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    Dogs may be even smarter than we think – as research suggests they are able to read our minds. Scientists have discovered dogs can tell when a human has done something on purpose and when they have made a mistake. Researchers at Germany’s Max Planck Institute recruited 51 dogs of various breeds who sat on one side of a clear plastic barrier which had a hole in it for a human on the other side to put a treat through. Research by scientists at Germany's Max Planck Institute studied dogs of various breeds and found that dogs can tell if humans have done something on purpose of if it was a mistake The human either suddenly withdrew the food, appeared to want to give the treat but ‘accidentally’ dropped it before the gap or wanted to give the treat but the gap was blocked. The researchers timed how long it took each dog to walk around the barrier to get the food. Those whose food was purposefully taken away took 33 per cent longer. The researchers, whose study is...
    On March 18 of this year the United States Space Force reported an incident in low Earth orbit. The Chinese satellite Yunhai 1-02 lost a number of pieces after what appeared to be an impact or malfunction of the device. Five months later the problem was found: the remains of a 1996 Russian rocket damaged the satellite, demonstrating the problem that space debris can pose. Yunhai 1-02 was launched in September 2019 from the Gobi desert. Its purpose in space is to collect satellite images for meteorological, environmental, and other experiments. When it was launched it was certainly not expected that its useful life would end a year and a half later. But it happened. The satellite was damaged on March 18, 2021 unexpectedly. It is not clear if it is still working or the Chinese Space Agency has asked for control of it. Object 48078 Due to the safety of these operations, gwhat has actually happened is generally not reported to the public. Space agencies do not usually discuss issues like these publicly unless they have a direct impact...
    As if coping with midnight feeds and 3am nappy changes wasn’t hard enough, scientists now say that sleepless nights can age new mothers by up to seven years. Research suggests that lack of sleep in the first six months after a baby is born speeds up ageing. Regularly getting less than seven hours of sleep a night can leave a woman’s body between three and seven years older, the study found. Researcher Dr Judith Carroll urged new mothers to grab some shut-eye when they can – and enlist the help of grandparents where possible. As if coping with midnight feeds and 3am nappy changes wasn’t hard enough, scientists now say that sleepless nights can age new mothers by up to seven years [File photo] In the first study of its kind, she asked 33 mothers of one-year-olds how much sleep they had got since their babies were born. More than half were getting fewer than seven hours a night. Dr Carroll also took samples of the women’s blood and analysed it for tiny changes to their DNA. These changes are...
    (CNN)The most severe symptoms that come with MIS-C, the rare but serious Covid-19 related condition, seem to resolve within six months after hospitalization, according to a new small study of patients at one hospital in London. Some childrens hospitals see a surge in rare Covid-19 complication MIS-CThe study published Monday in the journal The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health looked at half a year's worth of results from nearly 46 children who were treated for MIS-C, or what is also known in the UK as PIMS-TS, which stands for Pediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome.Six months after they were discharged from the hospital, most children in the study didn't seem to have a continuation of the severe symptoms that have been associated with this condition such as stomach problems, inflammation, heart abnormalities and neurological issues.A few symptoms lingered for some children in that follow up period. Six children still had stomach problems. Two had some heart abnormalities. One child still had some systematic inflammation. Eighteen of the children had some small neurological abnormalities, but it didn't seem to impact their ability...
    The pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 'carefully planned' his flight path to avoid leaving clues about where the doomed plane was going before plunging into the Indian Ocean, new research suggests. Pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah, who was reportedly clinically depressed, deliberately changed direction and speed to avoid 'giving a clear idea where he was heading', claims aerospace engineer Richard Godfrey.  The Boeing 777 vanished from radar screens as it was flying from Kuala Lumpar to Beijing on March 8 2014, resulting in the loss of all 239 people on board.  The plane took an unexpected U-turn from its planned flight path and was instead tracked on military radar over the Malacca Strait before losing contact.   'In case the aircraft was detected, the pilot also avoided giving a clear idea where he was heading by using a flight path with a number of changes of direction,' Mr Godfrey said in his report.  Pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah, who was reportedly clinically depressed, deliberately changed direction and speed to avoid 'giving a clear idea where he was heading', claims aerospace...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Spring and pollen go hand in hand, something Chris Whitley can’t help but notice. “You go outside, you’re trying to clean up the yard, and the nose just starts to clog up,” he said. “The eyes are itching, they water, it’s hard to see, you can build up pressure in your ears and your face. The post-nasal drip’s no fun.” READ MORE: Omni William Penn Hotel To Begin Accepting Reservations Again In April Now researchers have found COVID-19 infection rates and pollen counts can track together, too. “Thirty-one countries, 130 regions across five continents, so it’s something that tends to occur everywhere,” says Allergy and Clinical Immunology allergist Dr. James DeAngelo. This allergist has noticed it’s not just coronavirus. “I have always seen an increase in viral infections that correlate with pollen,” he said. “These are influenza, common cold and other viruses.” While asymptomatic people may unknowingly spread coronavirus with allergic sneezing, issues in the nasal passages and airways could play a role in susceptibility. READ MORE: COVID-19 In Pennsylvania: State Orders Vaccine Providers To...
