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    The largest parts of Minnesota’s $6.8 billion share of the $1.2 trillion federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act are headed to roads, bridges and public transportation. But the biggest slice after that will help address an issue that affects cities and towns throughout Minnesota: clean water. The state expects to get $680 million over the next five years to make infrastructure upgrades that improve wastewater discharge and drinking water. In total, the Environmental Protection Agency will allocate $7.4 billion to states, tribes and U.S. territories for 2022.  State officials and advocates say the money won’t solve longstanding problems with treatment plants and clean water distribution, issues the state has thrown hundreds of millions of dollars at in recent years to help fix. It also won’t accomplish a stated goal of President Joe Biden: remove all lead service lines, which connect water mains to people’s homes. But the cash is still significant, and will help Minnesota make health and safety upgrades like replacing many service lines and cleaning up water contaminated with PFAS, known as “forever chemicals” because they don’t break...
    President Joe Biden's Tuesday speech featured a number of familiar lines on infrastructure that Democrats hope will lobby support for the president's social safety net spending bill and give the party a boost heading into the 2022 midterm elections. Biden traveled to Dakota County Technical College in Rosemont, Minnesota, and his remarks bore several similarities to addresses delivered in Maryland, New Hampshire, and Michigan following the passage of his $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill. BIDEN HAMMERS HOME LOCAL IMPACT OF INFRASTRUCTURE DEAL DURING NEW HAMPSHIRE VISIT The president opened by extending thoughts and prayers to the victims of a school shooting that occurred earlier in the day in Michigan. He then claimed that his dual spending bills would not have been possible without the help of Minnesota's congressional delegation, especially Sen. Amy Klobuchar, whom Biden called "a leader on many issues." "Her colleagues looked at her on everything from lowering the cost of prescription drugs to how to get broadband for the whole country," he continued. "Sen. Klobuchar and I have been friends for a while. She knows how...
              more   RICHMOND, Virginia – Congressmen Abigail Spanberger (D-VA-07) and Donald McEachin (D-VA-04) touted the recently-passed $1.2 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, highlighting funds for Virginia’s infrastructure and the benefits the measure will bring to Virginia workers. “Getting this legislation to President Biden’s desk and signed into law was one of my top priorities this year in Congress, because I know it’s a win for Virginia,” Spanberger said. “With the stroke of a pen we are finally addressing the needs of our roads, our bridges across the Commonwealth, the need for the expansion of broadband connectivity. We’re building out our electric vehicle network and boosting our efforts to build our resiliency against climate change. We’re making smart and long overdue investments in our electrical grid, our water infrastructure, our ports, and our rail systems. These investments will mean faster commute times, lower energy bills, safer drinking water, and faster trips throughout Virginia.” During the press conference, Democrats Spanberger and McEachin stood under a train trestle and were flanked by members of the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA)....
    Chinnapong | iStock Editorial | Getty Images Cryptocurrency investors may face higher taxes as the infrastructure bill cracks down on future IRS reporting, financial experts say. The $1.2 trillion deal calls for mandatory yearly tax reporting from digital currency brokers starting in January 2023 to help pay for President Joe Biden's domestic spending agenda.  The measure may bring in nearly $28 billion over a decade, according to an estimate from the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation. While House lawmakers want to narrow the scope of which "brokers" must follow the rule, experts still expect a costly surprise for crypto investors who haven't been tracking activity. More from Personal Finance:4 year-end moves to slash your cryptocurrency tax billBuild Back Better Act would close tax loophole for crypto investorsWhat first bitcoin futures ETF means for cryptocurrency industry "A lot of these people probably have no idea what's coming," said enrolled agent Adam Markowitz, vice president at Howard L Markowitz PA, CPA in Leesburg, Florida. The IRS requires investors to disclose yearly cryptocurrency activity by checking a box on their tax returns. But many filers don't know which transactions to report. While buying...
    Cal Fire troops battle the Dixie Fire in Plumas County, California, July 2021.Noah Berger/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Zack Bashoor was 19 years old when he joined the US Forest Service in northwestern Montana to fight wildfires. At the time, Bashoor saw firefighting as his career, but after three summers of running chainsaws, digging trenches around blazes and covering structures in protective wrap, he left to become a resource forester at a lumber mill. Many of his peers left firefighting, too, citing the industry’s toxic workforce culture and low compensation for a physically demanding job with a risk of injury or occasionally, death. “There’s this conundrum where a lot of brilliant young people come in and they eventually end up leaving,” Bashoor said. “They find something better to do that isn’t as dangerous and pays a little more money. There were very limited paths to permanent employment.”  But that...
