report by Zimperium Labs, the innocent looking apps were costing unknowing Android users around $42 per month. The money making scheme is said to date back to November 2020. That's when criminals were putting the apps on the Google Play Store as well as third-party app stores. Around 200 apps are said to have been involved. They covered a range of categories including dating and entertainment. Most read in TechBOTTOMS UP Google Maps user accidentally sets up 'energy drinks business'I CAN'T Millions of iPhones are BLOCKED from all future Apple updatesHACK ATTACK Your cell phone can be hacked through free public WiFi – here's how to stop itPHONE INVASION Check your mobile NOW – these 'spying' apps mean someone is watching youAPPY SLAP...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Hispanic baseball players make up about a quarter of major league rosters. As CBS 2 honors extraordinary people throughout Hispanic Heritage Month, Jackie Kostek introduces us to a vital behind-the-scenes member of the Chicago White Sox. READ MORE: CFD: At Least 4 People Shot Across 2 Sites In West LoopSomeone who wrote a fantasy contract to himself 25 years ago and turned it into reality. “Mr. Billy Russo. We’re sending you this letter from the White Sox…” Billy Russo was about nine years old when he got his first (pretend) contract with the South Side team. Russo signed the fantasy contract, but it would be years before he would set foot in Guaranteed Rate Field. You see, Russo grew up a little south of the South Side – about 2,700 miles south. Watching the Sox on TV and dreaming of playing big league ball like fellow Venezuelan Ozzie Guillen. The only problem? “I never was a superstar or a guy with a super skill set,” said Billy Russo. He became a baseball beat writer instead, eventually pitching...
    VLADIMIR Putin brought an attractive translator along to the G20 summit to distract Donald Trump, a former White House official has revealed. Stephanie Grisham, an ex-White House secretary, made the bombshell claim in her new book "I'll Take Your Questions Now, What I Saw at Trump White House". 2It has been claimed that Putin brought an attractive translator (L) with him to a G20 summit to distract Donald Trump 2Stephanie Grisham made the claims in her new bookCredit: Reuters In the book, Grisham wrote that Russian expert Fiona Hill believed the Russian president had brought an attractive aide to the G20 summit in Japan in 2019 in a bid to throw Trump off. "As the meeting began, Fiona Hill leaned over and asked me if I had noticed Putin's translator," Grisham recounted. "...Who was a very attractive brunette woman with long hair, a pretty face, and a wonderful figure. "She proceeded to tell me that she suspected the woman had been selected by Putin specifically to distract our president." Grisham also claimed that former President Trump called her immediately...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Tenants with disabilities rallied against poor housing conditions and what they call discriminatory treatment at a housing complex on the Lower East Side on Tuesday. CBS2’s Natalie Duddridge spoke to residents who say they’ve been forgotten. READ MORE: Hispanic Heritage Month: Ponce Family Passes Down Musical Art Of Mariachi Through GenerationsFrederique McCall is hearing impaired, so a translator spoke for her, expressing her frustration over the elevators she says have been broken more than a year. “I’ve been stuck in here six to eight times. I’ll scream to the top of my lungs for 30 minutes, and it’s a deaf building, so everybody’s deaf,” she said through a translator. McCall says last week, residents even had to carry a tenant in a wheelchair up the stairs. She has lived at 174 Forsyth Street for nearly 30 years, since the apartment was first built for low-income disabled tenants. “Now, since new management has taken over, like six years now, this building has gone down so bad,” resident Johnny Francia said through a translator. “We have roaches and...
    Russian President Vladimir Putin brought an 'attractive' translator with him to distract former President Donald Trump at their 2019 meeting - and Trump told Putin he would act tough in front of the cameras and then play nice privately, former White House official Stephanie Grisham reveals in her forthcoming tell-all.  'OK, I'm going to act a little tougher with you for a few minutes. But it's for the cameras, and after they leave, we'll talk. You understand,' Trump had told Putin when they met in June 2019 in Japan at the G20, Grisham recounted.   Copies of Grisham's book - I'll Take Your Questions Now, What I Saw at Trump White House - were obtained by The Washington Post and The New York Times. It his bookshelves on October 5.  President Donald Trump (right) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan in June 2019. Stephanie Grisham's forthcoming book sheds more light on this meeting   Stephanie Grisham, Melania Trump's spokeswoman and chief of staff, as well as White House press secretary, said Trump...