    Face masks used to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus as well as protecting yourself from the deadly disease have become an important tool in the past year that has been the COVID-19 pandemic. Though they’re necessary and useful, face masks — namely the disposable kind that are made of plastic microfibers — could be contributing to the world’s ongoing plastic problem, suggests new research.  Nearly 130 billion face masks are used globally each month, translating to about 3 million a minute, according to recent studies. But with many of these masks being disposable and made of plastic microfibers, and few to no guidelines on mask recycling, "it is urgent to recognize this potential environmental threat and prevent it from becoming the next plastic problem," say researchers from the University of Southern Denmark and Princeton University, in a new study.  In a study recently published in the journal Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering, researchers warned that disposable masks made with plastic microfibers "cannot be readily biodegraded but may fragment into smaller plastic particles, namely micro-and nano plastics that...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- For months, doctors have cautioned that obese patients who have COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized and need to be on ventilators.And obesity can also raise the risk of death from coronavirus by as much as 50%.That's why researchers are now looking at bariatric surgery as a way to lower those risks. Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries are known as bariatric surgery.They involve making changes to your digestive system to help you lose weight.And bariatric surgery is done when diet and exercise have not worked or when there are serious health problems because of a person's weight.Experts estimate that more than 70% of American adults are overweight or obese, and doctors say it can impair the immune system and increase the risk of serious illness from the coronavirus.Dr. Ali Aminian is the director of the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute at Cleveland Clinic."COVID-19 has been a wake-up call that's shown the health consequences of obesity," he said.A study done by Dr. Aminian and his colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic followed the cases of 363 COVID-19...
    NEANDERTHALS could talk like modern humans, researchers suggest. They had a “type of language” which went far beyond the grunts of cavemen and the “oohs” of chimpanzees. 3New research suggests Neanderthals could talk just like modern humansCredit: Alamy Our primitive cousins had good hearing and were capable of voicing tricky consonants, as well as easier vowels, experts in Spain discovered. These included the most difficult sounds such as 'th', 'w', 'b' and 'v'. A team made a virtual 3D reconstruction of a Neanderthal’s ears from fossils. They compared its workings to other replicas — one representing their earlier “hominin” ancestor, the other, Homo sapiens. Neanderthals — who lived until about 40,000 years ago — were found to have “similar hearing and speech capacity to modern humans”. Madrid-based Professor Mercedes Conde-Valverde said: “It’s the first robust palaeontological evidence of speech outside of our own species.” The idea Neanderthals could speak was first rejected in 1989 after the discovery of the hyoid bone in their neck. 3A 3D virtual reconstruction shows the ear in a modern human (left) and the Amud...
    (CNN)Forget those brutish caveman grunts. Neanderthals, our closest ancestors, could have produced the same sounds as humans today, according to a study modeling the hearing ability of the Stone Age hominins that went extinct about 40,000 years ago. Whether Neanderthals, and other human ancestors, were capable of sophisticated spoken language has been a topic of long-standing debate in human evolution. New research published on Monday suggests that Neanderthals had a vocal communication system that could have been similar to human speech. "Neandertals could have produced all the sounds in that frequency range, like we can. There does not seem to be any difference in their ability to produce speech sounds. So they definitely could have said 'hello' or 'ok' if those utterances had any meaning for them," said Rolf Quam, an associate professor and director of the evolutionary studies program at Binghampton University in New York, in an email.Did you survive Covid? Maybe you can thank your Neanderthal ancestorsStudying the evolution of language is notoriously tricky, the researchers said, given that the soft tissue that forms brains and vocal tracts...