    Former 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton suggested Tuesday night that Americans don't quite grasp the 'extraordinary accomplishments' of President Joe Biden. Clinton pointed out that Biden was able to get both the COVID relief bill and the bipartisan infrastructure deal to his desk, with the Build Back Better bill already passed thorugh the House.  'You know, democracy is messy. You know, a lot of people got, oh I think, kind of frustrated looking at the messy process of legislation,' Clinton told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow. 'And they didn't really appreciate that, within a year, the Biden administration has passed two major pieces of legislation through the House and the Senate.'    Former 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton suggested Tuesday night that Americans don't quite grasp the 'extraordinary accomplishments' of President Joe Biden during an interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow  Hillary Clinton pointed out how President Joe Biden, seen speaking in Washington Tuesday before leaving for Thanksgiving break, got two large pieces of legislation across his desk, with a probable third on the way  'By any measure those are extraordinary accomplishments and they...
    MARTINEZ (KPIX) — Signature-gathering has begun to place an initiative on the 2022 ballot that would force the legislature to fund more water storage in California. But even supporters admit, the success of the measure may depend on the weather. With many reservoirs in the state drying up and no guarantee of a wet winter, some Central Valley farmers and Southern California water districts are pushing an initiative called the ‘Water Infrastructure Funding Act of 2022.’ If passed by the voters, it would require the state to spend two percent of the general fund on projects that would expand water supplies. READ MORE: Kelp Forest Loss An Ecological Disaster Requiring Creative Solutions In Age of Climate Change“That would be $3-to $4 billion per year to fund water supply projects. And we don’t choose specific projects, but we define categories that are eligible for funding,” said Edward Ring, a co-organizer and spokesperson for the campaign known as More Water Now. The effort to qualify the state-wide measure has just begun and many Bay Area water agencies aren’t even aware of it...
    Biden with the New Hampshire Democrats who helped pass the infrastructure bill. President Joe Biden is not, as of yet, calling out the Republicans who are taking credit for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) a large majority of them voted against. Not yet, but he’s making it very clear in his road trip to celebrate the bill who got the job done. He signed the bill on Monday, and then hit the road, starting in New Hampshire. At his event there, Biden made a point of repeatedly and at length thanking the all-Democratic congressional delegation: Sens. Maggie Hassan and Jeanne Shaheen and Reps. Annie Kuster and Chris Pappas. “Folks, it’s not hyperbole to say that your delegation is laser-focused on your needs—the people of New Hampshire—the concerns that are discussed around our kitchen tables. This isn’t esoteric,” Biden said. “This isn’t some gigantic bill—it is. But it’s about what happens to ordinary people.” “My message to the people of New Hampshire is simple,” the president said. “It’s this: Because of this delegation, New Hampshire and America are moving again.” The size of...
    MSNBC anchor Chuck Todd said Tuesday on his show “MTP Daily” that President Joe Biden’s signing of the bipartisan infrastructure bill felt like “an epilogue to the ending” of Democrats’ majorities in Congress. Todd said, “Yesterday that event, I’ll be honest it just felt like an event out of time. That event might have been impactful in August or September or October. It feels more like an epilogue to the ending of what’s going to — might not be a good story for Democrats in 2022.” Political reporter Kelly O’Donnell said, “Well, certainly the White House is trying to capture whatever it can by saying this signing ceremony is a way that Democrats and Republicans came together for a bit of the pomp and ceremony on the south lawn, so they’re going to true to use it. Certainly they have heard the criticism. It has been plenty loud that it could have moved more swiftly and they could have had more political benefit if they had action earlier. Will they take those lessons into the negotiations happening on Capitol Hill this weekend into...
    The Texas Republicans wants to repeal a key funding mechanism for the new infrastructure law — with no offset. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz (R), a vocal opponent of any legislation that increases the national debt, filed a bill on Monday that would effectively add billions to the deficit by repealing part of President Joe Biden's newly signed infrastructure package. The bill would specifically roll back one of the funding mechanisms that pays for the new law's $550 billion investment in roads, bridges, water systems, broadband, electrical vehicles, and clean energy infrastructure. The section Cruz is seeking to eliminate would increase reporting requirements for cryptocurrency — alternative money systems like Bitcoin — to make sure that profits from those investments can be taxed the same as others. Cruz, who unsuccessfully tried to get that provision removed before the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act became law, decried it in a Tuesday press release as a "devastating attack" on an "emerging" industry. According to the nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation, the cryptocurrency rules...
    President Joe Biden touted his infrastructure bill as a victory for 'ordinary people' on Tuesday and insisted the next item on his agenda - his $1.85 trillion budget of social programs - would be fully paid for even though the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office says it won't be.  'Everything in this bill matters to individual lives of real people. This is not something abstract,' Biden said of the $1 trillion bipartisan bill he signed into law on Monday. It focuses on traditional infrastructure projects. Speaking on a cold New Hampshire day as flurries of snow rained down, Biden said: 'This isn't some gigantic bill. It is but it's about what happens to ordinary people, conversations around those kitchen tables that are both profound as they are ordinary. How do I cross a bridge in a snowstorm?' He called the legislation a prime example of how Democrats and Republicansw, when 'we can work together we can deliver real results.' Biden spoke on the NH 175 Bridge in Woodstock, New Hampshire, a large American flag hanging behind him and snow flakes falling around...