    Army combat veteran Spencer Sullivan has never felt more victorious. Sullivan spent years fighting to get his Afghan translator asylum after his former platoon’s other interpreter was denied a U.S. visa before being killed by the Taliban in 2017. On Wednesday, Abdulhaq Sodais was finally granted asylum by a court in Germany, where he was forced to flee after being denied a U.S. visa repeatedly despite facing death threats for aiding U.S. troops during its 20-year war in Afghanistan. Sullivan, who now lives in Virginia, said he dropped his phone when he saw the text message from Sodais. “I just started crying,” Sullivan said. The decision marked the end of an eight-year journey between the two men who risked their lives together trying to eliminate the Taliban, bonding in a way that can only be forged in war. Sullivan dedicated himself to helping Sodais after losing another translator, Sayed Masoud, who was killed by the Taliban in 2017 while waiting for a U.S. visa. The former soldier is among scores of U.S. combat veterans who have been...
    Greg Nash/Getty Images The New York Post and two prominent lawmakers fell for a false story that Taliban fighters hung a man from a seized U.S. military helicopter. “Shocking video shows man hanging below Black Hawk flown by Taliban,” read the headline of the Post story, with video showing a man dangling from a Black Hawk helicopter over Afghanistan. The report included comments from right wing pundits expressing outrage at the supposedly horrific image, which one commentator blamed on President Joe Biden. Prominent lawmakers also fell for the video, which CNN reports was first posted by a comedian on Twitter, and alleged show show the execution of an Afghan interpreter. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) wrote that the video was emblematic of Biden’s withdrawal from Afghanistan. “This horrifying image encapsulates Joe Biden’s Afghanistan catastrophe: The Taliban hanging a man from an American Blackhawk helicopter. Tragic. Unimaginable,” he wrote. Cruz has since deleted the tweet and issued something of a correction. “In what f***ing world was it a good idea to just hand over a country to these people,” wrote Rep. Dan...
    AVEZZANO, Italy (AP) — A 39-year-old man who served as a translator for the Italian military and embassy in Afghanistan says he is relieved to be safe in Italy but worries about his wife and four young children back in Kabul. He said before he left the Afghan capital, he saw Taliban fighters marking an X on the homes of people like him who had worked with Western forces during their 20-year war in Afghanistan. “They would come back the next day and either bring him to jail or kill him,’’ the refugee told The Associated Press. He asked to have his identity and image withheld for the safety of him and his family. He is one of 4,890 Afghan citizens brought to Italy after the Taliban claimed control of Kabul and Western nations launched an extraordinary airlift on Aug. 15 to evacuate citizens and local allies before the last U.S. troops pulled out by Tuesday’s deadline. Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio says Italy is housing the most evacuated Afghans of any European Union nation. The man who...
    The Afghan interpreter who helped rescue President Biden from a remote Afghan valley in 2008 has been left behind after the last US evacuation flight took off on Monday, according to a report.  Mohammed, going only by his first name for safety reasons, is hiding from the Taliban with his wife and four children after trying for years to get out of Afghanistan to no avail.   Mohammed, while working for the US Army, had a key role in a story often repeated - and embellished - by Biden during his 2008 run for vice president.  As senator, Biden was on board one of two Blackhawk helicopters that made an emergency landing in a blinding snowstorm, alongside then-Sens. John Kerry D-Mass., and Chuck Hagel, R-Neb.  Then-Senators Joe Biden, John Kerry, and Chuck Hagel in Kunar Province in eastern Afghanistan, February 20, 2008 Badri 313 units post for the cameras at Kabul airport today, carrying American-made rifles and wearing US military gear RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next No hope left: Satellite images show deserted streets...