    Humans may be to blame for the sneaky mouse, a study found. Researchers looked at three populations of house mice which have been living with humans, in early farms and boats, for between 3,000 and 11,000 years. The mice which have been with us the longest were best at problem-solving tasks such as opening a lid or the window of a Lego house to get a tasty mealworm.   Researchers looked at three populations of house mice (stock image) which have been living with humans, in early farms and boats, for between 3,000 and 11,000 years  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Stillborn baby likely died from Covid after being infected... Children's Commissioner says ministers are IGNORING the... Share this article Share Experts at Bielefeld University in Germany believe house mice evolved enhanced cognitive abilities because they rely on people for food and shelter.  Just like blue tits which learned to peck through the foil tops of milk bottles, the rodents became adaptable because we are so noisy, disruptive and unpredictable. The authors...
    (CNN)Five thousand years after Stonehenge was built, archaeologists have finally pinpointed exactly where the bluestones that form part of the imposing UK monument came from and how they were unearthed.The researchers revealed in 2019 the stones came from an ancient quarry on the north side of the Preseli Hills in western Wales, which meant the 43 huge bluestones had been moved a staggering distance of 150 miles. Archaeologists discover the likely source of Stonehenges giant sarsen stonesNow, archaeologists have said they think some of the bluestones first formed another stone circle close to the same area as the quarries and were dismantled and rebuilt as part of Stonehenge on the Salisbury Plain. The identical 110-meter diameters of the stone circle, known as Waun Mawn, and the enclosing ditch of Stonehenge, suggest that at least part of the circle was brought from its location in Wales to Salisbury Plain, according to new research published in the journal Antiquity. This stone hole was uncovered at Waun Mawn, with the stone packing used to secure the missing monolith still present.What's more, both stone...
    Listening to soothing music and words while you’re unconscious on the operating table could mean you wake up in less pain. That’s the finding from new research, published in The BMJ, which looked at whether playing relaxing music and recordings of positive comments, such as ‘You are safe now and in good care’, to patients under general anaesthetic had any impact on their recovery. Astonishingly, it did. The patients who were played the sounds via headphones reported 25 per cent less pain than those who had surgery in silence, the results showed. Listening to soothing music and words while you’re unconscious on the operating table could mean you wake up in less pain They were also 17 per cent less likely to need opioid painkillers such as morphine — the family of drugs most commonly used post-surgery — during the first 24 hours after the operation. The study is based on the theory that while we are seemingly out for the count, we are actually in a state of ‘connected consciousness’.  This means that although we are not awake during...
    Searching for a way to make your point? Then look no further than your hands. Gestures such as slicing the air or waving can make what we are saying more memorable, according to scientists. It may explain politicians’ annoying habit of making chopping motions to emphasise words in their speeches – and why people in some countries such as Italy tend to gesticulate when they speak. Scientists suggest gestures such as slicing the air or waving can make what we are saying more memorable The research shows gestures can affect the sounds people hear, for example making vowels seem longer. So waving while saying ‘bit’ could make it sound more like ‘beat’. And a vigorous hand movement could make ‘code’ sound more like ‘coat’, according to the scientists from Germany’s Max Planck Institute. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Swampy and pals dig a tunnel to stop HS2: Activists spend... 'Fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, sons and... Share this article Share Writing in the Royal Society Journal, they said chopping motions –...
    Cases of COVID-19 have been rising among children and young adults since October, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in new research that suggests that college reopenings may have worsened outbreaks. The agency said that while opening elementary and high schools does not lead to a surge in new cases, reopening colleges and universities might. The study, released Wednesday, examined cases from March 1 until Dec. 12 and found that cases were highest among young people in December. In the week of Dec 6-12, reported infections ranged from 99.9 cases per 100,000 among ages 0-4 to 379.3 among ages 18-24. Part of the explanation may be due to higher testing among children as the pandemic wore on. In the week beginning May 31, 435,434 tests were given to ages 0-24. By the week beginning Dec 6, over 2.2 million tests were given. But it cannot be explained entirely by testing. Tests for COVID-19 among children and young adults began to increase steadily in August. The current increase among young people didn’t begin until October, when a nationwide...