    President Biden at the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act signing ceremony. As of this year, there were more than 220,000 bridges needing repair in the U.S. according to the American Road and Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) using the U.S. Department of Transportation’s bridge inventory database, and 45,000 of them are classified as “structurally deficient.” ARTBA determined that 40% of bridges needed to be replaced entirely or repaired, including a third of all the bridges on interstate highways. That’s a lot of work, and a lot of money—an estimated $41.8 billion. At the current rate of construction, it would take 40 years to fix them all, ARTBA estimated. The American Society of Civil Engineers is even more pessimistic on the state of our infrastructure, estimating it would take 50 years to fix them all and $125 billion to fix. The good news as of this week is that it’s not going to take 40 or 50 years to fix them all, because the current rate of funding and construction is going to get a big boost, and  President Joe Biden gets to deliver those good tidings because...
    PRESIDENT Joe Biden has signed a $1.2trillion infrastructure bill into law - and it touches upon everything from bridges to broadband and roads to railways. It also includes a cryptocurrency tax reporting requirement, which is creating controversy and raising questions that the language is too broad. 1President Biden signed the $1trillion infrastructure bill which contains a provision affecting cryptocurrency The bill is dubbed a rare bipartisan win in Washington after President Biden looked for support across the aisle. Talks collapsed over the summer, but a bipartisan group of senators pushed for framework which led to the breakthrough deal. The bill passed the House on a 228-206 vote, with 13 Republicans voting for the bill and six Democrats opposing it. The bill passed the Senate with 19 Republicans supporting it. To promote the infrastructure package, the president will be visiting several places in the US, including North Woodstock, New Hampshire where a bridge over the Pemigewasset River has been on the state’s “red list” for its poor condition. He'll also visit a General Motors plant in Detroit where they make electric...
                                   Presented by ExxonMobil     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Tuesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths each morning this week: Monday, 763,092; Tuesday, 764,365. President BidenJoe BidenBiden restates commitment to 'one China' policy on Taiwan in call with Xi Biden raises human rights with China's Xi during four hour meeting Biden, Xi hold 'candid' discussion amid high tensions MORE and Democrats are attempting to execute something that has eluded them for months: a drama-free week.   Part one of that mission was completed Monday as Biden, surrounded by Democratic lawmakers (and some Republicans), signed the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package into law. His signature put a bow...
    Despite its moniker as a “bipartisan infrastructure bill,” the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act contains no conservative victories but has many leftist carveouts. President Joe Biden signed the $1.2 trillion Bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act into law, marking Biden’s most significant legislative victory since Congress passed his coronavirus rescue plan in March, the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan. This infrastructure bill serves as one part of Biden’s infrastructure agenda. The other bill, the $1.75 trillion reconciliation Build Back Better Act, would fund “human infrastructure,” expanding American welfare programs and climate change policies. Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and other Democrats have compared his Build Back Better legislative agenda to the New Deal and the Great Society programs even though Democrats have scaled down the Build Back Better Act from $3.5 to $1.75 trillion. President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi leave a meeting with House Democrats at the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill on October 28, 2021, in Washington, DC. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images) The passage of the so-called bipartisan infrastructure bill would not have been...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- "The Countdown" is here to get you caught up with all of the day's political news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Today's political headlines:Pres. Biden signs infrastructure bill into lawPresident Joe Biden signed the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package into law Monday afternoon, seeking a jolt of momentum for his presidency as he commemorates a major legislative victory with pomp and circumstance on the White House South Lawn.What President Biden's infrastructure plan means for NY, NJ, CTThe bill will provide an influx of money to the Tri-State area, with New York set to receive $170 billion. More than $10 billion will go to the MTA for expansion and upgrades, while roads, bridges and electric-vehicle charging infrastructure has been allocated nearly $13 billion.Steve Bannon surrenders to face contempt chargesLongtime Trump ally Steve Bannon appeared before a judge on Monday to face criminal contempt charges for defying a subpoena from Congress' Jan. 6 committee, then declared combatively...
    If it wasn’t clear by the setup—fifty state flags on the White House’s South Lawn, an 800-person cheering section, the dais loaded with senior congressional leadership, Republican allies, labor bosses, and his own vice president—President Joe Biden had a straightforward message at the signing ceremony for his $1 trillion infrastructure bill: It’s a big fucking deal. “My message to the American people is this: America’s moving again! And your life is going to change for the better!” an animated Biden told a crowd of nearly a thousand people gathered in the crisp autumn sun, some of whom chanting “JOE! JOE! JOE!”, moments before signing the legislation into law on Monday afternoon. “This law is a blue-collar blueprint to rebuild America—it leaves nobody behind.” “Things are gonna turn around in a big way!” Biden said. His remarks advocated not only for the revitalization of America’s roadways and railways, but of its bipartisan spirit—which, given the makeup of Congress, may be an even taller order than the biggest infrastructure package in half a century. “Let’s remember this day—let’s remember we can come...