    Credit: John Silson/U.S. Department of State. An Afghan translator who helped rescue now-President Joe Biden in 2008 is stranded inside the country, reported The Wall Street Journal on Tuesday, the day after the United States completed its withdrawal from the country after an almost-20-year war. “Hello Mr. President: Save me and my family,” Mohammed, who requested that his full name not be publicized, told the publication. “Don’t forget me here.” Mohammed, who, along with his family, has been in hiding from the Taliban, was “a 36-year-old interpreter for the U.S. Army in 2008 when two U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters made an emergency landing in Afghanistan during a blinding snowstorm,” according to WSJ. Biden was then a Democratic U.S. senator from Delaware. Along with Biden, then-Sens. John Kerry (D-MA) and Chuck Hagel (R-NE) were on board. The rest of the story went like this, according to WSJ: As a private security team with the former firm Blackwater and U.S. Army soldiers monitored for any nearby Taliban fighters, the crew sent out an urgent call for help. At Bagram Air Field,...
    A former U.S. Army officer who served in Afghanistan was overcome with emotion during an appearance on MSNBC on Tuesday, particularly while talking about the translator who helped during her service in the nearly-20-year war. On Hallie Jackson Reports, Kristen Rouse, founder of NYC Veterans Alliance, started with a message for Afghan allies now stranded in Afghanistan, which is under Taliban control: “We’re not giving up.” Our government may have left, it may seem that our government has turned away from you, that our government has turned away from the promises that we made. That we would not leave you behind, that you would have a visa if available to you if you worked with us. So many of the folks we’re in touch with, they’ve and been through bureaucratic processes for ten years and more, trying to go through this sometimes impossible rigor of paperwork and appointments and all of this bureaucracy to prove that they served with honor and that they are people of integrity, that everything, all of the documents that they have provided over and over...
    (CNN)Abdul Rashid Shirzad was quiet and nervous on the taxi ride with his family to the Kabul airport, the last American-controlled enclave in the Afghan capital. "We hope to make it, and survive," Shirzad, 34, a former interpreter for United States Special Forces, said in a video filmed as they drove through Taliban checkpoints on August 20. "It's too tough to live here. We live in fear every day." The hot air was filled with the blaring horns of cars and motorbikes, as thousands of people crammed around the airport's perimeter. Aircraft arrived and took off in the distance as desperate Afghans tried scaling the airport walls, hoping to get on an evacuation flight.This was Shirzad's second attempt at reaching the airport, after failing just days earlier due to the dense crowds. He knew it was dangerous to try again, especially with his wife and three young children in tow, but he believed staying in Afghanistan would have been a death sentence -- possibly for the whole family. As the crowds pushed forward, they became caught in the pandemonium. Shirzad...
    David Silva he gave the goal pass, provided the pause that the team needed in the second half so that the game did not get out of hand and, after being substituted, also acted as a translator of the technicians’ instructions. When Alexander sorloth I was ready to take the field and debut with the Real, Labaka he wanted to give him the last instructions on his blackboard. The problem is that the Norwegian footballer does not know Spanish and therefore Silva, who understands and speaks the language of Shakespeare After 10 years on the island, he had to act as simultaneous interpreter of the slogans of both the assistant coach and the Imanol. It is one of the most striking passages of the ‘Inside’ published by the Real regarding the match against Levante. The document also reveals the existing chemistry between various components of the Real and the Levante. Olabe chatted amicably with president granota Francisco Catalan, Januzaj did it with Bardhi and Malsa, Remiro he hugged his ex-partner on several occasions Morales and chatted with some...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Marine Corps veteran Mike Wilson worked for weeks to get his translator out of Afghanistan. They served side by side in combat in the Helmand Province for two years. “He was assigned to me to act as my eyes, ears and voice in that mission,” Wilson told WJZ Investigator Mike Hellgren. “He became an extension of me.” READ MORE: Baltimore Baker Amanda Mack Named Cook Of The Year By Southern Living Magazine A Marine veteran from Anne Arundel Co. successfully helped his translator get out of Afghanistan shortly before the attack at the Kabul airport. He hopes the translator and his family can settle in Maryland. His story next at 5 & streaming on CBSN Baltimore @wjz @AnnieRoseNews pic.twitter.com/mSb5jnm2Y9 — Mike Hellgren (@HellgrenWJZ) August 27, 2021 Wilson asked us not to name the translator for security reasons. He still has family in Kabul. The translator was finally able to get out of the Kabul airport just before the deadly bombings Thursday. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: Severe Thunderstorm Warning Issued For Baltimore & Harford Counties “He was...