    Pelvic floor exercise is not just for postpartum women. DragonImages/Getty Images I was at the gym until delivery with my now two-year-old, because I suspected that exercise would keep us both at our healthiest. New researcher suggests that when obese moms exercise during pregnancy, it can impact their childrens' DNA. Researchers will study the exact impact of the epigenetic changes in the future. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. It was my due date with my second child, and I was laying on my back, legs lifted into the air. I wasn't in the hospital delivering. I was at the gym, completing what I could of a TRX class that I'd been attending throughout my pregnancy.  "See you Thursday," the instructor said as everyone rolled up their mats and began filtering out of the studio.   "Hopefully not!" I replied.  Throughout my adult life, I've loved going to the gym. Being active has huge health benefits, and in my case I feel it's particularly important. I'm obese, and probably always will be. Although I'd be a prime candidate...
    They are taken each day by millions of Britons in the belief they will boost health. But research suggests any benefits to the 'worried well' from vitamin pills and mineral supplements may all be in the mind. A study of 21,600 people found there was no measurable clinical improvements between those who took supplements and those who did not.  Scientists said any benefits are explained by the 'positive expectation' of effectiveness, rather than hard evidence – and most people who take the products are the 'worried well', who are already healthier than others. A study of 21,600 people found there was no measurable clinical improvements between those who took supplements and those who did not (stock picture) The supplements industry is worth billions of pounds globally. Up to 24million Britons – 46 per cent of adults – pop daily vitamin pills. Experts accept that supplements can be crucial if someone has a known vitamin or mineral deficiency. But a series of clinical trials has failed to identify health benefits for those who do not have such a deficiency.  RELATED...
    Living in a polluted area significantly raises the risk of dementia, according to the world's largest study on the issue. Scientists found that the higher the level of toxic air in a postcode, the more likely its residents are to be hospitalised with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. The research showed that any air pollution – even within 'safe' limits – is linked to neurological diseases. The study by Harvard University, published yesterday in the Lancet Planetary Health journal, drew on data from 63 million adults.  Pollution can significantly raise the risk of dementia, a new study has found (stock image) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Board games, going to the cinema and other social activities... Cold water swimming may help defend from dementia by... Share this article Share It is the strongest evidence that dirty urban air can damage the brain. Air pollution is already known to cause lung disease, asthma and heart disease, cutting short around 40,000 lives a year in the UK. The study analysed the link between progressive...
    Space weather may have played a part in the Titanic disaster, according to new research. In the research published in the Royal Meteorological Society’s journal Weather, Mila Zinkova writes that space weather may have affected the Titanic’s navigation and communication prior to the disaster, as well as impacting the rescue operation. “The significant space weather event was in the form of a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm that observational evidence suggests was in effect in the North Atlantic at the time of the tragedy,” Zinkova writes, in an abstract of the study. The Titanic struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic at 11:40 p.m. ship’s time on April 14, 1912, during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York. The liner sank just over two hours later with the loss of more than 1,500 lives. Zinkova, who is described by the Science Times as an independent weather researcher and retired computer programmer, has published a number of research papers on the Titanic. There have been other examples of space weather impacting systems on Earth. On Sept. 2, 1859, space...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — New findings show a twist on the traditional Mediterranean diet may be ideal for cardiovascular health. It’s called the “Pesco-Mediterranean diet,” which is rich in plants, nuts, whole grains, and extra virgin olive oil. It also emphasizes seafood as the main protein. New research in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology says the diet is beneficial. “We have a lot of first-level scientific evidence showing that this really makes the difference in your cardiovascular health, in all causes of mortality in preventing dementia, preventing diabetes and maintaining a healthy weight,” said Preventive Cardiologist Dr. James O’Keefe. Intermittent fasting is also recommended as part of the diet.
    Groundbreaking new evidence suggests COVID-19 patients develop lasting, long-term immunity after infection, according to new study released on Friday. What are the details? Business Insider reported that some scientists believe the benefits of long-term immunity against the coronavirus will be beneficial to reducing the contagion of the coronavirus. Initial research indicated that antibodies in COVID-19 patients could fade within months of infection — but new research from medical journal Cell says white blood cells — which help fight infections — have a "muscle memory" and could return to fight off second infections. In particular, memory T cells — effector cells that help identify and eradicate infectious cells and relay information to B cells about how to fight the pathogen upon each subsequent infection — are instrumental in maintaining a balanced and healthy immune system and remain in the system for years after initial infection. The study's authors explained, "Memory T cells will likely prove critical for long-term immune protection against COVID-19. Such cells, according to the study, may also "prevent recurrent...