    Adam Schultz/Zuma Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.President Joe Biden secured his first major legislative achievement when he signed a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill into law on Monday. The package, resulting from months of congressional debate, includes billions of dollars of investments in the nation’s bridges, roads, airports, transit systems, and power grid. After the Senate passed the bill with bipartisan support in August, the fate of the legislation hung in the balance for months as Democrats struggled to reach a deal on a complementary spending bill. That bill, the Build Back Better Act, holds the rest of Biden’s ambitious domestic agenda, including massive investments in climate-stabilizing policies and the social safety net. When the infrastructure bill passed in the House earlier this month, six progressives voted against it, arguing that they would lose their leverage by moving forward on one bill without the other. The infrastructure bill itself will funnel billions of dollars into electric vehicle charging stations and climate resilience efforts like coastal restoration,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Biden signs $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, tells Americans ”your life is going to change for the better.’ Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    We're halfway to Building Back Better. President Joe Biden will officially ring in infrastructure week, for real, when he signs the infrastructure bill Monday afternoon. The $1.2 trillion package contains $550 billion in new spending on road, bridges, ports, rail, and water systems. The new law is officially titled the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. (Or IIJA, which is much better than its former acronym, “BIF.”) If you are so inclined, you can read the whole thing—all 2,740 pages (but with huge margins and spacing). It is heavy on current fossil fuel-dependent infrastructure, with $110 billion for roads and bridges. In addition to broadband, it includes $55 billion for water; $7.5 billion for electric vehicle charging stations; $39 billion for transit; $1 billion for Biden’s original $20 billion plan to “reconnect” communities of color; $66 billion for freight and passenger rail; $25 billion for airports; $73 billion to modernize the energy grid; and $21 billion toward environmental remediation. In addition, it includes $65 billion for broadband infrastructure, which has the potential to be a “game changer” with the $2 billion for rural communities split equally between...
    WASHINGTON -- The $1 trillion infrastructure plan that President Joe Biden plans to sign into law has money for roads, bridges, ports, rail transit, safe water, the power grid, broadband internet and more.The plan promises to reach almost every corner of the country. It's a historic investment that the president has compared to the building of the transcontinental railroad and Interstate Highway System. The White House is projecting that the investments will add, on average, about 2 million jobs per year over the coming decade.The bill cleared the House on a 228-206 vote Nov. 5, ending weeks of intraparty negotiations in which liberal Democrats insisted the legislation be tied to a larger social spending bill - an effort to press more moderate Democrats to support both.The Senate passed the legislation on a 69-30 vote in August after rare bipartisan negotiations, and the House kept that compromise intact. Thirteen House Republicans voted for the bill, giving Democrats more than enough votes to overcome a handful of defections from progressives.A breakdown of the bill expected to become law Monday:ROADS AND BRIDGESThe bill...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The $1 trillion infrastructure plan that President Joe Biden plans to sign into law has money for roads, bridges, ports, rail transit, safe water, the power grid, broadband internet and more. The plan promises to reach almost every corner of the country. It’s a historic investment that the president has compared to the building of the transcontinental railroad and Interstate Highway System. The White House is projecting that the investments will add, on average, about 2 million jobs per year over the coming decade. The bill cleared the House on a 228-206 vote Nov. 5, ending weeks of intraparty negotiations in which liberal Democrats insisted the legislation be tied to a larger social spending bill — an effort to press more moderate Democrats to support both. The Senate passed the legislation on a 69-30 vote in August after rare bipartisan negotiations, and the House kept that compromise intact. Thirteen House Republicans voted for the bill, giving Democrats more than enough votes to overcome a handful of defections from progressives. A breakdown of the bill expected...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Chinatown leaders are hoping this image of the Vine Street Expressway will soon be a thing of the past. Chinatown was separated decades ago by the construction of that highway. Now, money in the new infrastructure package could help reconnect the neighborhood. READ MORE: Hatboro Police Officer Ryan Allen's 'Come A Long Way' After Near-Fatal Bee Sting Put Him In Coma For MonthThe infrastructure plan sets aside $1 billion for a proposal to reconnect urban neighborhoods. Chinatown leaders spoke Friday at Crane Community Center, which overlooks the Vine Street Expressway. READ MORE: Shortage Of Staff Forces Truman High School In Levittown To Cancel Classes On Friday“We now have a path forward to correct the highways which were forced upon communities of color and immigrant communities,” John Chin, executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation, said. Congressman Brendan Boyle of Philadelphia said he has spoken to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg about potentially building a cap over the Vine Street Expressway. MORE NEWS: Fire In Colwyn, Delaware County Displaces 17 PeoplePresident Joe Biden plans to sign the infrastructure...