    BREMEN, Germany (AP) — The two men risked their lives together nearly a decade ago trying to eliminate the Taliban, dodging bullets and forever bonding in a way that can only be forged in war. Now the American soldier and his Afghan translator were together again in Germany, shopping for a suit. Abdulhaq Sodais’s future hinges on an asylum hearing in a German court after he was denied a U.S. visa, and U.S. Army Veteran Spencer Sullivan was there to help him prepare. Together, they watched videos from Sodais’ hometown: The crackle of gunfire, dead bodies being carted off as black smoke billowed. Once U.S. troops withdrew, the fragile government built over years by people like Sodais and Sullivan collapsed in just days. “I couldn’t stop crying,” Sodais said. “My father said the Taliban were knocking on every single door in Herat looking for guys who worked for the coalition forces.” Sullivan already lost another translator, Sayed Masoud, who was killed by the Taliban while waiting for a U.S. visa. It’s a scar Sullivan carries deeply, the realization that...
    A former translator for a high-ranking U.S. Army Ranger in Afghanistan told Fox News Wednesday the Taliban have begun publicly executing allies of the U.S. in provinces away from the media attention of Kabul. The interpreter, who remained nameless for protection, warned of the Taliban retaliation on "The Faulkner Focus" and said he’s losing hope to free his family of American citizens still trapped in the country. "They are not doing really bad stuff in Kabul right now because there's a lot of media focus on Kabul, but they already started public execution in other provinces where a lot of media is not available or covering it," the interpreter said. "They started hunting down people in other provinces and they just executed a police officer yesterday and they did public hangings of four officers like last week… they are retaliating against people who sided with the U.S. and now the U.S. is leaving them behind." BIPARTISAN HOUSE PROBLEM SOLVERS CAUCUS CALLS ON BIDEN TO EXTEND AFGHANISTAN WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE PAST AUG. 31 The interpreter painted a contrasting picture of the Kabul airport...
    "Fox & Friends Weekend" host and Army veteran Pete Hegseth detailed Wednesday his journey in helping his former translator's brother get out of Afghanistan without help from the Biden administration. "My family is filled with joy and happiness right now because we know we saved Habib and his family, but we also know there are hundreds of Habibs out there right now behind the gate and they're praying, praying to get out," Afghanistan translator Saboor Sakhizaada told "Fox & Friends." "I'm in awe of Saboor. I'm in awe of what he did when I was there. He was an interpreter. He was far more than that, he was our adviser. Not just for me but for hundreds and hundreds of U.S. and NATO troops who came through where he worked," Hegseth said. Hegseth said that Saboor was "indispensable" to his unit's mission in Afghanistan.  "Nothing happened without the man that you're looking at on the screen," Hegseth said. Saboor’s triumph has "nothing to do with the Biden administration nor the State Department," Hegseth said. Hegseth credited the "courageous veterans" and...
    Tales of hope — and horror — are coming from Afghanistan. The pace of evacuations is definitely picking up. But there are thousands who remain stranded in Kabul, now run by the Taliban. Including many who have helped the U.S. military over the years.  That includes translator Faridoon Hazeen. Fox News has been tracking his progress or lack of it. He’s been turned away from the airport. He’s in hiding because the Taliban has raided his home as well as getting many threats. He fears for his life as well as his wife and four children.  "I have a feeling this is a ‘ghost city’ … a city of the ‘Walking Dead,’" he told us in a recent video message, "You can’t imagine what is going to happen next and can’t predict your situation."  Hundreds of people gather near a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane at a perimeter at the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday.  (AP) AMERICAN MOM MAKES URGENT PLEA TO BIDEN FROM AFGHANISTAN: 'WE ARE STRANDED, PLEASE HELP US' Women are also definitely in the line of...