    (CNN)How did the zebra get its stripes? The fashionable patterned coat protects the animal from horsefly bites by disorienting the flies during the landing process, research has shown. But how exactly do the stripes accomplish that? Now scientists can eliminate one theory, according to a new study published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the Royal Society journal. Researchers looked at the nature of the disorientation effect in flies, and ruled out the hypothesis that a common optical illusion known as "aperture effect" has a role in dazzling them."Not only do these exciting studies bring us closer to understanding one of the world's most iconic and photogenic species, they will be of great interest to farmers attempting to reduce the damage caused by fly bites and even general horse-wear companies," said Tim Caro, a senior co-author of the study and a professor at the University of Bristol's School of Biological Sciences, in a release. Stripes, checkers and the aperture effectRead MoreCaro and his colleague Martin How, a Bristol research fellow, have put zebra-print coats on domestic horses for their research, a...
    Heart patients should not use fitness watches because they do more harm than good, researchers said yesterday. Owners of devices such as Fitbits become more in tune with their health but suffer guilt and anxiety when they miss exercise targets or misinterpret data. They may link a fast pulse with an increased risk of heart attack or fear that a lower than usual amount of sleep will exacerbate their illness. Dr Tariq Osman Andersen said: ‘Our study shows that, overall, self-measurements are more problematic than beneficial when it comes to the patient experience. Owners of devices such as Fitbits become more in tune with their health but suffer guilt and anxiety when they miss exercise targets or misinterpret data ‘Patients begin to use the information from their Fitbits just as they would use a doctor. However, they don’t get help interpreting their watch data. This makes them unnecessarily anxious, or they may learn something that is far from reality.’ Published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the study examined 27 heart patients who used fitness watches to measure...
    (CNN)The formula for how Covid-19 relief funding from the federal government gets allocated to hospitals across the United States could have a "disparate impact" on hospitals in counties with a higher-than-average share of Black residents, new research suggests.In other words, hospitals in those counties received the same amount of funding as counties with less health and financial needs, according to the research letter published in the medical journal JAMA on Friday.JUST WATCHEDHouse approves $3 trillion Covid-19 aid billReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHHouse approves $3 trillion Covid-19 aid bill 02:43In March, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security or CARES Act was passed, which included $175 billion in relief funding for hospitals and health care providers on the frontlines of the coronavirus response. In a statement emailed to CNN on Monday, a spokesperson for the US Department of Health and Human Services said that HHS "has distributed funds in a data-driven manner" based on the impact of Covid-19.For the new research letter, researchers from Harvard University, the University of Chicago and the University of California, Berkeley, examined how Covid-19 relief funding gets...
    George DvorskyJust now•Filed to:Ancient GreeceAncient Greecedisability accessancient architectureancient templesscienceArchitectureSaveReconstruction of the rotunda at the Temple of Asclepius at EpidaurusImage: 2019 John Goodinson. Scientific advisor John Svolos. Anasynthesis Project Ramps at ancient Greek healing temples provided access for people with disabilities, according to new research. If confirmed, this would be the earliest evidence of a society making architectural adjustments to support accessibility. Ramps at the entrances of ancient Greek temples are common, but as new research published today in Antiquity argues, some of these ramps, particularly those built at healing sanctuaries, or asclepieia, served as an accessible entrance. Archaeologist Debby Sneed, the lone author of the new study and a professor at California State University, says these ancient ramps, which are fairly common, have largely been neglected by scholars. After studying the distribution of these ramps at several temples in ancient Greece, Sneed noticed a pattern, namely an increased presence at healing sanctuaries. “In organizing and constructing sanctuaries, [the ancient Greeks] considered the sort of ‘average visitor,’” Sneed told Gizmodo. “At a non-healing sanctuary, your ‘average visitor’ may not...
    Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months, according to research. The findings suggest that, like the common cold and flu, the virus could infect people on an annual basis.  This undermines ideas that herd immunity could be a way of defeating the virus. King’s College London scientists looked at the immune response of more than 90 patients and healthcare workers at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS foundation trust. Immunity to Covid-19 might be lost within months according to new research which shows coronavirus could infect people on an annual basis like the common cold RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Century-old BCG vaccine used to eradicate tuberculosis DOES... Air pollution resurges in London, Paris and Rome as... Covid-19 vaccine could be ready within a year if trials are... Maryland man says he may be first person successfully... Share this article Share 126 shares They found antibody levels peaked three weeks after symptoms and then declined. Lead author Dr Katie Doores told the Guardian: ‘People are producing a reasonable antibody...
    (CNN) — A gut-wrenching experience. Butterflies in your stomach. Many of us instinctively feel the connection between our gut and our brain. That connection and how the range of bacteria residing in our digestive tract — our microbiome — might help treat mental illness has become a field of interest for scientists in recent years. A new review of medical literature has suggested that probiotics — foods or supplements containing microbes thought to exert a positive influence on our gut — could help ease depression. “This is good quality research but it is a review of relatively preliminary data,” Allan Young, a professor of mood disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, told the Science Media Centre in London. “So while this systematic review of the research literature supports the notion that pre and probiotics may be helpful for people with anxiety and depression, more research is needed. These data do make a case for larger trials to be carried out,” said Young, who wasn’t involved in the review. The researchers from the University of Brighton and...
    (CNN)A gut-wrenching experience. Butterflies in your stomach.Many of us instinctively feel the connection between our gut and our brain. That connection and how the range of bacteria residing in our digestive tract -- our microbiome -- might help treat mental illness has become a field of interest for scientists in recent years. A new review of medical literature has suggested that probiotics -- foods or supplements containing microbes thought to exert a positive influence on our gut -- could help ease depression. Probiotics dont do much for most peoples gut health despite the hype, review finds"This is good quality research but it is a review of relatively preliminary data," Allan Young, a professor of mood disorders at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, told the Science Media Centre in London."So while this systematic review of the research literature supports the notion that pre and probiotics may be helpful for people with anxiety and depression, more research is needed. These data do make a case for larger trials to be carried out," said Young, who wasn't...
    Houston, 2017 It is largely understood that throughout the United States, federal flood risk maps significantly understate the true extent of likely flooding in major storms. The Federal Emergency Management Agency draws up those flood maps for the purposes of determining which properties should be protected with flood insurance—banks are likely to require that coverage when lending to homeowners in designated high-risk zones—and so there is tremendous pressure to not designate properties as at risk, in order to boost home prices and avoid angering both homeowners and local governments. The New York Times has a new interactive map based on a new study by the First Street Foundation that attempts to quantify just how how many more properties face elevated flood risks than FEMA maps suggest. The data is grim: Nearly twice as many properties are at risk of flood damage than are documented in the FEMA maps. It isn't particularly surprising that many of the communities most at risk are in Florida, either. There are numerous reasons why the new maps paint a more dire picture of flood risks in...
    Julia Conley June 25, 2020 2:20AM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. New research released Monday indicated that the nationwide anti-police brutality demonstrations which erupted in the U.S. after the killing of George Floyd have not led to widespread transmission of the coronavirus, as some public experts feared they would. The National Bureau of Economic Research used anonymous cell phone data and local CDC information about Covid-19 infection rates since the protests began in late May, to examine the growth in cases in 315 cities. : "We find no evidence that urban protests reignited COVID-19 case growth during the more than two and a half weeks following protest onset," the report said. Protests are still continuing four weeks after Floyd's killing, as Americans demand justice for Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless other black people who have been killed by police in recent years.   Public health experts have consistently cautioned that protesters should wear protective face masks while at demonstrations and...
    (CNN)New research suggests grocery stores, banks, dentists, universities and big box stores like Walmart should reopen earlier and face fewer restrictions as communities open up after pandemic lockdowns. The study, released on Tuesday, also determined that cafes, gyms, sporting goods stores, bookstores, tobacco and liquor stores should be kept closed until later.The researchers who took part in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-led initiative did a cost benefit analysis of 26 different location types to determine what the tradeoff would be between someone's relative risk of getting infected during a visit and the importance of that establishment in that person's life and to the economy. They also used anonymous geolocation data from 47 million mobile phones to track where people went in the United States during February and March. The biologist whose advice went viral tells us what to do nextHow risky a location could be was based in part on how much social contact someone would have in that location, how many hours they'd spend there, how crowded it would be, how many visits they'd make, and how many unique...
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