    In Washington, D.C., passing a $1.2 trillion infrastructure package was a highly partisan event. But spending Minnesota’s share of that money on roads, bridges, broadband and other physical improvements across the state likely won’t be. It seems there’s something about having $6-7 billion to spend that brings people together. State Sen. Scott Newman“Absolutely it’s good news for the state,” said Senate Transportation Committee Chair Scott Newman, R-Hutchinson. “It’s literally, in my estimation, a once in a lifetime opportunity to address some of the aging infrastructure in the state of Minnesota.” “I am overjoyed,” said Sen. Scott Dibble, the Minneapolis DFLer who is his caucus’ ranking member on the Transportation Committee.  As with other recent large federal spending bills, the state has some idea what amounts will flow from the various categories but will have to wait weeks, perhaps months, for specific guidance on how it can be spent. The state usually spends about $2 billion a year on road and bridge work from fuel taxes and bonding and will likely receive an additional $4.8 billion over five years for that...
    The D.C. Memo is a weekly recap of Washington political news, journalism, and opinion, delivered with an eye toward what matters for Minnesota. Sign up to get it in your inbox every Thursday. Minnesota Department of TransportationThe House finally passed its long-awaited infrastructure bill Friday night.Hello and welcome back to the D.C. Memo. This week you can find me continually laughing about the strange experience of living in the D.C. area: I was at a birthday event at a downtown bar late Friday night when a cheer rang out…not to raise a drink for the birthday girl, but to celebrate the infrastructure bill passing the House. Can’t make this stuff up. Aside from passing that major bill, here’s what else has been going on in the District this week: explaining the origin of “Let’s go Brandon,” Republicans on inflation and Minnesota Reps. introduce Veterans Day legislation. We can finally stop talking about Infrastructure Week Or is this really just the start of Infrastructure Week? I for one am relieved that the House finally passed its long-awaited infrastructure bill Friday...
    Liz Cheney tore into Kevin McCarthy for not speaking out about Rep. Paul Gosar's video threatening Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, saying the House GOP leader is showing a 'lack of strength.' McCarthy has kept silent about an anime video Gosar tweeted, which shows a character with his face killing Ocasio-Cortez.  The GOP leader also said nothing about the threats made to the 13 Republican lawmakers who voted for Joe Biden's infrastructure bill. One of them, Rep. Fred Upton, said he he has received death threats.  Cheney, who has become a vocal critic of former President Donald Trump and his influence on the party, said Gosar should be censured 'for his continued indefensible activities.'  And she blasted McCarthy during an interview with the Associated Press.  'It's a real symbol of his lack of strength, the lack of leadership in our conference right now, and the extent to which he and other leaders seem to have lost their moral compass,' Cheney said. 'In a moment where you've got an avowed white nationalist in Rep. Gosar who has posted a video advocating the killing of...
    The White House announced Thursday that President Joe Biden would travel to New Hampshire on Tuesday and Detroit, Michigan on Wednesday with the aim of selling the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure law to Americans. Biden will sign the package at the White House on Monday and then head to Woodstock, New Hampshire, the next day - where he'll deliver remarks at the site of a bridge, as the bill funds hard infrastructure projects like bridges, roadways and the expansion of broadband internet.  New Hampshire - the site of the nation's first presidential primary - could also be a trouble spot for Democrats next year, with Sen. Maggie Hassan facing re-election, and Republicans targeting both Democratic House members, Reps. Annie Kuster and Chris Pappas.  The White House announced Thursday that President Joe Biden would travel to New Hampshire on Tuesday and Detroit, Michigan on Wednesday with the aim of selling the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure law to Americans Last week's election results - which will put Republican and political newbie Glenn Youngkin in the Virginia governor's mansion over the commonwealth's former Democratic...
                        Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed The Tennessee Star’s National Political Editor Neil McCabe to the newsmaker line to discuss House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s compliance with the passing of a pork loaded infrastructure bill and the second one on the horizon. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line by the national political editor for The Tennessee Star and The Star News Network, my good friend Neil McCabe. Good morning, Neil. McCabe: Morning, Michael. Leahy: I understand that there’s been a report of a crime in Washington, D.C. Someone apparently stole ranking Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s backbone. McCabe: (Laughs) Yeah, he had a bit of a spine deficit. It’s really amazing what McCarthy did, because this is a guy who has all the leverage in the world. Everyone and his brother knows that this guy is lined up to be the next Speaker of...