    Posing for the camera in their party dresses, five-year-old twins Asna and Sana yesterday epitomised the successes of British rescue missions from Kabul as they prepared to begin a new life in England. The young sisters may not yet understand just how fortunate they are to escape Afghanistan amid fears that up to 1,000 face being left behind. But for their translator father, the RAF evacuation flight to Britain from Kabul was a lifeline, as he admitted the Taliban would have killed him because of his vital support for the Army. The ecstasy of the family – interpreter Nooragha Hashimi, his wife, the twins and their brother – was in stark contrast to the desperate scenes unfolding outside a temporary British processing unit at Kabul's airport, illustrating the lottery faced by those trying to reach the UK. Afghan twins Asna and Sana have been successfully evacuated from Afghanistan to the UK  Pictured: The five-year-old twins are seen on their evacuation flight in a British plane  Two children separated from parents at Kabul airportin Afghanistan  Under a volley...
    The brother of an Afghan translator who worked for American forces during the war is being sentenced to death for helping provide security to his brother in yet another sign that the Taliban's new 'moderate' façade has already crumbled. News of the letter emerges as Vice President Kamala Harris announced that now was not the time to analyze the withdrawal of the Biden administration from the war-torn country, but instead to focus on evacuation. CNN confirmed the translator, who has not been named, worked with the US Army, and that his brother, also unnamed, had been sentenced to death. The outlet obtained three letters the brother received within the last three months. The first letter is an order to appear at a court hearing.   'You have been accused of helping the Americans,' the first letter says. 'You are also accused of providing security to your brother, who has been an interpreter.' The second letter is a notice of his failure to appear for the hearing. The brother of an Afghan translator faces the death penalty for his brother's service to the...
    The brother of an Afghan translator who worked for the U.S. has reportedly been sentenced to death after he was accused of helping and hiding his brother, according to CNN. In one letter from the Taliban to the unidentified victim, the terrorist organization alleged that the victim is “accused of helping the Americans” and “providing security to your brother … who has been an interpreter for the Infidel Crusaders,” CNN reported Monday. The victim was then told to appear at a court hearing, however, a subsequent letter said that he did not show for his court appearance and his case was sent to the Sharia Court where he will no longer have the right to object to his case, the outlet reported. “You chose this path for yourself,” the letter reads, according to the copy obtained by CNN. A final letter condemns the brother to death. “We found you guilty in absentia and sent your file to an upper Sharia Court where you shall be sentenced to death,” the letter reportedly reads. “These court decisions are final and you will...
    iOS 15, the new version of the operating system for the iPhone, presents small news that, a priori, can go unnoticed. However, many of these functions manage to be very useful on a day-to-day basis. One of them is the possibility of translate any text, even the one that appears in images, quickly. In iOS 14, Apple already has its own translator. This, however, is only available through an app or through Safari, giving the possibility of translating website content into another language. With iOS 15, the translator adds to any text modifiable. It can therefore be used in a large number of apps. To translate any element, you just need to select the word or phrase. Then a options menu in the upper area of ​​the text. Click on the arrow icon and then on the “translate” button. The iOS translator will open to the same page. Now, you just have to accept the permissions of the translator to show the meaning in the default language of your iPhone. it’s possible change the language through the...
    CNN obtained a message from the Taliban illustrating the threat they pose to Afghan citizens who helped the United States before the fall of Kabul. During Monday’s edition New Day, CNN’s Brianna Keilar read a letter that the Taliban sent to the brother of an Afghan translator who worked with U.S. troops. The CNN anchor noted that the letter — the last of three sent to the man — was effectively a death sentence, as it promised capital punishment to Afghans known to have worked with Americans. “These court decisions are final and you will not have the right to object,” Keilar said, reading the letter. “You chose this path for yourself and your death is imminent, God willing.” As the Taliban continues to establish its hold over Afghanistan, the country remains in chaos as thousands of citizens are attempting to flee. This has prompted a great deal of conversation about whether Afghan refugees will be relocated to the U.S. or elsewhere, with numerous diverse and contentious opinions on the matter already having been voiced. Watch above, via CNN. Have...