    While a few Republican lawmakers expressed open frustration online against their 13 colleagues who voted to pass President Joe Biden’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill late last week, the anger within the party is far more widespread, multiple lawmakers told the Daily Caller. Members, fueled by a feeling of betrayal after Republican votes gave Biden a win, are also angered at the level of leadership coming from House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. “There’s a significant amount of frustration and some degree of anger,” one Republican congressman told the Caller. “There’s a feeling of betrayal from the party … The blame is to be shared with McCarthy and leadership.” Another Republican congressman, who described McCarthy’s leadership as “weak,” said his explanation for the 13 defectors was that some of these members are retiring and therefore can’t be controlled. This congressman pointed out that the 13 Republican votes ended up being “the difference in Joe Biden winning or losing.” A GOP aide offered a counter-perspective to the mounting frustration within the party, arguing that the threshold for the vote was much smaller and...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw  To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN   --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.    HAPPENING NOW Kyle Rittenhouse broke down during his trial:    “Kyle Rittenhouse broke down on Wednesday as he described getting cornered by the first person he killed during protests in Kenosha, Wis., last August.” https://bit.ly/3CfFz8B Back story: “Rittenhouse is currently on trial for multiple felonies for killing two people and wounding another during protests that erupted following the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man.”  Watch the trial live: Here’s the livestream: https://bit.ly/2Yys3yS  Live updates from the trial, via CNN: https://cnn.it/3n1PQ3y TRIAL SIGHTS AND SOUNDS: The judge gave Rittenhouse a break to collect himself: “The judge calls for a 10-minute break after Kyle Rittenhouse breaks down and begins to hyperventilate on the stand while describing the events leading up to the fatal August 2020 shooting.”(Via Mediaite)  Video: https://bit.ly/3n2GZPl It’s Wednesday....
    President Joe Biden worked the phones with CEOs from retail and shipping giants and promised Americans a “much different Christmas this year” in a new White House video designed to quell supply chain concerns — and sell the president’s newly-passed infrastructure bill. On Tuesday, the White House released a short video entitled “President Biden on Supply Chains and the Holidays” that featured the president speaking directly to camera about the holiday season, subtly reminding people that his administration inherited supply chain problems, and extolling the infrastructure bill that passed in Congress last week. “I know a lot of Americans are worried we’re not going to be enough stock on the shelves for Thanksgiving and for Christmas, or they can be able to get what you need because there’s was a short supply last year because of COVID and a range of other things,” Biden said in the video’s opening, boldly and openly naming “Christmas.” Biden said “I just got off the phone with the largest retailers in America” over shots of him working the phones, speaking with the likes of...
    The White House is looking to refine its sales pitch for the newly passed infrastructure bill in a bid to boost the administration's standing with voters after a difficult election for Democrats and as President BidenJoe BidenNicaragua's Ortega set to win election amid international criticism Rep. Gosar posts anime video showing him striking Biden, Ocasio-Cortez Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Activists cry foul over COP26 draft MORE has seen his approval ratings sink. Officials have argued for months about the need for infrastructure investments to maintain the nation's economic competitiveness. Now, with one bill passed and another spending package working its way through Congress, Biden and his top aides are seeking to convince the public that the White House agenda is tangibly benefitting voters. The president will head to Baltimore on Wednesday to tout new investments in ports that will alleviate supply chain issues. The White House has also assigned a handful of Cabinet secretaries with messaging the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill to the public. Ensuring the public is aware of how the bill is benefitting...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden on Tuesday called on Republicans to stop pursuing retaliation against 13 members of their party who voted to pass the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill in the House last week, saying he's never seen things this way in Congress. Some conservative House Republicans have discussed booting those GOP colleagues from committee spots, even though the effort faces little chance of succeeding. And former President Donald Trump has been privately criticizing the 13 Republicans who voted to pass the bill, questioning why they would give Biden a win when he's struggling in the polls, according to a GOP source."Well, I'm hoping, Jaime, that we can get back to a place where there's more civility in politics," Biden said in conversation with Democratic National Committee Chair Jaime Harrison during a grassroots town hall. "I really mean it. And I've never seen it this way." He continued, "If they're a chairman of a committee, they're trying to strip them of that chairmanship. I've never seen it like this before. It's gotta stop for the sake of America. I know I get...
    During a Tuesday interview on Fox News Channel’s “America’s Newsroom,” Rep. Nicole Malliotakis (R-NY) sounded off on her vote to pass the Democrats’ $1.2 trillion infrastructure package. Malliotakis, one of only 13 House Republicans to vote in favor of the bill, emphasized the importance of the traditional infrastructure items included in the legislation for her New York City district. She also said her vote “significantly” took away the “leverage” from the members of the so-called Squad who voted against the bill. “I read this bill. It is cover to cover infrastructure — $350 billion is going to roads, highways and bridges, which you would consider traditional infrastructure,” Malliotakis outlined. “And the other $550 billion is for, you know, ports, airports, seaports, ferry systems, coastal resiliency projects like the East Shore Sea Wall that’s so important to my district, sewer systems which is so incredibly important following Ida, the damage that took place in New York City, upgrading our subway signals to a communication-based train control. We’re still relying on pre-World War II equipment in some subways. So, for an aging...
    House Republicans have no problem with one of their members posting a tweet depicting him murdering Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez but they are outraged at 13 members of their caucus who voted to pass President Joe Biden's infrastructure bill. According to Jake Sherman's Punchbowl News, rank and file GOP members of Congress are trying to force Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to strip the 13 of their committee assignments, noting that "GOP leadership is bracing" for the attempt. McCarthy was opposed to the bill, which will vastly improve basic necessities like roads, bridges, rail, and the nation's ports, expand broadband access, and help localities protect against climate change. Not only are GOP members of Congress angry the 13 voted for the legislation, they are angry they voted "early," rather than forcing Democrats to cross the majority threshold of votes to pass the bill without Republicans. "Much of the anger is directed at Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.), who voted early for the legislation. Katko is the ranking member on the Homeland Security Committee. Katko told multiple lawmakers on the House floor...
    In this article PAVEVIDEO3:3503:35Trading Nation: Stock winners of the infrastructure package, according to tradersTrading NationA long-awaited infrastructure bill passed the House over the weekend and is now headed to President Joe Biden for his signature. That package, with more than a $1 trillion price tag, includes new funding for projects from bridges and roads to broadband and utilities. The PAVE infrastructure ETF fell back Tuesday, easing after rallying on Monday. It has also outperformed the S&P 500 this year, climbing more than 35%. Ari Wald, head of technical analysis at Oppenheimer, says it has more room to run. "I think that the infrastructure ETF is a great way to gain exposure," Wald told CNBC's "Trading Nation" on Monday. "We're bullish on that industry because it is indeed reclaiming its leadership. You can see that in the relative ratio of the PAVE ETF versus the S&P 500. Rising line indicates it's outperforming versus its benchmark."Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwardsWald highlights diversified motion and control parts manufacturer Parker-Hannifin as one stock at the top of his watch list. "Parker-Hannifin ... jumped last...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) — While individual projects were not announced, the White House fact sheet said Florida is in line for: — $13.1 billion for highway programs and $245 million for bridge replacements and repairs. READ MORE: Florida COVID-19 Hospitalizations Up Slightly— $2.6 billion to improve public transportation across the state. — $1.6 billion for water improvements. — $1.2 billion for airport development. — $198 million to expand an electric-vehicle charging network. — A minimum of $100 million to expand broadband coverage, with a projection that it will provide access to at least 707,000 Floridians. — $29 million for cybersecurity. — $26 million to protect against wildfires. Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried on Tuesday touted as “a big deal” billions of dollars headed to Florida for roads, bridges, airports and expanding broadband service in rural areas as part of a $1 trillion infrastructure bill on President Joe Biden’s desk. Meanwhile, Gov. Ron DeSantis, who Fried hopes to unseat next year, has questioned “pork-barrel” spending in the bill while also arguing Florida might not get its fair share. “It seems like there’s a...
    After a long battle of wills between moderates and progressives in Congress, one of Democrats’ priority bills passed the House late Friday night, paving the way  for the president to sign the roughly $1 trillion infrastructure bill into law. House lawmakers passed the bill, formally titled the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, around 11:30 p.m. on Friday in a vote of 226 to 208. This approval in the House came nearly two months after the Senate first approved the bill, and that Senate vote happened after nearly five months of back-and-forth between President Biden and Senate Republicans. The 2,702-page bill allocates funds to key areas like repairing roads and bridges and investments in public transit, Amtrak, broadband internet, the electric grid, electric vehicles, clean drinking water, Great Lakes restoration, airports and transportation safety programs. Now that the bill has passed in its final form, here’s what Minnesota stands to get from the new federal infrastructure funding. Article continues after advertisement Roads, buses and pipes Of the roughly $1 trillion in the infrastructure bill, Minnesota is set to receive an...
    During a Monday appearance on Fox News Channel’s “America Reports,” Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL) blasted his GOP congressional colleagues for voting in favor of the Democrats’ $1.2 trillion infrastructure package. Donalds said the 13 Republicans who voted to pass the legislation “did the absolute wrong thing.” He argued the vote helped “tee up” the larger reconciliation bill Democrats have tied to the infrastructure bill. “First of all, I’m highly disappointed with the vote that happened. There is no reason that any colleague on the Republican side of the aisle should’ve helped Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi pass this infrastructure bill,” Donalds outlined. “First of all, it’s a bad bill. That’s number one. It does spend some money in key areas and key corridors in the United States, but it taxes across the country; it begins to drop that climate change nonsense in the Department of Transportation already more than it already is.” “Now, to the members of my caucus that voted for this, you did the absolute wrong thing. You never should have voted for this,” he added. “If you...