    (CNN)The Taliban have sentenced the brother of an Afghan translator to death, according to letters obtained by CNN, accusing him of helping the US and providing security to his brother, who served as an interpreter to American troops. A former service member who worked with the translator confirmed his service and his brother's plight. The letters are just one example of how the Taliban are directly threatening Afghans who worked with the US or are family members of those who have, leaving them scrambling to flee the country in the wake of the Taliban takeover. "You have been accused of helping the Americans," the Taliban wrote in the first of three letters to the Afghan man, adding, "You are also accused of providing security to your brother, who has been an interpreter." The first letter from the Taliban, which is hand written, orders the man to appear for a hearing.Read MoreThe second handwritten letter is a notice of his failure to appear for the hearing. In the third letter, which is typed, the Taliban notify the man that because he...
    Former Afghan translator on MSNBC's The Reidout. Qismat Amin is safe. Tragically, his family is not. The former Afghan translator tells BuzzFeed News that he’s spent multiple sleepless nights worried about his family in Jalalabad. A brother is also a former translator. His name is not revealed for his own safety. “The family has taken to hiding in their home, he said, leaving only to get food when necessary,” the report said. “His mother has stashed all of his brother’s documents in case someone comes looking for them.” During a Thursday appearance on MSNBC’s The Reidout, Amin said his brother can’t make the roughly two-hour journey from Jalalabad to Kabul to even try to see if he could get an evacuation flight. “All these checkpoints are being controlled by Taliban,” Amin said. Carrying documents indicating work with the American government could be incredibly dangerous. “The odds are that they will find you.” International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP) Policy Director Sunil Varghese told BuzzFeed News that the organization has received “desperate messages” from other Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) applicants who are also stranded in Afghanistan. The report said that the group this week...
    MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow was brought to tears as she shared the story of a translator in Afghanistan who desperately tried to escape the country  — with the Taliban seizing control. On Wednesday night, Maddow focused part of her show on Major Tom Schueman of the U.S. Marines, who worked frantically for months to help get his former interpreter — whom he refers to as Zak — out of the country. Schueman has spoken to the media about his public attempts to help get Zak and his family onto a plane, and Maddow flagged several of his Instagram Posts describing Zak’s effort to flee.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by @kill.z0n3 Maddow continued to highlight Schueman’s social media posts, honing in on where he said Zak’s family got “so close” to getting on a plane, but “they didn’t make it.” She became noticeably emotional as she implored her audience to do anything they can and contact anyone they know who can help Afghan refugees attempting to flee. “This is not how this was supposed to...
    Clarissa Ward kept her cool while interviewing an Afghan translator as gunshots could be heard on the streets of Kabul in both a stunning and enlightening live report Wednesday afternoon for CNN’s New Day. Doing live shots from a wartorn or unstable location on the other side of the planet is a relatively new thing brought about by technology, but the greater wonder is how Ward kept her cool amidst the apparent chaos and gunfire. Early in the shot, viewers could hear the shots and see Ward understandably flinch as the gunshots appeared to be close by. But as Ward explained, she understood the Taliban were firing weapons in the air as means of crowd control and not firing into crowds. Nonetheless, as she explains, firing above a crowd is when people get hurt. She then featured two Afghan men, both of whom spoke English, who explained in painful detail their current frustration with trying to seek refuge by evacuating the wartorn and now extremist-run nation. The first individual explained his frustration and shared this message to CNN’s viewers: ‘Our...
    It was midnight, at the end of a dreadful day. I had dodged my way along back roads, then main roads, trying to avoid Taliban checkpoints in a desperate bid to reach Kabul airport to try and find any information about flights to the UK. The two-hour journey had been a mistake. Not only did I have to run the gauntlet of triumphant, often aggressive, Taliban fighters as they randomly searched vehicles and fearful passengers – pedestrians, too – but when I arrived I had become caught up in the chaos at Kabul international airport. Hundreds of my fellow countrymen, young and old, were seeking information on how to escape our homeland. It was brutally hot and everyone was nervous. We felt the eyes of men who had been our enemy staring into us with the cold eyes of a victor. At each gate to the airport – there were five in all – I had asked for the British. I had spent six years working with them as their interpreter, but the unsmiling Turkish guards would let no one...
    An Afghan translator who worked with U.S. troops told CNN’s Brianna Keilar on Monday morning that his family is allegedly stuck in Afghanistan and fearing for their lives. Mike Sahak was able to immigrate to the U.S. but said his family is still trapped in the country and that he has had trouble reaching them in the past few days. Sahak said his family is “very much scared” and “in a state of shock.” He explained that when he asked them questions about food and shelter, they could answer some questions but not all of them. (RELATED: US Embassy Says There Are ‘Deeply Disturbing’ Reports Of Taliban Executing Afghan Troops, ‘Could Constitute War Crimes’) Afghan translator who accompanied US troops on hundreds if not thousands of combat missions is desperate to save his family from the Taliban. They are in hiding, fearing for their lives. He is now a college student in the US and is still coming up empty as he tried to save them. pic.twitter.com/eTfAFNfrjy — Brianna Keilar (@brikeilarcnn) August 16, 2021 “My family had to relocate...
    An Afghan translator who helped U.S. forces in the region now fears for his life as the Taliban terrorist group continues its takeover of the Middle Eastern country.  "I don’t want to die," Faridoon Hazeen wrote to Fox News in an email.   He later said on the phone, "I feel like a man drowning….I am reaching out to anything and anyone to save me."  The 39-year-old father of four is just one of the thousands of people in Afghanistan who could be at the top of a kill list if the Taliban were to fully take over the country.   He has been trying for years to get a U.S. visa, with no luck.  Recently, he’s emailed the U.S. embassy in Kabul four times but with no clear response.  President Biden said recently amid the troop withdrawal that Afghan translators are welcome in the U.S., although he said bringing them here would take action from Congress.  "And that’s why we’re asking Congress to consider changing the law. But in the meantime, we can guarantee their safety if they wish to leave...
    By Jacopo prisco (CNN) – Skype users will soon be able to make voice and video calls backed by near-real-time translation technology. While you still can’t guarantee that fine details won’t be lost in translation, Microsoft’s new idea for its video chat platform certainly feels like something out of science fiction. Our hopes for such a wonder will no longer be pinned on imaginary aquatic creatures; the Babel fish from Intergalactic Traveler’s Guide, or improbable “telepathic fields,” such as the one emitted by the TARDIS from Doctor Who to transmit any alien language to its pilot and convert it into plain English. In fact, it all sounds quite similar to what the Klingons in Star Trek use to make their generally belligerent intentions stand out pretty clear: a “universal translator” that is not seen but is always present. “The idea that people don’t understand each other, that’s going to be a thing of the past,” Gurdeep Pall, Skype’s corporate vice president, told CNN’s Richard Quest. “Just as before it was hard to imagine a world where you could...
    YouTube Linda Park as Hoshi Sato in "Star Trek: Enterprise" “Star Trek’s” universal translators are one of the most crucial tools in the Trekverse. Without them, contact with new species would be impossible. As the name implies, the universal translators interpret different humans and alien languages and convert them into English, the default language of the future. In the 2150s, the time period of “Star Trek Enterprise,” universal translators were still an experimental technology, and they often failed. Linguistics expert Hoshi Sato often used her own expertise to assist and enhance the universal translator’s programming. A century later, in the time period of “Star Trek: Discovery” and “Star Trek: The Original Series,” the universal translators were essential tools of space exploration. They were programmed with more than 1,000 languages, as Commander Michael Burnham told a Kelpian in the episode “The Sound of Thunder.” The devices used this linguistic database as a basis for translating brand new languages. By the 2300s — the time of “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” and “Star Trek: Voyager”...
    A terrified former British military translator trapped in Lashkar Gah told of seeing bodies on the streets yesterday – as the battleground city stood on the brink of falling to the Taliban. Sharif Karimi, 31, who worked for three years beside UK troops, described a 'hell' where desperate families were fleeing from their homes, which were then seized by insurgent fighters as bases to launch rocket attacks. The father of four said: 'It is a terrifying situation and the Taliban has made big gains so they control sections of the city where you can see their fighters openly walking around.  Former British military translator Sharif Karimi, 31, who worked for three years beside UK troops, described seeing bodies on the streets of Lashkar Gah on Tuesday RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Biden administration expands Afghan refugee program to... The injustice that may cost David Cameron's translator his... Share this article Share 'We fear they will seek revenge on those who worked for Western forces, they will show no mercy. There are...