    Missing and Black: Families of Arianna Fitts and Daniel Robinson keep searching SpaceX returns 4 astronauts back to Earth, ending nearly 200-day flight © Getty Images MARKET EXTRA Load Error The bipartisan infrastructure bill passed late Friday by the House of Representatives promises hundreds of billions for a once-in-a-generation rebuild of America’s aging and neglected built environment. But for the municipalities that stand to benefit from the funds, and the bond market where such projects are normally financed, it may not move the needle much, public-finance experts say. President Joe Biden is likely to sign into law this week the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, including $550 billion in new federal investment in the kinds of projects cities, counties and states fund and manage. The biggest boost will go to spending on roads and bridges, power systems, rail, broadband, water systems and public transit, according to an analysis from Moody’s Analytics. An overview of some specific initiatives, from the National League of Cities, is here. Following the $260 billion American Rescue Plan by about six months,...
                                      Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Tuesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths each day this week: Monday, 754,431; Tuesday, 755,643.  President BidenJoe BidenNicaragua's Ortega set to win election amid international criticism Rep. Gosar posts anime video showing him striking Biden, Ocasio-Cortez Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Activists cry foul over COP26 draft MORE needs no lessons in pitching voters on the importance of American ports, highways, bridges and rail. He’s been doing it for months. He did it as vice president during visits to Granite City, Ill.; Cleveland, Ohio; and Norfolk, Va. He gave an interview about...
                      by Ned Ryun  Having been in the D.C. area for over 20 years now, I’ve come to live by the maxim, “Always bank on the GOP snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.” I was proved right again this last week when 13 Republicans in the House helped pass the $1.2 trillion “Gateway to the Green New Deal” otherwise masquerading as an infrastructure bill. As I wrote back in August, only 23 percent of this bill is really for infrastructure. The other 77 percent is for things like the $213 billion “allocated for retrofitting two million homes and buildings to make them more “sustainable,” whatever that means. Or the $20 billion for racial equity and environmental justice. Or the mileage tax, as in yes, they want to explore taxing you for every mile you drive in your car. In the wake of an absolutely stunning clean sweep for Republicans in Virginia from governor to House of Delegates—in a state Republicans hadn’t won statewide in a dozen years and where they’ve lost...
                        Live from Music Row Monday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed Congressman Tim Burchett (R-TN-02) to the newsmaker line to discuss the passing of the trillion-dollar infrastructure bill, how it will affect Americans and the Republican turncoats. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line now by our very good friend, Congressman Tim Burchett from Knox County, the East’s Second District of Tennessee. Good morning, Congressman Burchett. Burchett: Hey, brother. Thank you so much for having me on. Leahy: Well, I always enjoy having you on, Tim, because you’re a fun guy and you got a great sense of humor. Help me out here. I need some help, brother. Burchett: I’m sorry that the people on radio can’t also see how good-looking I am. Leahy: (Laughs) Well, we will vouch for that. This $1.2 trillion quote infrastructure bill passed. And then 13 Republican turncoats’ voted for to...
                        Live from Music Row Monday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio for another edition of Crom’s Commentary. Leahy: At this time it’s time today for a Crommentary. What is today’s Crommentary? Carmichael: Michael, this infrastructure bill, which has a bunch of garbage. It has a few good things in it, but it also has a bunch of garbage in it. And the bad things will come out here soon. You were talking with a Congressman Burchett and as he said, nobody knows exactly what’s in it now that bill apparently has been sitting around a long time because they ended up having to pass exactly the bill that was in the Senate, but nobody expected that to actually happen. So what Pelosi has done is she has taken what she can get for now. I don’t know if you...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – House Democratic leaders say they want to pass the president’s nearly $2 trillion social spending bill as early as next week. In the meantime, the president is expected to sign the infrastructure bill soon. Here’s some of what’s in it for Florida according to the White House website: $13.1 billion dollars for highways At least $245 million for bridge replacement and repairs $2.6 billion over five years to improve public transportation options $198 million dollars for expansion of electric vehicle charging stations A minimum of $100 million to help provide broadband coverage $1.2 billion for airports over five years Click here for more.
    Ana Maria Dimand, Boise State University The U.S. Congress passed an infrastructure bill that funds more than a trillion dollars in nationwide federal spending on Nov. 5, 2021. The bill puts about US$240 billion toward building or rebuilding roads, bridges, public transit, airports and railways. More than $150 billion is slated for projects that address climate change, like building electric vehicle charging stations, upgrading energy grids and production to work better with renewables, and making public transit more environmentally sustainable. There's funding for cybersecurity, clean water and waste treatment systems, broadband internet connections and more. The bill is the largest investment in the nation's infrastructure in decades. So how does the government go about spending all that money? Officials are required to follow certain procedures, regulations and guidelines for advertising and gathering bids, reviewing them and then hiring contractors to do the work. This process is called “public procurement." What's interesting to me and my colleagues who study public procurement policy is how this massive influx of spending can be used as an innovative policy tool to further...