    The design changes coming with Android 12 seem to affect all of its apps and services. The last thing that has been known is that the Google translator would have a new interface adapted to Material You. Google is still launching trial versions of the new version of its operating system and, is that Android 12 should officially reach compatible devices in the fall of this year. This version of Android is focused on color and design, so much so that many applications and services are going to receive a complete remodel. The last thing that was just known is that the Google translator is within this list of design changes. The discovery comes from the hand of XDA-Developers, who have searched and found the changes that will reach the Google translator. These changes are not going to be subtle and, the truth is, Google Translate has been for several generations with a really outdated design that does not match the current aesthetics of Android. It seems that the time for change is now, with the arrival of Android 12...
    The Taliban beheaded an Afghan man who had worked as a translator for the U.S. Army, according to reports. Sohail Pardis, 32, had been driving from his home in Kabul on May 12 to pick up his sister ahead of Eid, a Muslim holiday, according to The Sun. AFGHANISTAN MINSTRY SETS CURFEW IN BID TO CURB TALIBAN ATTACKS But on the drive, Pardis — who had told friends he was receiving Taliban death threats because the terror group suspected him of being a spy — was stopped at a checkpoint manned by the militant group. "They were telling him you are a spy for the Americans, you are the eyes of the Americans and you are infidel, and we will kill you and your family," his friend and co-worker Abdulhaq Ayoubi told CNN. Pardis tried to drive through but wasn’t seen again. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP The Red Crescent relief organization reported that villagers said the Taliban shot at his car — and once it stopped, pulled him out and beheaded him. Pardis had worked for the...
    The killing of a former military translator by the Taliban has sparked new alarm among interpreters fearing attacks as Western forces pull out of Afghanistan. Sohail Pardis is reported to have been beheaded by extremists after he was attacked outside Kabul.  His family said he was dragged from his vehicle after being shot as he tried to escape a Taliban checkpoint on a road in Khost. Witnesses said he was beaten, shot and beheaded. Sohail Pardis is reported to have been beheaded by extremists after he was attacked outside Kabul Mr Pardis, 30, the father of a nine-year-old daughter, had worked as an interpreter for US forces for 16 months and had applied to be relocated on security grounds to America. He was rejected because he had been dismissed. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Top General Mark Milley says Taliban have 'strategic... Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley insists the military... Share this article Share At least seven ex-Coalition translators have been killed this year, taking the total since 2014 to more...
    Former interpreters who assisted U.S. and NATO forces at a demonstration in Kabul in April. Mirza Sayeed Nayab was a translator for U.S. military forces in Afghanistan for four years. But military news outlet Task & Purpose reports that a simple paperwork error on his application—his former supervisor omitted a date and time—has not only ruined his chances of securing a Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) to the United States, it may also put his life in danger. While the Biden administration will begin evacuating some Afghan allies and their families through Operation Allies Rescue starting next week, he will not be among them, despite his four years of service to the U.S. “Nayab is one of an untold number of Afghans who have worked for the United States but are not eligible to be evacuated because they aren’t in the application pipeline for Special Immigrant Visas.” Nayab told Task & Purpose he tried to rectify the issue, unsuccessfully searching for his former supervisor for two years before trying to resubmit his application again. But it was again rejected by the U.S., for the same reason. Task &...
    SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES coach Matias Almeyda saw his TRANSLATOR given a red card for arguing during a heated MLS clash with Colorado Rapids on Saturday night. Tempers began to fray throughout the game before reaching fever pitch midway through the second half. 2Translator Agustin Zalazar was sent off for dissent after rowing with the ref 2Zalazar was forced to watch the final 20 minutes of the game from the stands for his protestations With the game evenly-poised at 1-1, Argentine boss Almeyda rushed to confront officials with just 20 minutes to play. Almeyda was shown a yellow card for his remonstrations. But his translator Agustin Zalazar - who serves as head of coaching communications for the MLS side - was shown a RED for protesting too aggressively. Zalazar was forced to spend the rest of the match in the stands. As such, Almeyda was unable to properly communicate with his squad as they ultimately played out a 1-1 draw. The result leaves San Jose down in 11th in the 13-team Western Conference - four points adrift of the play-off places. It...
12